Advertisements


Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource: philippinetimes philippinetimesJun 14th, 2018

Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Japan to extend loan to help Malaysia’s debt problem

TOKYO --- The leaders of Malaysia and Japan have agreed that Japan will issue yen-denominated bonds of up to 200 billion yen ($1.8 billion) to help the Southeast Asian country battle its fiscal deficit. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told a news conference Tuesday that Japan also will provide loans to help Malaysia in areas such as education, transportation and people exchanges. Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, who returned to leadership this year, has long advocated learning from Japan's postwar economic growth. Earlier Tuesday, Emperor Akihito presented Mahathir with one of Japan's highest awards for his international and cultural achievement. /ee...Keep on reading: Japan to extend loan to help Malaysia’s debt problem.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 6th, 2018

Colombia park fights animal trafficking with education

    BOGOTA, Colombia --- On the outskirts of Colombia's capital red macaws share a nature reserve with ocelots and black-headed parrots. A white-crested harpy eagle whistles at schoolchildren who walk on a well-preserved trail.   The animals come from different regions of this ecologically diverse South American country. But most of them share one thing in common: They were rescued from animal traffickers.   As leaders in the fight against wildlife trafficking gather in London this week at the Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference, conservationists around the world are working to provide shelters to the thousands of animals that have been rescued fro...Keep on reading: Colombia park fights animal trafficking with education.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018

Learning to change the world

While attending a recent three week-long educational leadership seminar workshop at one of the most prestigious universities in the world, I was struck by the sign that states, “Learn to Change the World.” This message hangs brightly in front of the Gutman Library of the Graduate School of Education of Harvard University, and this is the theme that resonated during my stay in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As I looked at that sign every day, I knew that through learning, I would be able to change the world despite an environment that is characterized as volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. While at Harvard, I was mentored by some of the world’s best, and was also able to learn with some of the brightest educational leaders in Asia. This was part of my fellowship with the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia (UBCHEA). The post Learning to change the world appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

ASEAN insight: A glimpse in the eyes of a youth leader

ASEAN insight: A glimpse in the eyes of a youth leader Vox Bikol Sat, 12/09/2017 - 01:35 PILI, Camarines Sur, Dec.06 (PIA) ---  “It’s unbelievable! The experience seemed so surreal but I was there, flesh and body, and have represented the Philippines as one of the delegates to the #NOWASEAN 2017Conference, promoting among others, the significant role of the youth in understanding climate change and disaster resilience in ASEAN countries.” Emman Cleodoro, Coordinator of El Verde Youth for Climate Action and  Environment, Disaster Management and Emergency Response Office (EDMERO) Environmental Advocacy Officer  of the Provincial government of Camarines Sur was the lone representative of the country and was among the youth leaders from different countries chosen to participate in the conference in commemoration of the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of ASEAN and the Philippines’ National Day for Youth in Climate Action  held at Sofitel Philippine Plaza, Manila last November 23 to 26. “It’s an honor and a privilege to be the representative of the Philippines in the ASEAN conference in Manila. This conference taught me a lot of things, most especially what can the youth do to create a significant impact on the country’s campaign on climate change and disaster risk reduction management. This experience is something that I will treasure for the rest of my life,” Cleodoro humbly stated. At the prime of his youth at 27, Emman as he is fondly called by friends and colleagues had been advocating a cleaner and greener environment for the past 5 years under the helm of EDMERO. He owed his achievements to his mentors and points to EDMERO Chief Lucena “Che” Bermeo and the dynamic and young Camarines Sur Governor Migz Villafuerte as the source of his fervor to passionately pursue his environmental advocacy and share it with the young crowd. One of the highlights of the conference, Emman narrated was the adoption of the Southeast Asian Youth in Climate Action and Disaster Resilience Network (SAYCAN) Framework Agreement. The agreement binds the youth in a commitment to advocate youth empowerment on climate action and disaster resilience by promoting education and capacity building, engaging champions and strengthening partnership with other environmental stakeholders through online and on-ground strategies. ““The NowASEAN Conference is an initiative of the Filipino youth-led climate action undertaking dubbed as #NowPH or Not on our Watch Philippines. One of their outputs is the adoption of the SAYCAN Framework agreement.  It played a significant role in gathering signatures for the adoption of the Paris agreement held in France in 2015,” Emman elaborated. SAYCAN hopes to bring young people towards a common understanding of the ill effects of climate change and what the community can do to alleviate the impact of any catastrophe in their areas.  To do this, education and capacity building, including engaging environmental champions and stakeholders is a must. It is also important to build partnership, establish and strengthen them by the use of various strategies, both online and on-ground thereby engaging more and more stakeholders to take part in the fight to win back greener days and a safer environment for the next generation. “In the years that I have served as Environmental Advocacy Officer, I have seen the prowess and competence of the youth to promote a climate and disaster-resilient way of life and pursue sustainable development.  Meeting other ASEAN youth leaders coming from our neighboring ASEAN countries, only proves that we are all attuned towards this one vision of creating a haven of environment loving people who is as concerned as I am in ensuring that our children’s children will still have a place which they can call “home” in the upcoming years.”  (LSMacatangay, PIAV/Camarines Sur)  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  voxbikolRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

