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Heady mix of sounds in John Legend’s PH stopover

Sometimes, you want to get lost in love; bathe in it till it overflows," singer-songwriter John Legend said from the Smart Araneta Coliseum stage at the recent Manila stop of his "Darkness and Light" concert tour. "And sometimes, you want to forget what's going on around you." John lamented that, these days, there are people who have a deeper relationship with their mobile phones than their lovers. "Sometimes, you got to turn them off. We get so obsessed with 'likes' that we forget about love," he continued in a flirtatious singsong. "But tonight, we're going to focus on love." His little spiel didn't exactly dissuade the audience from hoisting their phones up. But, at l...Keep on reading: Heady mix of sounds in John Legend’s PH stopover.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerApr 9th, 2018

Jerry West: This game is going to overtake all the other sports

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LOS ANGELES – Jerry West’s longevity is surpassed only by his excellence, which is surpassed only by his credibility, which is surpassed only by his legacy, which is surpassed only by his continued relevancy, which is surpassed only by his humility, which is surpassed only by his longevity... Aw, you get the idea. The man known as “Zeke From Cabin Creek” early in his NBA playing days, as “Mr. Clutch” by the time he was putting the finishing touches on a Hall of Fame career and as “The Logo” for much of the league’s past half century got credit for only 81 steals in the 14 seasons he played for the Los Angeles Lakers from 1960-1974. The reason: that stat only got tracked starting in West’s farewell season. But he racked up No. 82 by stealing the show with his acceptance speech of the NBA’s Lifetime Achievement Award presented at the annual All-Star “Legends Brunch” at the L.A. Convention Center. West’s appreciation of NBA history, gratitude for his place in it, optimism for the game’s future and competitive fire all shone through when he stood before the audience filled with both his peers – some of the greatest players ever – and fans sampling for the first time one of All-Star Weekend’s most reliable highlights. Three months shy of his 80th birthday, West – who won one NBA title as a player, eight more as an executive with L.A. and Golden State, and as a consultant now to the Clippers, had input into that team’s blockbuster trade of star Blake Griffin – was one of four former Lakers honored per the brunch program’s tradition of recognizing men who associated with the host city. James Worthy received the Global Ambassador Award, Bill Walton was presented with the Hometown Hero Award and Magic Johnson was named the 2018 Legend of the Year. In introducing West, NBA commissioner Adam Silver said: “One thing people know about Jerry is, he pulls no punches. And so, Jerry is someone I know I can count on. When there’s things happening in the league, Jerry will tell me exactly what I should know about today’s game and what’s happening with today’s players.” West used some of his time on stage, though, to acknowledge and thank a fifth Los Angeles legend: HOFer Elgin Baylor. In fact, he got emotional, pausing to collect himself while praising his former teammate and dear friend, long considered one of the most underrated players in NBA history. Baylor got to the Lakers two years before West, before they left Minneapolis, and was an 11-time All-Star from 1958 to 1971 who still ranks third all-time at 27.4 points per game. “Elgin, I won’t ever forget the way you treated me when I came here,” he said to Baylor, who was seated at a nearby table. “Amazing player but more amazing man. I remember when I was in college, never being able to watch the game, no TV, and of course we didn’t have one in my house. But I used to hear about this guy and I thought ‘Oh my God, I’m going to have a chance to play with him.’ “He’s my hero. I used to watch him practice, I’d watch him out of the corner of my eye. Just the way he conducted himself with people. Just one classy man.” West talked up others in the room whose lives he touched, and both lauded and encouraged current NBA players in their performances and in their commitments off the court. “You can be leaders because you have a voice. Don’t ever pass that up. Don’t ever lose your voice,” he said. “I really believe in humility. I also believe in civility.” After talking about the NBA’s astounding growth over the run of his equally astounding career, West’s competitiveness flickered through once more. “I’m going to say this – and I don’t like to say things that are controversial – but this game is going to overtake all the other sports,” he said. Comedian Billy Crystal, a long-suffering Clippers fan, opened the program with a hoops-themed monologue. “When I first started going to Clippers games, there was me, [broadcaster] Ralph Lawler and the players,” Crystal said. “A triple-double meant there were three couples in the stands. ... Watching all of this talent, I was glued to my seat – because that’s the way the Clippers would keep you from leaving.” Crystal provided some imagery when he likened pro basketball’s legendary stars to great musicians. “Wilt in jazz terms was a big band. He was powerful, huge, big brass section,” Crystal said. “Then Elgin came into the league and his style changed the way the game was played. ... He was cool, improvisational jazz. Then came the Big O [Oscar Robertson], who was the Dave Brubeck of basketball – easy but powerful and complex rhythms all at the same time. “That led the way to Dr. J [Julius Erving] and Kareem – Doc was [John] Coltrane, Kareem was Thelonious Monk with a little bit of Duke Ellington. ... Magic was unbelievable [and] brought us to Motown. Also, the country sounds of Mr. Larry Bird. Then came Michael – I can’t remember his last name but he played for the White Sox. He played to the beat of his own drummer. “Tim Duncan was not jazz; Tim Duncan was Beethoven. Then came the rappers, Shaq and [Allen] Iverson. And other virtuosos like Kobe [Bryant], LeBron [James] and Steph [Curry] and KD [Kevin Durant], [Russell] Westbrook. And the best goes on and on and on.” Silver, though, might have had the morning’s best line. In a shout-out to Magic Johnson – who has been fined $550,000 in the past six months for violating league tampering rules in talking publicly about Oklahoma City’s Paul George and Milwaukee’s Giannis Antetokounmpo – the commissioner said: “Magic, thank you for paying for the brunch today.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

