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[OPINION] The press owes society courage

Note: This is the speech of Marty Baron, executive editor of The Washington Post, after receiving on Thursday, June 13, the Canadian Journalism Foundation 's Special Citation "in recognition of his extraordinary contribution and fearless approach to journalism." Rappler CEO and executive editor Maria Ressa was also honored by CJF ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerJun 15th, 2019

All media events before, after Lakers-Nets in Shanghai cancelled

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press In response to the NBA defending Daryl Morey’s freedom of speech, Chinese officials took it away from the Los Angeles Lakers and Brooklyn Nets. All of the usual media sessions surrounding the Lakers-Nets preseason game in Shanghai on Thursday — including a scheduled news conference from NBA Commissioner Adam Silver and postgame news conferences with the teams — have been canceled. It’s the latest salvo in the rift between the league and China stemming from a since-deleted tweet posted last week by Morey, the general manager of the Houston Rockets. “There will be no media availabilities for tonight’s game between the Brooklyn Nets and Los Angeles Lakers,” the NBA said in a statement Thursday, released a few hours before the game. The game was to proceed as scheduled. “I understand that there are consequences from that exercise of, in essence, his freedom of speech,” Silver said at a news conference in Tokyo earlier this week. “We will have to live with those consequences.” And this move was one of those consequences. Morey’s tweet expressed support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong, and sparked fallout that has completely overshadowed the NBA’s annual trip to China — which typically takes on a celebratory tone. Not this year. Most events in advance of the game, such as NBA Cares events to benefit educational causes and the Special Olympics, were called off, as was a “fan night” where Lakers and Nets players were to interact directly with some Chinese ticketholders. Signage in Shanghai to promote the game — huge photos of LeBron James, Anthony Davis, Kyrie Irving and other players — was ripped down, and mentions of the game were scrubbed from the arena website. All that comes as many Chinese corporations suspended their business ties to the NBA. China state broadcaster CCTV said it was not going to show the Lakers-Nets games on Thursday or in Shenzhen on Saturday, and NBA broadcast partner Tencent also said it was changing its coverage plans for the league. Silver said earlier this week that Rockets great Yao Ming, a Basketball Hall of Famer and now the president of the Chinese Basketball Association — which has also suspended its ties with Houston as part of the Morey tweet fallout — is angry as well. “I’m not sure he quite accepts sort of how we are operating our business right now, and again, I accept that we have a difference of opinion,” Silver said. “I also think that as part of our core values, tolerance is one of those as well. I think tolerance for differing societies’ approaches, tolerance for differing points of view and the ability to listen. Certainly I don’t come here, either as the commissioner of the NBA or as an American, to tell others how they should run their governments.” In the U.S., there was governmental reaction as well leading up to the game. On Wednesday in Washington, a bipartisan group of lawmakers — including the rare alignment of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York — sent a letter to Silver saying the NBA should show the “courage and integrity” to stand up to the Chinese government. They asked the NBA to, among other things, suspend activities in China until what they called the selective treatment against the Rockets ends. “You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government’s targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it,” the lawmakers told Silver. The Rockets were extremely popular in China, largely because of Yao. But the team’s merchandise has been taken off e-commerce sites and out of stores selling NBA apparel in the country, murals featuring the team’s stars and logo were painted over and even the Chinese consulate office in Houston expressed major displeasure with Morey and the Rockets. Morey has been silent on the matter since a tweet Sunday where he attempted to make some sort of amends with the Chinese. “I have always appreciated the significant support our Chinese fans and sponsors have provided and I would hope that those who are upset will know that offending or misunderstanding them was not my intention,” he wrote Sunday. “My tweets are my own and in no way represent the Rockets or the NBA.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 10th, 2019

OPINION | How is press freedom personal ?

OPINION | How is press freedom personal ?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolstandardRelated NewsMay 9th, 2020