City wants word out on anti-discrimination law

TO promote a culture of respect, the Cebu City Government urged all barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan officials, and leaders of urban poor and homeowners’ associations to take part in the barangay-based education drive for City Ordinance 2339, or the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance. The ordinance was written by former councilor Alvin Dizon, who now sits as executive… link: City wants word out on anti-discrimination law.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 7th, 2018

Globe, De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde prepare for the Future of Learning

As an advocate for technology use in Philippine education, Globe Telecom joined hands with the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde (DLS-CSB) in launching a Research Grant for Digital Learning to prepare the country for the future of learning. To seal the partnership, a Memorandum of Agreement was signed between the two parties led by Michelle Tapia, Head of Strategy, Innovation, and Transformation of Globe myBusiness, and Br. Dennis Magbanua FSC, DLS-CSB President. Under the MoA, research grants will be used to fund two academic researches to be conducted by full-time DLS-CSB faculty who are screened after a rigorous selection process to promote further research in the fie...Keep on reading: Globe, De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde prepare for the Future of Learning.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Choosing the preschool discipline: play or work for U.N. agenda 30 for sustainable development?

Confronting the new K to 12 program that demands a continuum of learning from kindergarten to senior high school to match the U.N. Agenda 30 for Sustainable Lifelong Development, the Department of Education (DepEd) is still in the process of searching for the ideal preschool curriculum as its basis and its corresponding teacher training program......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

National Book Store College opens this school year 2018-2019

MANILA, Philippines — After over 75 years of supporting Filipinos’ education and lifelong learning, National Book Store is taking the next step by creating a.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 25th, 2018

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Apps keep local language, culture alive

As part of its advocacy of harnessing technology for education, PLDT wireless unit Smart Communications (Smart) recently launched its pool of mobile applications that promote literacy in the mother tongue......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 13th, 2018

Various sectors gather to promote Juvenile Justice Welfare Act

SAN FERNANDO CITY, Dec. 10 (PIA) -- With an aim to increase the level of awareness of duty-bearers, stakeholders, and the general public on the Juvenile Justice Welfare (JJW) Act or RA 9344, variou.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Various sectors gather to promote Juvenile Justice Welfare Act

SAN FERNANDO CITY, Dec. 10 (PIA) -- With an aim to increase the level of awareness of duty-bearers, stakeholders, and the general public on the Juvenile Justice Welfare (JJW) Act or RA 9344, variou.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

DepEd says no closure order vs Lumad school

MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Education (DepEd) clarified on Tuesday, December 4, that it did not order the closure of the Salugpongan Ta’Tanu Igkanogon Community Learning Center in Talaingod, Davao del Norte. The DepEd was responding to claims that it had ordered a shutdown of the school after some of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

DepEd denies ordering closure of IP schools

MANILA, Philippines --- The Department of Education (DepEd) on Tuesday denied allegations that it had ordered the shutdown of schools serving Indigenous Peoples (IP) in Mindanao. "The Department of Education (DepEd), through DepEd Region XI, confirms that it did not order the closure of any school serving Indigenous Peoples (IP) learners. This is in view of a recent claim that a Salugpongan learning center in the region was closed 'upon the orders of the Department,'" Deped said in a statement. DepEd Region XI, which covers the Davao Region, also clarified that the closure of Salugpongan Ta 'Tanu Igkanogon Community Learning Center in Davao del Norte was a decision by the IP commun...Keep on reading: DepEd denies ordering closure of IP schools.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 4th, 2018

Ex-UP top gunner Paolo Mendoza to Fighting Maroons: Focus on goal, not yourselves