UAAP: JLC learned to shoot like that from an NU legend

John Lloyd Clemente was white hot for National University all throughout their matchup against Far Eastern University on Sunday. “Actually, start of the game pa lang, nararadaman ko nang mainit ako e,” he told reporters after he dropped 38 points, the highest output from a player this season, in a losing effort. “Then start ng second half, ayun, hindi na ako nagmimintis. Nagulat na nga lang ako sa mga tira ko, lahat pumapasok e.” Along with a morale-boosting win for the already-eliminated Bulldogs, Clemente actually had a more personal goal in mind. “Last game kasi, first half pa lang, nakalimang three points na ako so sabi ko kay coach Jeff, ibe-break ko record mo. Ganun din ngayon,” he shared. The first-year player was referring to Jeff Napa, his former coach in Nazareth School of NU and who now serves as consultant for the school’s Seniors squad. Before being a coach, Napa once set a milestone, scoring 43 points built on a league record-tying 10 triples back in 2002. Fast forward 16 years and his milestone was put under siege in back-to-back games by Clemente. Last Wednesday, the scoring swingman had 19 points, 15 coming from five triples in the first half, and five days later, he dropped 38 points while scattering five triples. Safe to say, Clemente wasn’t able to match Napa’s firepower in a single game. “Kaya lang, ‘di ko na-break e. Yun talaga yung target ko sana e kaso ‘di ko magawa,” he said through chuckles. Interestingly, the man whose record Clemente is trying to break is the same man who has been his long-time mentor. “Si coach Jeff, parang tatay ko na rin yan. Siya talaga yung mentor ko,” he said, talking about their relationship which led to one championship in their time together with the Bullpups. And as it turns out, it’s actually Napa who has been overseeing Clemente’s transformation from a master of the midrange to a deep-range marksman. “Siya nagturo sa akin paano mag-shoot. Pagdating ko sa NU, ang pangit talaga ng shooting form ko tapos siya, nakita ko, ang ganda ng pitik niya,” the latter said. He then continued, “Tinanong ko teammates ko kung player ba siya dati tapos sabi nga nila na mag record nga raw siya. Mula pa noon, talagang tinuturuan na niya ako paano mag-shoot.” For being his mentor from then until now, Clemente is nothing but thankful for Napa. As he put it, “Si coach Jeff naman, alam kong gusto rin niya akong maging successful in the future.” That doesn’t mean, however, that Napa’s record is already safe. “May four years pa ako. Kaya pa yan,” Clemente said, restressing that he intends to go for the same milestone his mentor has. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 11th, 2018