US women s team players have options after setback in court

By ANNE M. PETERSON AP Sports Writer Players for the U.S. women’s national team may have been dealt a blow by a judge’s ruling in their gender discrimination lawsuit against the U.S. Soccer Federation but the case is far from over. The women have vowed to keep up the fight, encouraged by the likes of Joe Biden, Billie Jean King and even the men's national team. “This is just a setback,” King said when asked what she would tell the team. “There’s so many of these ups and downs. Just keep learning from it, keep going for it. You’re still such a great influence, not only in soccer, but for equality for everyone.” King, who was calling for equitable prize money in tennis in the 1970s, once famously proclaimed: “Everyone thinks women should be thrilled when we get crumbs, and I want women to have the cake, the icing and the cherry on top, too.” The players sued the federation last year, claiming they have not been paid equally under their collective bargaining agreement to what the men’s national team receives under its labor deal. They asked for more than $66 million in damages under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The federal judge threw out the players' claim of discriminatory pay Friday in a surprising loss for the defending World Cup champions. U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner said the women rejected a pay-to-play structure like the men's agreement and accepted greater base salaries and benefits. But he allowed aspects of their allegations of discriminatory working conditions to go forward. The trial remains scheduled for June 16 in federal court in Los Angeles. Players have vowed to appeal the judge's decision. There are several legal options. Players could seek to overturn Friday's decision at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and could even discuss with the USSF the possibility of a joint application for a stay pending appeal. They could proceed with a trial limited to working conditions such as flights, hotels and medical staff, then appeal Friday's ruling. Or the sides could seek to settle, perhaps as part of a deal to replace and extend the current collective bargaining agreement, which expires on Dec. 31, 2021. Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, went to Twitter this weekend to encourage the players. “To @USWNT: don’t give up this fight. This is not over yet. To @ussoccer: equal pay, now. Or else when I’m president, you can go elsewhere for World Cup funding,” he posted, referring to the 2026 men’s World Cup, set to be hosted by the United States, Mexico and Canada. The players’ association for the men’s national team also released a statement Monday expressing support. “For a year and a half the USMNT players have made proposals to the federation that would achieve equal pay for the USMNT and USWNT players,” the statement said. “We understand the WNT players plan to appeal last week’s decision and we support them.” Steven A. Bank, a professor at UCLA, said he was expecting Klausner's decision on the summary judgment to focus the case but not to the degree it did. “Frequently, judges will do that in order to narrow down the issues, but because it also spurs the parties to settle by essentially using a heavy hand and saying, ‘Hey, a lot of these things you have is fluff, so let’s get rid of this, and neither of you have as great a case that you think you do.' So I’m not surprised that there was some level of summary judgment granted and some level denied,” he said. “But I was surprised that the judge came down with what is a fairly complete victory for U.S. Soccer.” In an appearance on ABC's “Good Morning America” on Monday, Megan Rapinoe said she was shocked by the decision. She pointed out the women’s team was far more successful than the men, winning consecutive World Cup titles and playing more games. “If I earn $1 every time I play, and a man earns $3, just because I win 10 games and he only wins three games, so I made $10 and he made $9, I’m not sure how that’s me making more money, while having to essentially win everything we could’ve possibly won over these last two years: two World Cups and just about every game we’ve played,” Rapinoe said. “For me, it missed the point, and was very disappointing, to be honest.” Attorney Hampton Dellinger, who represented players in a battle over artificial turf at the 2015 World Cup in Canada, said the case will take time to play out. “Obviously, I think it’d be great if the parties could reach a reasonable settlement,” Dellinger said. “But to my mind, if the legal fight is going to continue, I don’t think the judge’s first word is necessarily going to be the last word.” Arguments could be made that the team has already made it's case in the court of public opinion. Following the U.S. victory in the World Cup final last year in France, the crowd chanted "Equal Pay" as the players celebrated on the field. The women also drew support from some of U.S. Soccer's most high-profile sponsors when the federation argued in court documents that the women lacked the skills and responsibilities of their male counterparts. The so-called scorched earth argument led to the resignation of USSF President Carlos Cordeiro, who was replaced by former national team player Cindy Parlow Cone. “I think it’s great that they brought the case forward, because I think any visibility into this issue is just going to help further the cause, because it’s going to make more people sensitive and aware that the issue of unequal pay persists in all spectrums of our economy," said Mary Ellen Carter, an associate professor of accounting at Boston College. "I happen to know it well in the executive space, but it’s not only there. So I think the courage that they had to come forward with the suit keeps the issue at the forefront, and I think that that’s important.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 5th, 2020

300 PH scientists, conservationists call for a culture of care for nature

This is a press release from Masungi Georeserve In an open letter ahead of the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day, a group of 300 environmentalists called on present and future leaders to put nature on top of the agenda as Philippine society adjusts to a “new normal” following the COVID-19 crisis. “The ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020

'The Last Dance” featuring Michael Jordan and Chicago Bulls to air on Netflix outside of the US starting April 20

