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Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource: philippinetimes philippinetimesJun 14th, 2018

Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Education leaders gather to promote lifelong learning

QUEZON CITY, June 13 (PIA) - Education leaders from the country convened for a high level policy forum at the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education OrganizationRegional Center for Educational Innovat.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Globe, De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde prepare for the Future of Learning

As an advocate for technology use in Philippine education, Globe Telecom joined hands with the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde (DLS-CSB) in launching a Research Grant for Digital Learning to prepare the country for the future of learning. To seal the partnership, a Memorandum of Agreement was signed between the two parties led by Michelle Tapia, Head of Strategy, Innovation, and Transformation of Globe myBusiness, and Br. Dennis Magbanua FSC, DLS-CSB President. Under the MoA, research grants will be used to fund two academic researches to be conducted by full-time DLS-CSB faculty who are screened after a rigorous selection process to promote further research in the fie...Keep on reading: Globe, De La Salle–College of Saint Benilde prepare for the Future of Learning.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Choosing the preschool discipline: play or work for U.N. agenda 30 for sustainable development?

Confronting the new K to 12 program that demands a continuum of learning from kindergarten to senior high school to match the U.N. Agenda 30 for Sustainable Lifelong Development, the Department of Education (DepEd) is still in the process of searching for the ideal preschool curriculum as its basis and its corresponding teacher training program......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

National Book Store College opens this school year 2018-2019

MANILA, Philippines — After over 75 years of supporting Filipinos’ education and lifelong learning, National Book Store is taking the next step by creating a.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 25th, 2018

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Learning doesn’t stop for Geje Eustaquio—inside and outside ONE cage

MACAU---There are two goals that Geje Eustaquio wants to achieve in the foreseeable future, one of which involves attaining a feat outside of the ONE Championship cage. Eustaquio, the ONE interim flyweight champion, holds a Master's diploma in Physical Education from University of the Cordilleras and he doesn't just want to become the full title holder but he also wants to pursue a higher degree of learning. The 29-year-old Team Lakay member said he wants to either get a Doctorate or take up Law. READ:ONE: Eustaquio puts Moraes on crosshairs "It's going to be between a Doctor's degree or a Law degree, we will see but I cannot say for now," said Eustaquio Thursday after ON...Keep on reading: Learning doesn’t stop for Geje Eustaquio—inside and outside ONE cage.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

ONE: With title responsibilities, Geje Eustaquio’s pursuit for further learning has been put on hold

For Team Lakay flyweight star and reigning interim ONE Flyweight champion Geje Eustaquio, life is a continuous learning process. Already the holder of a Master’s Degree in Physical Education, the Baguio native admitted that he’s looking to even further expand his range of learning by either taking law or going for a Doctor’s Degree. The former teacher however admitted, that being an interim champion in Asia’s biggest mixed martial arts promotion is pretty time consuming, thus likely putting his schooling on hold. “It’s gonna be between a doctor’s degree or a law degree. We will see, I cannot say for now, most especially when you’re holding an interim belt, the responsibility is a bit harder.” Eustaquio said. “Kung before I train two, three rounds, now I train four, five, six rounds. It’s kinda tough. It’s on hold for now.” Saturday night at the Studio City Events Center in Macau, China, Eustaquio has the chance to elevate his world title status from interim to undisputed when he challenges reigning ONE Flyweight World Champion Adriano Moraes in a title unification bout. If Eustaquio pulls it off, he will carry the responsibility of being a world champion, and will have a target on his back. This could very well push his academic aspirations back even further. “Actually mas mahirap mag-isip na naman if I become the undisputed champion, because once again, sabi nga ni Spiderman, with great power comes great responsibility, so I have to maintain that belt and train more to maintain that belt.” But for someone who already has a Master’s Degree and is an accomplished mixed martial artist, what’s the motivation behind wanting to go back to school? For Geje, it’s pretty simple. “Life is learning.” “It doesn’t mean that when you have a degree, it’s so you can work, or you can have a better job. It’s about learning. When I have my doctor’s degree, it’s a long run of learning. When I have my law degree, it’s also a learning. For me, I treat as, everyday I learn, that’s why I go into this.” Eustaquio added.   Geje Eustaquio and Adriano Moraes battle of the undisputed ONE Championship Flyweight World Title at ONE: Pinnacle of Power, Saturday, June 23rd at the Studio City Events Center in Macau, China.  Catch it LIVE starting at 11:00 PM on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23! .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Accept ALS graduates, HEIs urged

The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) has urged higher education institutions (HEIs) to accept the applications of students who completed the Alternative Learning System (ALS) program of the Department of Education (DepEd)......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

DepEd eyes good manners and right conduct class

The Department of Education (DepEd) wants to add good manners, right conduct and proper values to students' learning as it sets a review of the 2-year-old curriculums in all grade levels under.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Part 2: What is your education worth?