Pinoy tennis legend Johnny Jose passes away at 81

Filipino tennis great John "Johnny" Jose Jr., an Asian Games gold medalist and a heralded coach of the women's national team has passed away due to natural causes last Tuesday at St. Luke's Hospital in Bonifacio Global City, Taguig. He was 81. Jose is the last Filipino to bag a gold medal in Asian Games tennis back in 1962 in Jakarta, Indonesia.  He also brought pride to the country by donning the national colors in the Davis Cup multiple times alongside the Deyro Brothers as well as Felicisimo Ampon, up until 1964. Jose started playing tennis at age six, and he never looked back. He was a semifinalist in the Wimbledon juniors, and won bronze in the Asian Games in 1958 to complete an all-Filipino podium finish before conquering the competition four years later. He became a successful mentor of Pinoy tennis talent as the women's national team head coach. He was also inducted into the De La Salle University Hall of Fame. Last 2013, he was given the International Tennis Federation Commitment Award for his longtime dedication to the sport. Jose is survived by his wife Ollie, 77, and his five children Ina, Juanchit, Annalisa, Fatima, and Magnolia Hotshots assistant coach Mon......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 24th, 2018

LOOK: Jr. NBA PH 2018 All-Stars get special send-off

Jr. NBA PH press release Oct. 8, 2018, Gatorade Hoops Center – Sixteen Jr. NBA All-Stars of the Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska got a special send-off this year from Alaska Milk the day before they left for their NBA Experience Trip to Shanghai, China. The eight boys and eight girls who topped the Jr. NBA National Training Camp last May underwent a basketball clinic conducted by NBA Legend Cherokee Parks and WNBA player Alana Beard, with US Ambassador Sung Kim in attendance. The All-Stars will play against counterpart Jr NBA All Stars from Vietnam, India, Thailand, Singapore and Jakarta during the trip, do city tours and watch an official preseason NBA game live between the Philadelphia 76ers and the Dallas Mavericks. They will be accompanied by Coaches of the Year Tata Belangel and Hazell Yambot. Above, L -R are: 1st row): Prince Ray Alao, Christian Joi Mesias, Nathan Jan Jundana, Kim Aaron Tamayo, Ethan Rod Alian, Seven Gagate, John Lester Amagan, Manuel Luis Antonio Pablo 2nd row): E-Cow, Marielle Vigno, Madelyn Flores, Christine Nichole Venterez, NBA Global Partnerships Director Mae Dichupa, Gin Kayla Huelar, Aishe Mae Solis, Amber Esquivel, Kyla Mataga, Pauline Angelique Valle, Jr. WNBA Coach of the Year Hazel Yambot 3rd row): Jr. NBA Coach of the Year Mark Belangel, Alaska Power Camp Head Coach Jeffery Cariaso, Alaska Milk Corporation Sports Development Head Richard Bachmann, U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines Sung Kim, former NBA player Cherokee Parks, 4-time WNBA All-Star and Los Angeles Sparks Guard/Forward Alana Beard Fans can follow Jr. NBA at the official website www.jrnba.asia and Facebook at www.facebook.com/JrNBAAsia to learn more about the program as well as how to join and become a Jr. NBA All-Star in 2018. To learn more about Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and www.playph.com......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 8th, 2018

Newly minted Emmy winner John Legend joins ‘The Voice’

FRESH off an Emmy Award win, John Legend is sticking with television and becoming a coach on NBC’s “The Voice.” Legend won an Emmy on Saturday as a producer of NBC’s “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert,” making him an EGOT—the term for someone who’s won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony award, a rare… link: Newly minted Emmy winner John Legend joins ‘The Voice’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

BLOGTABLE: Team with the biggest turnaround in 2018-19 will be?