March 31, 2020 – Today it was announced that the premiere of “The Last Dance,” the highly anticipated 10-part documentary series will air on ESPN in the U.S. on Sunday nights over five weeks from April 19 through May 17. The series will also be available outside of the U.S. on Netflix. The series, directed by Jason Hehir (“The Fab Five,” “The ’85 Bears,” “Andre the Giant”), chronicles one of the greatest icons and most successful teams in sports history, Michael Jordan and the 1990s Chicago Bulls, and features never-before-seen footage from the 1997-98 season as the team pursued its sixth NBA championship in eight years. ESPN statement: “As society navigates this time without live sports, viewers are still looking to the sports world to escape and enjoy a collective experience. We’ve heard the calls from fans asking us to move up the release date for this series, and we’re happy to announce that we’ve been able to accelerate the production schedule to do just that. This project celebrates one of the greatest players and dynasties ever, and we hope it can serve as a unifying entertainment experience to fill the role that sports often play in our lives, telling a story that will captivate everyone, not just sports fans.” In the fall of 1997, Michael Jordan, Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf and head coach Phil Jackson agreed to let an NBA Entertainment film crew follow the team all season long. The result would be a remarkable portrait of an iconic player and a celebrated team – a portrait only now being revealed, more than two decades later, in “The Last Dance.” As the series weaves its way through the tumultuous 1997-98 season, viewers will be transported back to how it all began – from Jordan’s childhood roots, the Bulls’ dire circumstances before his arrival and how the team was built after drafting him in 1984, to the struggles that eventually led to the team’s first NBA championship. As the series takes the audience through the Bulls’ first five championships, viewers will experience the off-court challenges, struggles and triumphs that were a part of the culture-shifting phenomenon created by Jordan and the Bulls. It’s an unlikely scenario that serves as a fascinating backdrop for the inside tale of the 1998 championship run, with extensive profiles of Jordan’s key teammates including Scottie Pippen, Dennis Rodman and Steve Kerr, head coach Phil Jackson, and featuring dozens of current-day interviews with rivals and luminaries from basketball and beyond. All throughout, the tension and conflict that defined that final championship run are very much on display. “Michael Jordan and the ‘90s Bulls weren't just sports superstars, they were a global phenomenon,” said director Jason Hehir. “Making ‘The Last Dance’ was an incredible opportunity to explore the extraordinary impact of one man and one team. For nearly three years, we searched far and wide to present the definitive story of an era-defining dynasty and to present these sports heroes as humans. I hope viewers enjoy watching our series as much as we enjoyed the opportunity to make it.” The result is one of the most fascinating sports documentary series ever produced – a series viewers won’t want to miss. The full episodic documentary will air on ESPN in the U.S. and on Netflix outside of the U.S. as follows: ESPN Sunday, April 19 9 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 1 10 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 2   Sunday, April 26 7 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 1 8 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 2 9 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 3 10 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 4   Sunday, May 3 7 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 3 8 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 4 9 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 5 10 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 6   Sunday, May 10 7 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 5 8 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 6 9 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 7 10 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 8   Sunday, May 17 7 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 7 8 p.m. ET - Re-air of “The Last Dance” Episode 8 9 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 9 10 p.m. ET - Premiere of “The Last Dance” Episode 10   NETFLIX (outside of the U.S.) Monday, April 20 - 12:01 a.m. PT (3:01 p.m. Philippine Standard Time) - “The Last Dance” Episodes 1 and 2 Monday, April 27 - 12:01 a.m. PT (3:01 p.m. Philippine Standard Time) - “The Last Dance” Episodes 3 and 4 Monday, May 4 - 12:01 a.m. PT (3:01 p.m. Philippine Standard Time) - “The Last Dance” Episodes 5 and 6 Monday, May 11 - 12:01 a.m. PT (3:01 p.m. Philippine Standard Time) - “The Last Dance” Episodes 7 and 8 Monday, May 18 - 12:01 a.m. PT (3:01 p.m. Philippine Standard Time) - “The Last Dance” Episodes 9 and 10 Immediately following each episode’s linear ESPN premiere, it will be available to authenticated subscribers on the ESPN App via mobile and connected TV devices, ESPN.com and ESPN on Demand via cable, satellite and DMVPD distributors. Additional programming updates will be forthcoming. Please continue to check @ESPNPR, ESPN Press Room and Netflix Media Center for updates.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 31st, 2020

[OPINION] Why we fear: Risk, society, and the coronavirus

Yesterday, the government in Beijing voiced its displeasure at countries that had banned travelers from the mainland. A spokesperson for China’s foreign ministry criticized countries that went against the recommendations of the World Health Organization against canceling flights, adding that it “sowed panic among the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2020

[OPINION] Asia s Winners and Losers in 2019: From K-Pop sensation BTS to the beleaguered people of Hong Kong

In years past, the Philippines has been no stranger in our annual rankings of who had it good and who had it bad as we put the spotlight on Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte in 2015 and on the growing challenge to press freedom in 2018.   As ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 1st, 2020