In my previous column , I introduced a newly released book called The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. It was prompted by evidence that increasing specialization in learning has resulted in an education that is narrow and fragmented. I have noticed ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

PBEd flags need to strengthen link between education and job readiness

EDUCATION advocacy group Philippine Business for Education (PBEd) flagged the need for improved quality of learning to empower Filipinos joining the work force. The post PBEd flags need to strengthen link between education and job readiness appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 13th, 2018

Manila City Jail inmates graduate from high school – Manila Video

The Education Department’s alternative learning system was created to help Filipinos who have fallen off the formal education system. Aside from DepEd teachers, jail officers and some detainees also share their skills to help inmates. source link: Manila City Jail inmates graduate from high school – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018

ALS completers allowed to pursue higher education

Completers of the Alternative Learning System (ALS), who undertook the old basic education curriculum before the implementation of the K to 12 program and passed the high school accreditation and equivalency (A&E) test, are now eligible candidates for higher education this school year. “The work with ALS never stops; and….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

What is your education worth?

With the opening of classes, we now again see the sea of students trouping to places that will get them under the spell of a formal learning mode. Or at least that is what we all hope would happen. But beyond the mad rush to buy school supplies and ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

$3 billion pledged for girls education at G7

LA MALBAIE, Canada – Pledges worth nearly $3 billion to help vulnerable women and girls, including refugees, get an education were announced at a G7 summit on Saturday, June 9. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau , who hosted his fellow leaders at a Quebec resort, called it "the single ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 10th, 2018

School bag, locker check proposal to be tackled

Education officials and the leaders of Metro Manila’s police force are set to meet tomorrow to discuss a proposal to allow surprise inspection of student bags and lockers in schools as part of the government’s anti-illegal drug campaign......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 9th, 2018

School bag, locker check proposal to be tackled

Education officials and the leaders of Metro Manila’s police force are set to meet tomorrow to discuss a proposal to allow surprise inspection of student bags and lockers in schools as part of the government’s anti-illegal drug campaign......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 9th, 2018