NBA.com blogtable Which team do you predict will have the biggest turnaround in 2018-19? * * * David Aldridge: Memphis. The Grizzlies had a great offseason (as I detailed in my 1-30 summer rankings) and they could easily double their 22 wins from last season. Mike Conley, Jr.'s return is most important of course, but the infusion of both talent and toughness from both the Draft and free agency/trades will revitalize the team just as much. The Grizz no longer will be held hostage by Chandler Parsons' status on a given night; they should be able to go eight deep with ease going forward whether or not he can contribute. Tas Melas: The Grizzlies. They had a very solid under-the-radar offseason, adding Kyle Anderson, Garrett Temple, and Jaren Jackson Jr. But more importantly, they are getting back two of the best at their positions: Marc Gasol and Mike Conley. Yes, Gasol was there last season, but he was not himself with all the “T-word” that was going on. And Conley is one of the best guards in the game. The Grizz were 5-2 to start 2017-18 with Conley. Are you seriously bringing up the Grizzlies’ record after seven games?! I gotta remind people of how good their core is after a 22-win season. Before whatever last year was, Memphis made the playoffs seven straight seasons. Shaun Powell: The Memphis Grizzlies, by a hair over the Lakers. How can they not distance themselves from a 22-win season, especially with a healthy Mike Conley and a much better performance from Marc Gasol? And that doesn't mean the Grizzlies will make the playoffs, so let's keep it in the right context. But a leap of 15 or 17 wins sounds reasonable for a team that was a mess a year ago without Conley. John Schuhmann: LeBron James' last two moves produced win increases of 11 games with Miami in 2010-11 and 20 games with Cleveland in 2014-15, but those teams (were in the East and) added additional All-Stars (Chris Bosh and Kevin Love) who fit better with James than any of the other players that the Lakers added this summer. Still, L.A. has a young core that should be improved and is the only team that looks 10 wins better than it was last season. Memphis, with a healthy Mike Conley and the addition of some vets that will defend, has a chance. Sekou Smith: The Lakers.No one signals a shift in a team's fortunes the way LeBron James does. And adding him to the mix in Lakerland means the bottom line in L.A. is at least a double-digit improvement in the win column, if we're going by LeBron's track record when he relocates. The scrutiny on these Lakers should be epic, rivaling the traveling circus that was the Miami Heat in the first year of the "Heatles" (LeBron, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh) era. Think about the mix of youngsters and veterans the Lakers have put together and tell me they wouldn't make up the cast of the best reality show of all time. The drama should be non-stop and as robust as we've seen in any training camp in years. But if things hold true to the way LeBron has navigated both of his previous relocations, there's at least a 10-game improvement in the win column on the way as well......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

John Legend a win away from joining winners’ club

  With two Emmy nominations for his work in the live television version of "Jesus Christ Superstar," John Legend is one win away from joining the prestigious EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony) club, which includes such icons as Audrey Hepburn, Rita Moreno and Whoopi Goldberg. "If it happens, it would be a truly rare group of people to join," the singer-songwriter told the Vulture in a recent interview. A 10-time Grammy winner, John picked up a Tony for coproducing the revival of the musical "Jitney" and won an Oscar for composing the song "Glory" for the film, "Selma." "To do it with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice would be especially cool, given that this was thei...Keep on reading: John Legend a win away from joining winners’ club.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Witness the Meteoric Rise of a Legend in “Bohemian Rhapsody” Full Trailer Reveal

Brace for a rocking good time and sing your hearts out as the full trailer of “Bohemian Rhapsody” drops today on 20th Century Fox’s Youtube and Facebook pages. “Bohemian Rhapsody” is the story of how Freddie Mercury and his fellow band members Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon formed Queen – one of the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

NU Bullpups to wear the flag in 2018 Asean School Games

Not even a month after playing for Batang Gilas in the 2018 FIBA Under-17 World Cup, Gerry Abadiano, Terrence Fortea, and Carl Tamayo will be playing for flag and country anew in the 2018 Asean School Games. The three national youth team players banner the Philippine team represented by Nazareth School of National University in the regional meet scheduled for July 19 to 27 in Malaysia. Earlier in the month, Abadiano, Fortea, and Tamayo were key cogs for Batang Gilas who registered the country’s best finish in the FIBA U17 Worlds at 13th place. Now, heady guard Abadiano, streaky shooter Fortea, and versatile big man Tamayo will be joined by Harold Alarcon, Aaron Buensalida, Vince Cuajao, Dom Dayrit, John Felicida, Cyril Gonzales, Kevin Quiambao, Joshua Ramirez, Reyland Torres. Of course, multi-titled mentor Goldwyn Monteverde will be calling the shots for Team Philippines backed by Freego. NU was awarded the right to represent the Filipinos after winning the 2018 Palarong Pambansa earlier in the year. They will be competing against the best young talent Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand have to offer. In the girls tournament, Chiang Kai Shek College, supported by SM, will be defending its title. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 18th, 2018