Federer says a star s legacy isn t at risk with late decline

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Roger Federer arrives for his interview at the precise appointed time, steering his white sedan into a parking spot in an industrial area dotted by art galleries about 15 minutes from his luxury apartment in this home-away-from-home. After obliging a selfie request from someone on the street, Federer makes his way up to a second-story loft area and sits. He crosses his legs, kneads his right calf and winces. “Just started training. I'm surprised I could walk the stairs as good as I have,” Federer says with a laugh. “My calves are, like, killing me. Just getting back into it. The shock on the body is, I don't want to say 'immense,' every time, but I've been on vacation for two weeks. The shock just hits you hard.” Ah, the ravages of age. Federer, who won the first of his men's-record 20 Grand Slam titles when he was 21 and now is 38, explains to The Associated Press that he must “go back to the drawing board” after “just missing out on The Big One,” a reference to his fifth-set tiebreaker loss to Novak Djokovic in the Wimbledon final in July. So all of just two days into Federer's preparation for next season -- he flies to Melbourne on Jan. 9, a week before the Australian Open draw -- he is taking a 48-hour break, sitting out his two-a-day fitness sessions and not lifting a racket. No one this old has won a Grand Slam title in the professional era. As a younger man, Federer says, he didn't allow himself such a respite, working six or eight days in a row to get going. But now? The “waves,” he calls them, making an undulating motion with his famous right arm -- time on, then time off -- offer his body a chance to recover. They also let him “go through the wall” on the day before a rest period, because “otherwise, you maybe would hold back just ever so slightly, because you just don't know how you're going to feel the next day.” Federer recognizes that continuing to play tennis at a high level long past the age when many greats of the past were done (his idol, Pete Sampras, competed for the final time at 31) means he repeatedly faces questions -- from fans, from the media, from those around him -- about how long he will continue on tour. And while he can't provide a definitive answer -- because, quite simply, he says he doesn't have one -- Federer is willing to discuss this aspect of the subject: He does not consider it important to walk away at the top of his game and the top of his sport. When he's told about a newspaper opinion piece from way back in 2013 -- 2013! -- that posited he should quit then to avoid ruining his legacy, Federer just smiles and waves his hand. He knows, of course, that he's managed to reach another seven Grand Slam finals since the start of 2014, winning three. But he also says the notion that an older athlete could harm his or her status by hanging around too long is nonsense, no matter what the decline looks like. “I don't think the exit needs to be that perfect, that you have to win something huge ... and you go, 'OK. I did it all.' It can be completed a different way, as long as you enjoy it and that's what matters to you," Federer says. “People, I don't think, anyway, remember what were the last matches of a John McEnroe, what were the last matches of a Stefan Edberg. Nobody knows. They remember that they won Wimbledon, that they won this and that, they were world No. 1. I don't think the end, per se, is that important.” That doesn't mean, of course, that he isn't as competitive as ever or doesn't want to win a 21st major championship -- above all, No. 9 at Wimbledon, after it slipped away despite two match points in 2019 -- or his first Olympic singles gold at the Tokyo Games next year. Or win any tournaments, for that matter, which would push him closer to Jimmy Connors' professional era record of 109 trophies (Federer has 103). He's still good enough, after all, to be ranked No. 3 — having spent a record 310 weeks at No. 1, he is currently behind No. 1 Rafael Nadal and No. 2 Djokovic — and to go 53-10 with four titles this season. If it seems as though the rest of the world is insisting it needs to know when and how retirement will arrive, Federer says it's not something on which he expends a lot of energy. Not anymore, anyway. “I mean, I don't think about it much, to be honest,” Federer says. “It's a bit different (now) that I know I'm at the back end of my career. But I feel like I've been toward 'the back end of my career' for a long, long time.” So much so that when he got sick while on a skiing trip in January 2008 with what eventually was diagnosed as mononucleosis, he vowed to stay off the slopes, a decision he stuck to, although not without some regret. His children -- twin daughters, 10, and twin sons, 5 -- all ski, and he and his wife, Mirka, have a home in a resort in his native Switzerland. Yet Federer sticks to his role as “the chief 'getting the kids ski-ready' operator guy.” “I was like, 'OK, you know what? That's a sign. I'm going to stop skiing, because I don't want to get hurt at the back end of my career. Maybe I have another four good years left in me. This was (12) years ago now. So it shows you how long ago I've been thinking: 'Maybe I have another four years. Maybe I have another three years. Maybe I have another two years.' ... I've been on this sort of train for long enough for me not to actually think about it a whole lot,” he says. “But sure, sometimes with family planning, discussions with my wife, we talk a little bit sometimes. But never like, 'What if?' Or, 'What are we going to do?' Because I always think, like, we have time for that and then we'll figure it out when that moment comes." Even his agent, Tony Godsick, who has represented Federer since 2005, raises the topic. “It would help make my job easier,” Godsick says in a telephone interview. “I don't want to know for my own personal travel. Or I don't want to know to have the scoop before anyone else. I want to know so I can plan. ... I mean, he won't go on a retirement tour, but I'd like to have some advance notice, maybe throw some more cameras around when he's out playing, so we can capture some more footage.” Godsick pauses, then spaces out the next five words for emphasis: “But. He. Really. Doesn't. Know.” “I really do think he has the flexibility to actually not decide ... until he feels like it's the time. And that will come when Mirka says, 'I can't do it anymore,' and 'I can't be on the road with the kids,' and 'The kids are not enjoying it.' Or his body might say, ‘Hey, Rog, stop pushing me so hard,'” Godsick says. “Maybe it's a time when he realizes on the practice court he doesn't either have the motivation or the ability to get better. And at that point, then maybe he says, 'I certainly have squeezed all the juice out of this lemon in terms of innovating and getting better.' And I don't think that time is there yet. Which is good news.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 19th, 2019