Israel in uproar over Argentina pre-World Cup friendly snub

By Aron Heller, Associated Press JERUSALEM (AP) — The sports-crazed nation of Israel was in uproar Wednesday over Argentina's abrupt cancellation of a World Cup warmup match following pro-Palestinian protests, with some of the country's leaders accusing Lionel Messi and his teammates of caving to terrorism. Israel was eagerly awaiting the sold-out international friendly scheduled for Saturday night at Jerusalem's Teddy Kollek Stadium and the arrival of some of the world's best players. Argentina is one of the most popular national teams among Israelis and fans had been scrambling to get a chance to see Messi in person. But after a fierce Palestinian campaign, which included images of Argentina's white and sky-blue striped jersey stained with red paint resembling blood and threats to burn Messi posters, Argentina's football federation announced it was skipping the event. Claudio Tapia, president of the Argentine Football Association, apologized for cancelling the match but said the safety of the players was at stake. "What has happened in the last 72 hours, the actions, the threats that have occurred have led us to take the decision not to travel," he said during a news conference in Barcelona, where the Argentine team is training prior to the start of the World Cup next week. "(We) apologize to the Israeli community. It's nothing against the Israeli community, the Jewish community and I would like everyone to take this decision as a contribution to world peace," he said. "In the end, they've done the right thing, and this is behind us," Argentina striker Gonzalo Higuain told ESPN. "Health and common sense come first. We felt that it wasn't right to go." Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Argentine President Mauricio Macri and urged him to intervene, to no avail. Later Wednesday, Israel's Sports Ministry said a "negotiation" about the match was underway, perhaps in hopes of salvaging it, but gave no further details. "It's unfortunate the soccer knights of Argentina did not withstand the pressure of the Israeli-hating inciters, whose only goal is to harm our basic right to self-defense and bring about the destruction of Israel," said Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman. "We will not yield before a pack of anti-Semitic terrorist supporters." The head of the Palestinian football association, Jibril Rajoub, had called on Arab soccer fans to burn Messi posters and T-shirts if he participated. He has long tried to get soccer's world governing body, FIFA, and the International Olympic Committee to impose sanctions against Israel. Rajoub believes Israel should be punished for restricting movement of Palestinian players, and for forming teams in West Bank settlements. Rajoub had also objected to holding the match in Jerusalem, whose eastern sector the Palestinians claim as their capital. Although the Kollek stadium is in west Jerusalem, it is located in a neighborhood built where a Palestinian village once stood before it was destroyed in the war surrounding Israel's independence in 1948. Following the move, he held a press conference in Ramallah featuring a picture of him with Messi and a sign reading: "From Palestine, thank you Messi." Rajoub had accused Israel of playing politics with the game, by moving it from its original location in Haifa to Jerusalem, and by trying to link it to celebrations surrounding Israel's 70th anniversary. He called it a victory for "ethics and values" of sports. "They tried to use sport as a tool for political ends, and for this I think, they failed," Rajoub said. Israeli President Reuven Rivlin said it was a sad morning for Israeli sports fans, including his own grandchildren. "But there are values that are greater than even Messi. The politicization of the Argentinean move worries me greatly," he said. Opposition figures, however, accused Israel's headline-seeking sports minister Miri Regev of bringing on the politicization of the sporting event by insisting on moving the game from Haifa to contested Jerusalem and by trying to orchestrate a politicized photo-op with Messi. Israel captured east Jerusalem in the 1967 Mideast war and annexed the area in a move that is not internationally recognized. Israel considers the entire city to be its capital, while the Palestinians seek east Jerusalem as the capital of a future state. Regev rejected the backlash at a press conference Wednesday evening saying "there is no bigger lie" than claims her decision to hold the match in Jerusalem aided in its cancellation. She said the Argentinians had not objected and that Messi himself had wanted to visit sacred Christian and Jewish sites in the holy city. Regev said the match was canceled following "threats by terror elements sent to Messi and his family and to other players." Opposition leader Isaac Herzog called the snub a "spectacular own goal" by Regev that delivered victory to boycotters of the Jewish State. Labor Party leader Avi Gabbay called for a police investigation into Regev's "corrupt conduct." "We just absorbed a shot in the face. This is not just sports," he tweeted. "This, unfortunately, could start an international tsunami." Regev claimed that "terrorist" groups had made threats against Argentina's players and their families, sending them images of dead children, though she gave no further evidence. She accused members of the Israeli parliament, or Knesset, of backing the boycott advocates. "Unfortunately, we have Trojan Horses in the Knesset who give headwind to terrorism," she said. The Palestinian militant Islamic group Hamas praised Argentina for canceling the game. Spokesman Husam Badran said Hamas "applauds" the move and reiterated its position that rejects "all forms of normalization" with the Jewish state. A senior official at the Argentine Football Federation said the national team decided to call off the match with Israel after receiving threats from Hamas. The official, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity due to safety concerns, did not provide evidence or details of the alleged threats. A Hamas official mocked reports that the group had threatened the players, calling them unrealistic, and saying they don't deserve a comment. The Hamas official was not authorized to comment in the issue and also spoke on condition of anonymity. Hamas is sworn to Israel's destruction and has ruled Gaza with an iron fist since it took over the territory in 2007. Israel and the United States consider it a terror organization for its bombings, shooting and rocket attacks targeting civilians. Israel has largely fended off the boycott campaign with only a small number of artists and organizations shunning the country. Argentina's snubbing would appear to be the boycott movement's greatest achievement thus far. The grassroots movement advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a way to promote Palestinian rights through nonviolent means. Israel says the campaign goes beyond Israeli occupation of lands claimed by the Palestinians and masks a deeper aim of delegitimizing or even destroying the country. It has formed a government ministry whose primary mission is to combat the boycott movement. The Argentinean move, which featured on the front pages of all the major Israeli dailies, raised fears that it could serve as a template for future boycotts of Jerusalem, most notably next year's scheduled hosting of the popular Eurovision song contest. The Palestinians celebrated the cancellation as a major triumph. Israeli organizers said an offer had been floated to have the game played in Barcelona instead, but it was highly unlikely. "I think sports should never be involved with politics," said Shahaf Ashraga, a fan in Jerusalem. "It just makes me sad to think that the game has to be canceled because of the Palestinian pressure." Argentina opens its Group D campaign in Russia against Iceland on June 16. It then plays Croatia on June 21 and Nigeria on June 26. It is unclear whether Argentina will play another warmup, or if it will arrive in Moscow ahead of schedule. ___ Associated Press writers Debora Rey and Victor Caivano in Buenos Aires, Argentina, contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

PSC Women Congress

MORE than 200 notable women leaders, public officials, athletes and sports leaders of the country are set to gather for the launching of the Philippine Sports Commission Women’s Sports Congress on June 14-15 at the Century Park Hotel. PSC Commissioner Celia Kiram will spearhead the two-day conference that will tackle….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 6th, 2018