Mike Bryan wins Wimbledon for 17th Slam, 1st without brother

By HOWARD FENDRICH ,  AP Tennis Writer LONDON (AP) — Mike Bryan found himself a suitable backup partner for Wimbledon and the result was a record-tying 17th Grand Slam men's doubles title — and his first without his twin brother. Bryan teamed with Jack Sock for only their second tournament together, and the American duo edged Raven Klaasen of South Africa and Michael Venus of New Zealand 6-3, 6-7 (7), 6-3, 5-7, 7-5 on Saturday night in the final at Centre Court. The 40-year-old Bryan is the oldest man in the Open era to win the doubles title at the All England Club. He won his first 16 major championships, which included three others at Wimbledon, with his twin, Bob, who is sidelined right now because of a hip injury. "I want to dedicate this title to him, because I'm sure he's watching on TV," Bryan said in an interview with the BBC after the victory, mentioning that their grandfather passed away recently. Sock also mentioned Bob in his post-match remarks, saying: "The tour misses him. He's a legend and icon in tennis. I'm just filling in here for one of the greatest of all time." This is Sock's second Wimbledon title. He paired with Vasek Pospisil to defeat the Bryans in the 2014 final. "There was one guy I was going to play doubles with in this tournament, and it would be Mike Bryan, half of the greatest doubles team," Sock said. The final lasted 3½ hours and began with the retractable roof open, then ended with it shut for the last set. When Klaasen and Venus — who were trying to win their first Grand Slam title — held a set point in the fourth, Bryan was called for a foot fault on a second serve. That meant he double-faulted, giving the set away and forcing a fifth. There were about 20 minutes of daylight left, and Sock said: "I'm good to call it for the night. I can't see." The decision was made to close the dome and turn on the artificial lights, so the match could continue until its conclusion. The key break came with Klaasen serving at 5-all, when he pushed a volley long after Sock sent a big forehand right at him. Bryan then served out the victory. John Newcombe is the only other man in tennis history with 17 Grand Slam doubles trophies. The most he won with one partner was 12, though. The Bryans' 16 as a pair is a record. They had played doubles with each other in a record 76 consecutive major tournaments until Bob missed the French Open in May. Mike entered Roland Garros with Sam Querrey, and they lost in the first round. Mike then played at a grass-court tuneup with Sock last month, their only event before Wimbledon. "It feels like we're getting better every match," Mike said. "We're starting to jell. If Bob can't come back, we'll play this summer.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

RJ Abarrientos u-turns from plan to play one year in NCAA Jrs.

RJ Abarrientos will remain in Far Eastern University – whether or not he makes it into the Seniors Team A for UAAP Season 81. “Wala naman pong problema sa akin kung mag-Team B muna ako. Napag-usapan din naman kasi namin ni tito na dapat tapusin ko yung paglalaro ko rito sa FEU,” the nephew of Philippine basketball legend and Tamaraw pride Johnny Abarrientos shared. In the last three years, RJ has been starring for the Baby Tamaraws in the UAAP Juniors. Last season, he averaged 13.8 points, 5.6 rebounds, and 4.8 assists to help his team make the playoffs before they fell to University of Sto. Tomas in the stepladder. He committed to FEU Seniors early this year, but with a glut of guards already entrenched in Morayta such as speedster Jasper Parker, scorer Wendell Comboy, heady Axel Inigo, versatile RJ Ramirez, and prized recruit L-Jay Gonzales, his place in Team A for the upcoming collegiate wars was yet to be made certain. That is why the now 18-year-old, already over the UAAP Juniors’ age limit, was mulling a short stint in the NCAA Juniors. There, he would have been able to play one more season as the league’s age limit is 19. As reported by Reuben Terrado of spin.ph, Abarrientos had an offer to suit up for powerhouse Mapua High School. As it turns out, though, defending champion and rising power College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills was also in play for his services. However, after much thought, the 5-foot-11 guard has decided to stay put in FEU. “Blessed naman ako kasi maganda na yung nasimulan ko as a Tamaraw. Ito na yung inspirasyon ko going to college,” he said. And whatever happens, he will wear no color other than green and yellow. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Clooneys open wallets as celebrities attack family separations