Chinese TV pulls Arsenal game coverage after Ozil criticism

By Rob Harris, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — Chinese television pulled coverage of Arsenal's Premier League match against Manchester City on Sunday after Mesut Ozil, a forward for the London club, criticized Beijing's brutal mass crackdown on ethnic Muslims in the country. China is the Premier League's most lucrative overseas broadcast market, with the rights sold for $700 million in a three-year deal that runs through 2022. But instead of the sports channel of Chinese state television showing Ozil featuring in Arsenal's 3-0 loss to City, it scheduled a delayed recording of Tottenham's 2-1 victory over Wolverhampton from earlier Sunday, according to information from the network. Streaming service PPTV.com also also canceled a feed of Arsenal's match which featured Ozil for almost an hour before he was substituted amid cheers and some jeers from his own fans. Ozil reacted by kicking his gloves on the touchline. “How he reacts is up to him and I'll deal with it,” interim Arsenal manager Freddie Ljungberg said. “We'll see what it means for the future but of course we want players to behave the right way.” Ljungberg would not discuss the specifics of Ozil's social media post from Friday which embroiled Arsenal in controversy in China. “The China thing is political," Ljungberg said, “and I’ll leave that to the club.” Arsenal used a post on Chinese social media network Weibo to dissociate itself from Ozil's action. “The content he expressed is entirely Ozil's personal opinion,” the north London club said. “As a football club, Arsenal always adheres to the principle of not being involved in politics.” Ozil added to condemnation of the detention of more than 1 million Uighurs and other minorities in so-called reeducation camps in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang, where they are subjected to political indoctrination, torture, beatings, and food deprivation, as well as denial of religious and linguistic freedom. A social media post from Ozil on Friday denounced China for burning Qurans, closing mosques and the killing of religious scholars. The Arsenal player complained that “Muslims stay quiet.” The Chinese Football Association expressed "great indignation and disappointment" at Ozil's comments, according to the Global Times newspaper published by the ruling Communist Party. China's government increasingly uses the threat of loss of access to the country's growing market as leverage to try to control what companies, universities and others say or do abroad about political issues. Arsenal will be hoping to avoid the backlash faced by the Houston Rockets earlier this year after the NBA team's general manager, Daryl Morey, tweeted support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong, angering fans and officials in China. The tweet was deleted soon after it was posted, and Rockets owner and billionaire casino and restaurant owner Tilman Fertitta quickly rebuked his GM with a tweet saying that Morey does not speak for the team. The tweet caused some Chinese corporations to suspend relationships with the NBA. There is a growing a backlash in China against Ozil, who is Muslim of Turkish descent. “I think he is very wrong," lawyer Chen Wangshu said in Beijing. “As a sportsman, his most important responsibility is to do his job well, or to play good football.” In 2018, Ozil quit Germany’s national team following criticism over his decision to pose for a picture with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. “He should be responsible for his career and refrain from making any comment raising and inciting anger in other nations," Chen said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2019

Mavs may have to face East beasts minus injured star Doncic

By Schuyler Dixon, Associated Press DALLAS (AP) — The timing couldn’t be much worse for the Dallas Mavericks to be without star guard Luka Doncic. The reigning rookie of the year sprained his right ankle in the opening minutes of a 122-118 overtime loss to Miami, the first of five straight games for the Mavericks against the teams that entered Sunday (Monday, PHL time) with the five best records in the Eastern Conference. Dallas coach Rick Carlisle said he didn’t expect Doncic to play Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) in Milwaukee against reigning MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo, although he stressed it wasn’t a medical opinion. X-rays were negative. The rally from a 24-point deficit to a four-point lead late in the fourth quarter against the Heat was probably the most encouraging thing to happen to the resurgent Mavericks this season. But the reality was they still lost and have games against East contenders every other day through next Sunday (next next Monday, PHL time). Three of the remaining four are on the road. “It’s going to be opportunities, a lot of touches for a lot of people,” said guard J.J. Barea, who played in just six of the first 24 games but figures to have more nights like his 12 points in 13 minutes against the Heat as long as Doncic is sidelined. “Just got to be ready. With him here, with him not here, we’ve still got to start the games better.” Doncic was coming off the latest of many eye-opening games this season. A former teenage star in Spain, the Slovenian wowed the crowd in Mexico City with a pre-game speech in flawless Spanish before scoring 41 points with 12 rebounds and 11 assists in a 122-111 win over Detroit. Two nights later, the 20-year-old was on the ground between rows of fans behind a basket less than two minutes into the game, clutching his ankle after landing on the foot of Miami’s Kendrick Nunn on a drive. Doncic had left the arena, presumably to get an MRI, and wasn’t available to comment after the game. “Obviously, we lose a guy that’s a great player,” Carlisle said. “We don’t know for how long. We got to circle the wagons with the guys that we have and play like we did in the second half. Pretty simple.” Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 18 of his 28 points in the second half, including several clutch 3-pointers. But he was shut out in overtime, getting just one shot and missing a 3. Kristaps Porzingis, the other half of Dallas’ star European pairing along with Doncic, had 22 points and 14 rebounds. But the 7-foot-3 Latvian missed badly on two shots late in overtime to finish 7 of 21 from the field and gave up an offensive rebound in a one-point game after Jimmy Butler missed two free throws with nine seconds left in the extra period. The Bucks will take an 18-game winning streak into Monday’s (Tuesday, PHL time) game. Dallas then plays Boston at home before trips to Philadelphia and defending NBA champion Toronto. “Just like we did today, the second half,” Hardaway said of the mindset minus Doncic. “But we have to be like that for the whole 48. It’s not going to be easy.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2019