After 21 years, the UP Fighting Maroons are on the cusp of entering the UAAP Finals as they battle against the Adamson Soaring Falcons for the right to face the defending champion Ateneo Blue Eagles for the Season 81 title.   A familiar situation 1997 was the last time UP made it to the Final Four, also forging a sudden death match for a spot in the Finals in Season 60. One of the top players back then was scoring sensation Paolo Mendoza, who is now the head coach of the UPIS Junior Fighting Maroons. Unfortunately, however, Mendoza's team lost by just a point, 69-70, during the Game 2 of the knockout match against the FEU Tamaraws, denying their march to the Finals. Being the top scorer and team leader of the Fighting Maroons at that time, Mendoza is elated to see the current team in the same position they had in 1997. In an exclusive interview, Mendoza said he is elated that UP finally made it again this far in the league, considering also that Juan and Javi Gomez de Liano, Diego Dario, and Wil Gozum were former UPIS Junior Fighting Maroons.   Defensive intensity Mendoza stressed that offense has always been and will always be there as the roster has top gunners like the Gomez De Liano brothers, Paul Desiderio, Jun Manzo, and MVP favorite Bright Akhuetie. However, he believes the team’s defensive intensity was the most obvious improvement compared to their performance during the first round of playoffs. “Magaling ‘yung attention and commitment nila sa defense. Ang galing ng ginawa ni Coach Bo (Perasol),” he said, adding that the boys definitely executed even the smallest of details in their defense. Being optimistic for today’s game, Mendoza thinks that the main concern or probable weakness of the team will be nothing and no one but themselves. “Sometimes in situations like this, you will be overwhelmed. Your focus on the game will really be tested,” he said, adding that focus is just what might probably get in the way in getting the win in today’s match.   Similarities with 1997 team Meanwhile, the major similarity that Mendoza thinks there is between their team during Season 60 and the current Fighting Maroons is the commitment of the players. “‘Yung similarity na talagang nakikita ko is ‘yung commitment ng parehong generations. During our time, very committed kami sa goal namin, the same way how the team is committed now,” he said. Reminiscing the exact situation they were in during Season 60, Mendoza is certain that they were still successful during their time despite falling short against the FEU Tamaraws, who were then the number one team in the standings and had the that twice-to-beat edge. “Ang maganda siguro sa team namin noon, we know our roles and we accept those roles. We respect each other a lot. Kaya masasabi naming naging matagumpay noong time namin,” he said.   Like an ordinary game The old cliche that is  “playing one game at a time” was the mindset of Mendoza during that do-or-die game against FEU. Mendoza admitted that he actually just treated that game as an ordinary game as he did not want to pressure himself so much. “During times like this, medyo iseseparate mo muna ‘yung sarili mo sa mundo kasi everybody’s talking about the game - your friends, family, and the whole UP community,” he said. Difficulties will always be present during crucial knockout games and Mendoza admitted it was really the focus on the game, which was very hard for them back then. “Sometimes, you tend to focus on yourself eh; nakakalimutan mo na yung goal ng team that is why importante ‘yung may leaders who know how to gather the team,” he said, adding that when you are already one of the top teams you always have to bring your “A" game” every time. Knowing how to handle pressure In sharing his learnings from his experience as a veteran player, Mendoza stressed that each one on the team now should know how to handle the pressure and expectations. “They should not take their eyes off the goal. Dapat alam nila ‘yung kailangan nilang gawin. Most importantly, they should think of everybody, the whole UP community sacrificing their time to support the team,” he said. Mendoza also pointed out that the performance of GDL brothers Juan and Javi is very crucial. “I think sila ang barometer ng UP. If they play well, strong ang chance ng UP to win,” he said. When asked what the Finals picture is for UP, Mendoza confidently said that his hopes are high for the very talented team. With the way the boys play, there is a very high chance that they will make it into Finals. They just need to maintain it and keep it a notch higher on defense. “Hindi talaga ako magugulat kung manalo ang UP. If it happens, first Finals appearance ulit ng UP in years,” he said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 28th, 2018

WEEKLY REFLECTIONS | Doing theological education following Jesus’ Example

“The harvest is large, but there are few workers to gather it in. Pray to the owner of the harvest that he will send out workers to gather in his harvest.”- Matthew 9:37-38.....»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsNov 27th, 2018

EU leaders to sign off historic Brexit deal

BRUSSELS, Belgium – European Union leaders meet Sunday, November 25 to approve a historic Brexit deal, which British Prime Minister Theresa May said would deliver her country a "brighter future.” At a special summit in Brussels that was almost derailed by a row over Gibraltar, the other 27 leaders will gather ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 25th, 2018

High school grad at 90: WWII stalled his studies, not his dreams

  NUEVA VALENCIA, Guimaras --- It was in March 1941 when he graduated from A. Marisol Elementary School in Mandurriao, Iloilo City.   He was all set for continued studies --- until the flames of World War II spread to the Asia-Pacific region in December that year.   His academics sidelined for 77 years, Jose Gaitan Gandeleca finally got to finish junior high school on Nov. 17, earning a certificate he can frame and proudly hang on his wall.   The Department of Education (DepEd) has confirmed that "Tatay Jose," 90, was the oldest passer of the accreditation and equivalency (A&E) test under the Alternative Learning System (ALS), the DepEd pr...Keep on reading: High school grad at 90: WWII stalled his studies, not his dreams.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 24th, 2018