NEW YORK, USA – George Clooney and John Legend have sent hefty donations to charity and Bruce Springsteen interrupted his Broadway show to decry the border crisis as the entertainment world voiced outrage over the separation of migrant families at the US border. Clooney and his lawyer wife Amal said that they ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Meet the 2018 batch of Jr. NBA PH All-Stars

Jr. NBA PH press release PASAY CITY, METRO MANILA – Eight boys and eight girls were named as Jr. NBA Philippines All-Stars from a total of 74 participants during the Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska National Training Camp to become the eleventh batch of Jr. NBA All-Stars. Headlined by Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein and WNBA Hall of Famer Sheryl Swoopes, the National Training Camp was held at the Gatorade Hoops Center on May 18, at Don Bosco Technical Institute on May 19 and SM Mall of Asia Music Hall on May 20. The National Training Camp players were the top performers in Regional Selection Camps in Bacolod, Baguio, Butuan, Metro Manila and Alaska Power Camp, which were led by Jr. NBA Coaches Carlos Barroca and Rob Newson, together with Alaska coaches led by PBA Legend Jeffrey Cariaso. Jr. NBA alumni were in attendance throughout the camp with Thirdy Ravena and Ricci Rivero visiting the Gatorade Hoops Center and Kai Sotto and Rhayyan Amsali highlighting the participants of the Jr. NBA Alumni All-Star Game in SM Mall of Asia. The Jr. NBA All-Stars showcased skills on the court and exemplified the Jr. NBA core S.T.A.R. Values of Sportsmanship, Teamwork, a positive Attitude, and Respect. Prince Ray Alao, 14, of San Beda University; Ethan Rod Alian, 14, of La Salle Greenhills; John Lester Amagan, 14, of St. Robert’s International Academy of Iloilo; Seven Gagate, 14, of Chiang Kai Shek College; Nathan Jan Jundana, 14, of Bacolod Tay Tung; Christian Joi Mesias, 14, of Jose Maria College of Davao; Kim Aaron Tamayo, 13, of National University; and Rhon Khaniel Telles, 13, of St. Anthony de Carmelli Academy of Cavite topped the boys division, while Madelyn Flores, 14, of Bukidnon National High School; Gin Kayla Huelar, 13, of St. La Salle University, Bacolod; Aishe Solis, 13, of Corpus Christi School in Cagayan De Oro; Pauline Angelique Valle, 13, of Misamis Oriental General Comprehensive High School; Christine Nichole Venterez, 12, Baguio City National High School; Marielle Vingno, 14, of Escuela de Sophia of Caloocan Inc.; Amber Esquivel, 14, and Kyla Marie Mataga, 13, of De La Salle Zobel were the outstanding performers in the girls’ division. Pauline Angelique Valle and Prince Ray Alao were named this year’s Jr. NBA Most Valuable Players while Marielle Vingno and Ethan Rod Alian were selected as Alaska Ambassadors. Hazel Yambot of Baguio and Mark “Tata” Belangel of Bacolod were chosen as the Coaches of the Year. In addition, special awards were handed out to Kayla Marie Mataga and Javier Louis Jugo as Gatorade Hustle awardees, Merylle Cuasay and Czarlo Salvador as Panasonic Rising Stars, and Aishe Solis and Kim Aaron Tamayo, Cloudfone Awesome Players of the Game. “The Jr. NBA program gives us the opportunity to contribute to our goal of getting more kids to play the game of basketball and help them understand how working hard on their craft can open doors and unlock greater opportunities in life,” said Hall of Famer Sheryl Swoopes.  “I came here to inspire you but your passion and eagerness to learn inspire me and I’m so grateful for that,” shared Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein to the campers. An NBA experience trip in Shanghai, China awaits the All-Stars in October where they will be joined by other Jr. NBA All-Stars from Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam in training and friendly competitions as they catch the NBA China Games 2018 featuring the Philadelphia 76ers and the Dallas Mavericks. Jr. NBA Philippines presented by Alaska, the league’s global youth basketball participation program for boys and girls, continues to promote proper nutrition and an active lifestyle, serving as an effective platform in implementing Alaska Milk’s NUTRITION.ACTION.CHAMPION. program that helps address the issue of overweight and undernourished children in the country. AXA, Cloudfone, Gatorade, Globe Telecom and Panasonic serve as Official Partners of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines, while Spalding is a Supporting Partner. ABS-CBN Sports + Action, Basketball TV and NBA Premium TV are the Official NBA Broadcasters of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines. Fans can also follow Jr. NBA at www.jrnba.asia/philippines and on Facebook. For all the latest news and updates on the NBA, visit www.nba.com and follow the league on Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and follow PlayPH at www.playph.com and on Facebook and Twitter......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2018