Media as partners in legislation

  THIS week has been specially memorable for the provincial media. Amid the challenges they face and the dangers that come with the territory, hundreds converged in Kalibo and Boracay to at­tend the 24th PAPI National Press Congress. PAPI, which stands for Publishers Associations of the Philippines, Inc., is a robust society that embrac­es practically […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsDec 5th, 2019

QCinema 2019 movie reviews: Babae at Baril , Cleaners, and Kaaway sa Sulod

Babae at Baril review: An exciting and enticing work It doesn’t just take exquisite skill to make a film like Babae at Baril. It takes courage.  Its depiction of a society brimming with toxic patriarchy is both exhaustive and exhausting, in the sense that it doesn’t skirt ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

NBA postpones media sessions in Shanghai amid China rift

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press NBA Commissioner Adam Silver told the Brooklyn Nets and Los Angeles Lakers on Wednesday that the league is still expecting them to play as scheduled this week, even while the rift between the league and Chinese officials continued in ways that clearly suggested the two planned games in Shanghai and Shenzhen were anything but guaranteed. The NBA called off scheduled media sessions Wednesday for both teams. At least two other NBA events to be held Wednesday before the start of the China games were canceled as part of the fallout that started after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey posted a since-deleted tweet last week that showed support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong. "Given the fluidity of the situation, today's media availability has been postponed," the league said. They were not rescheduled Wednesday, though having them on Thursday — game day in Shanghai — remains possible. Later Wednesday in Washington, a bipartisan group of lawmakers — including the rare alignment of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York — sent a letter to Silver saying the NBA should show the "courage and integrity" to stand up to the Chinese government. They asked the NBA to, among other things, suspend activities in China until what they called the selective treatment against the Rockets ends. "You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government's targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it," the lawmakers told Silver. The NBA did not have any immediate comment on the letter, and it was unclear if Silver had even seen the document. In Shanghai, the mood surrounding the game that — if played — will feature LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and other big NBA names was anything but festive. An NBA Cares event that was to benefit the Special Olympics was called off, as was a "fan night" celebration that was to be highlighted by the league announcing plans to refurbish some outdoor courts in that city. And workers in multiple spots around Shanghai were tearing down large outdoor promotional advertisements for Thursday's Lakers-Nets game. The teams are also supposed to play Saturday in Shenzhen. Chinese smartphone maker Vivo has joined the list of companies that have suspended ties with the NBA for now, only adding to the uncertainty surrounding the China games. Vivo was a presenting sponsor of the Lakers-Nets games, and on Wednesday there was no reference to the game in Shanghai on the list of upcoming events scheduled at Mercedes-Benz Arena. Other firms such as apparel company Li-Ning announced similar moves earlier this week, as the rift was just beginning. Silver said Tuesday in Tokyo that he supports Morey's right to free speech. Several Chinese companies have suspended their partnership with the NBA in recent days, and Chinese state broadcaster CCTV said it will not broadcast the Lakers-Nets games. "I'm sympathetic to our interests here and to our partners who are upset," Silver said. "I don't think it's inconsistent on one hand to be sympathetic to them and at the same time stand by our principles." All around China, stores that sell NBA merchandise were removing Rockets-related apparel from shelves and many murals featuring the Rockets — even ones with Yao Ming, the Chinese great who played for Houston during his NBA career — were being painted over. Effects were even felt in at least one NBA arena Tuesday night. In Philadelphia, where the 76ers were playing a Chinese team — the Guangzhou Loong Lions — two fans were removed by arena security for holding signs and chanting in support of Hong Kong. The signs read "Free Hong Kong" and "Free HK." The sentiment was not different from Morey's since-deleted tweet last week of an image that read, "Fight For Freedom. Stand With Hong Kong." The 76ers and Wells Fargo Center, the team's home arena, released statements Wednesday confirming that the fan removal took place and explaining why. "During the second quarter of last night's 76ers game, Wells Fargo Center security responded to a situation that was disrupting the live event experience for our guests," the arena's statement said. "After three separate warnings, the two individuals were escorted out of the arena without incident. The security team employed respectful and standard operating procedures." The NBA is not the first major corporation to deal with criticism from China over political differences. Mercedes-Benz, Delta Air Lines, hotel operator Marriott, fashion brand Zara and others also have found themselves in conflicts with China in recent years. After Morey's tweet was deleted, Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta said Morey does not speak for the organization. Joe Tsai, who recently completed his purchase of the Nets and is a co-founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, has said the damage to the NBA's relationship with China "will take a long time to repair." ___ Reynolds reported from Miami. AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston in Philadelphia and Associated Press writer Yanan Wang in Beijing contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 9th, 2019

Salazar kicked out of worlds after 4-year doping ban

By Eddie Pells, Associated Press DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Track coach Alberto Salazar, who trained four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah, along with a gold medalist and other top contenders at this week's world championships, has been kicked out of the competition after being handed a four-year ban in a case long pursued by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. USADA said in a news release early Tuesday that an arbitration panel decided on the four-year penalty for Salazar and endocrinologist Jeffrey Brown for, among other violations, possessing and trafficking testosterone while training top runners at the Nike Oregon Project (NOP). Brown did consulting work for the NOP and was a personal physician for some of the runners. Among the seven runners listed as members of Salazar's team are Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands, who won the 10,000-meter gold medal on Saturday night, and is entered to run later this week in the 1,500; and Donavan Brazier and Clayton Murphy of the U.S., each of whom are scheduled to run in the 800-meter final Tuesday. The USADA ban went into effect Monday, and track's governing body, the IAAF, moved quickly to revoke Salazar's credential for the final six days in Doha. In a statement released by NOP, Salazar said he was shocked by the arbitration outcome, and that he would appeal. He said throughout a six-year investigation, he and his athletes "endured unjust, unethical and highly damaging treatment from the USADA." "The Oregon Project has never and will never permit doping," Salazar said. The existence of the long-running USADA investigation became public after a 2015 report by BBC and ProPublica that detailed some of Salazar's practices, which included use of testosterone gel and infusions of a supplement called L-carnitine that, when mixed with insulin, can greatly enhance athletic performance. Distance runner Kara Goucher and a former NOP coach, Steve Magness, were among the witnesses who provided evidence for the case. USADA said it received information from 30 witnesses. Goucher left NOP in 2011, and in the ProPublica piece, she called Salazar a "sort of a win-at-all-costs person and it's hurting the sport." Farah, who runs for Britain, worked with the Nike Oregon Project while he was racking up six world and four Olympic championships. During that period, UK Athletics did its own investigation into Salazar and gave Farah the OK to continue working with him. Farah parted ways with Salazar in 2017, saying he wanted to move back home. On Tuesday, Farah released a statement saying he has "no tolerance for anyone who breaks the rules or crosses a line." Salazar also coached 2012 Olympic silver medalist Galen Rupp, who in the past has strongly denied any wrongdoing. USADA said it relied on more than 2,000 exhibits between the two cases and that proceedings included nearly 5,800 pages of transcripts. "The athletes in these cases found the courage to speak out and ultimately exposed the truth," USADA CEO Travis Tygart said. "While acting in connection with the Nike Oregon Project, Mr. Salazar and Dr. Brown demonstrated that winning was more important than the health and wellbeing of the athletes they were sworn to protect.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 1st, 2019

Maria Ressa to U.S. journalists: What happened to PH can happen to you

TEXAS, USA – The esteemed US-based Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) on Saturday, September 7, honored Rappler CEO Maria Ressa and 3 other journalists for their courage and contribution to the profession.  In her speech, Ressa called on American journalists to protect democracy amid ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2019

Rosanna Roces on CR issue

  ROSANNA Roces has aired her sentiments on the issue of gender neutral restrooms. The actress is married to a lesbian, Blessy Arias, for years now, so it’s quite natural for the press to asked about her opinion on the matter. “Masyado lang pinalaki. Blown out of proportion na pwedeng pag-usapan na lang,” she said […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsSep 6th, 2019