John Legend-starring ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ slated for DVD release

John Legend-starring ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ slated for DVD release.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 30th, 2018

‘A Quiet Place’ sounds off with huge $50 million debut

By Rebecca Rubin LOS ANGELES, (Variety.com) – “A Quiet Place” was looking to make noise at the weekend box office, and it delivered. Paramount Pictures’ thriller directed by John KrasinskiThe post ‘A Quiet Place’ sounds off with huge $50 million debut appeared first on DZRH News......»»

Category: newsSource:  dzrhnewsRelated NewsApr 9th, 2018

John Legend: ‘Manila was so much fun’

MANILA, Philippines — “Manila was so much fun tonight!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

John Legend’s night of love

By Michelle Anne P. Soliman Concert Review Darkness and Light Asia John Legend AS THE seats continued to be filled with guests, the lights dimmed at half past eight. A band — percussionist, a saxophone player, two trombone players, and three female backup singers — set the jazzy mood onstage. It was John Legend’s second […] The post John Legend’s night of love appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2018

Goldwin Monteverde staying with Bullpups; UE still without a coach

Coming from a loss in the UAAP Juniors Finals to Ateneo de Manila High School, Nazareth School of National University will be back next season bigger, brighter, and better than ever. While Michael Malonzo, Robert Minerva, and Migs Oczon will be graduating, the Bullpups will be welcoming with open arms 23 for ’23 Gilas cadet Carl Tamayo, heady guard Gerry Abadiano, and mobile big Kevin Quiambao. Add to that battle-tested returnees in versatile wing Rhayyan Amsali and scoring dynamo Terrence Fortea. More importantly, however, the boys from Sampaloc will still have the head coach who made it all happen. Asked if he’s staying on with NU Juniors, Goldwin Monteverde answered, “Yes.” He then continued, “Mag-stay ako rito kasi may commitment ako rito. Kailangang tapusin kasi mahirap naman yung biglang aalis.” This is the first time the so-called master recruiter spoke about his job status with the Bullpups. A month ago, reports broke out that Monteverde was leaving and heading to University of the East. The development, and later clarification, was first reported by Reuben Terrado of spin.ph. With this categorical statement, however, the NU faithful can rest assured that their high school program remains in good hands. Monteverde made his name in the high school ranks, leading Chiang Kai Shek to multiple titles as well Adamson High School and NU to contention. Along with his on-court results, he also has an impressive track record in terms of player recruitment and development with the likes of Gerry Abadiano, John Galinato, Migs Oczon, Encho Serrano, Carl Tamayo, and Jonas Tibayan having blossomed under his tutelage. Meanwhile, the development also means that the Red Warriors are still without a head coach. UE has been searching for a new head coach after former mentor Derrick Pumaren handed in his resignation late last year. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 21st, 2018

John Legend unapologetic for mixing art with politics

  John Legend doesn't concern himself with trends. As a musician, he has always "stayed in my own lane"---sultry, soulful R&B tunes rendered with a baritone as smooth as butter. And he likes things that way. Yes, there have been changes here and there, but the most discernible of which isn't necessarily the music itself, but the message the songs carry. For instance, John's latest album, "Darkness and Light," is perhaps his most political yet; a piece of work that seemingly fuses two sides of him---the decorated crooner and the everyday guy who doesn't shy away from sharing his opinions. In a time when artists are being told to stick to what they do for a living,...Keep on reading: John Legend unapologetic for mixing art with politics.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 20th, 2018