Patriots Way has often been a bust elsewhere

By Steven Wine, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — On a sweltering August morning early in training camp, Miami Dolphins first-year coach Brian Flores made a mistake. It was a mental lapse involving the defense, the sort of thing he rails against every day. And so Flores did what his players do as punishment in such situations, sprinting across the field into the corner, slapping a wall designated for the acknowledgement of mistakes in practice and then hustling back to rejoin his team. "I'm going to lead by example," Flores said. OK, so maybe he's not a Bill Belichick clone. But how far does Flores fall from the Belichick coaching tree? The answer could determine whether the Dolphins win with their new coach, a longtime New England Patriots assistant. The Dolphins hired Flores even though the Patriots' Way tends to be a dead end for other teams. While the Pats are six-time Super Bowl champions under Belichick, his former New England assistants have combined for one playoff victory as NFL head coaches. "You can't replicate what they have up there, right?" former Patriots tight end Dwayne Allen said. "A lot of people have tried and failed." That group includes former head coaches Romeo Crennel, Eric Mangini and Josh McDaniels in the NFL, and Charlie Weis at Notre Dame and Kansas. The jury is still out on two second-year head coaches with New England backgrounds: former Belichick assistant Matt Patricia (6-10 with the Lions last year) and ex-Patriots linebacker Mike Vrabel (9-7 with the Titans). Add to that sextet the somewhat successful Bill O'Brien (43-41 entering his sixth season with the Texans, but only 1-3 in the playoffs), and their combined winning percentage is .430, compared with Belichick's .741 in New England. Some suspect Belichick's proteges have tried too hard to Be Like Bill. "There have been mistakes," said former Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi, who spent nine seasons playing for Belichick and is now an ESPN analyst. "When you try to clone Bill Belichick's style and it's not who you are, it's going to come off as disingenuous. You're not going to feel real to players, and players can feel that. That mistake has been done in the past by his coaching tree." Patricia had a rocky first season in part because he sounded a little like Belichick during news conferences, snapping at questions and providing short answers that made him a punchline with pundits. Mangini was a control freak who was hard on his players with the Jets and Browns, and he got off to a bad start in Cleveland when he made rookies take a 10-hour bus trip to attend his youth camp. McDaniels wore a hoodie every day in Denver and yelled at his assistants. In sum, Belichick's proteges tend to mimic his unrelenting approach. And they tend to struggle. "They try to push it hard, and it's hard for certain players to grasp," Bruschi said. "Say you've been coddled. It can be a shock to the system when you're told to be somewhere at a certain time, stay until a certain time, work hard every second you're there and do things a certain way, which is a night-and-day difference from the previous head coach. Some of these coaches experience resistance, and it's hard to break that. You're reprogramming players on what winning football is." In Miami, Flores must reprogram a franchise that hasn't won a playoff game since 2000. He spent 15 seasons with the Patriots and hired two former Patriots assistants as his coordinators with the Dolphins. But Flores said the things he stresses — working hard, putting team first and being tough, smart and on time — don't make him a Belichick copycat. "There are a lot of high school coaches who are saying the exact same things," he said. "And pee wee coaches." Flores said his mentors make up a large group that includes his pastor, parents and high school coach, which suggests he's not trying to transform the Dolphins into the Patriots South. "The big thing about leadership is being authentic," Flores said. "So if you try to be someone else, it's not real leadership in my opinion. I've tried to take a lot from a lot of people, a lot of different leaders that I've come across. But at the end of the day, I've got to be me." It makes a good song. Allen, who spent time with the Dolphins this summer, believes it will make Flores a good coach. "You can't replicate what they have in New England, and coach Flores has done a great job of not trying," Allen said. "This is his ship, and he's going to run it his way." Dolphins players say Flores mixes a drill sergeant demeanor with a fondness for corny jokes. He's more forthcoming and expansive with the media than Belichick, but he has showed his no-nonsense side by firing an assistant less than a week into training camp and publicly criticizing receiver Kenny Stills' practice performances. Stills and left tackle Laremy Tunsil were traded Saturday to the Texans in a deal that netted Miami three high draft picks. As with most coaches, the real test for Flores will be how he handles defeat. Mantras about hard work and putting team first can sound hollow when a season sours. Or Flores can Be Like Bill and rarely lose......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 1st, 2019

Federer ends slow starts, rolls into fourth round at US Open

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — There was no slow start to this U.S. Open outing for Roger Federer, who bristled at the suggestion that he might have played a role in some favorable scheduling. After dropping the opening set in each of his initial two matches for the first time in 19 appearances at Flushing Meadows, the No. 3-seeded Federer was back at his absolute best Friday in a 6-2, 6-2, 6-1 victory over Dan Evans, accumulating a 48-7 edge in winners as the opening act in the Arthur Ashe Stadium day session that began at noon. Evans acknowledged 20-time major champion Federer's superiority. How couldn't he? But the 58th-ranked player from Britain also thought the timing was "a bit disappointing," because his rain-postponed second-round match was played Thursday, whereas Federer got to play Wednesday under the Ashe roof. Being first up on Friday's program meant Evans had to be back on court about 18 hours after he'd left the tournament grounds. "It was always going to be a competitive advantage for me. ... Luck was on my side," Federer said, although he did add that his team was asked about whether it had a preference for when to play. "But that doesn't mean, like, 'Roger asks, Roger gets.' Just remember that, because I have heard this (stuff) too often now," he said, with a more colorful word choice. "I'm sick and tired of it, that apparently I call the shots; the tournament and the TV stations do. We can give our opinion. That's what we do. But I'm still going to walk out (on court), even if they schedule me at 4 in the morning." Tournament spokesman Chris Widmaier would not discuss specifics of conversations between tournament officials and representatives of any player. "That was the schedule we put forth, and we're comfortable with the decision," Widmaier said. When a reporter asked Evans whether he made any requests about a later start time, he replied: "You think a guy who has my ranking has any say in that?" "There is probably about four people in this tournament who has a say when they play," Evans said. "Maybe three." Truth be told, this one could have been contested at any hour on any day and the outcome might not have changed. Evans has now faced Federer three times, each at a Grand Slam tournament, and lost all nine sets they've played. "I guess he has every shot," Evans said, "so it's not ideal to have an opponent that has every shot." Federer, who faces No. 15 David Goffin next, displayed a bunch of them, too. The leaping, over-the-shoulder volley packed with pace. The drop volley winners. The forehand passes. The serve with which he won 21 consecutive points in one stretch. The returns that accumulated 14 break points, converting half. Federer went from making 17 unforced errors in the first set of his previous match to finishing with 19 for the entire match against Evans. "You almost tend to forget what happened," Federer said, "and you move forward." That's exactly what Serena Williams did, too. She lost the opening set of her second-round match against 17-year-old Caty McNally before coming back to win, then was much better in a convincing 6-3, 6-2 victory over Wimbledon quarterfinalist Karolina Muchova. Williams seized control with a seven-game run that began after she trailed 3-2 at the beginning. "I knew what she could do," Williams said — after not allowing Muchova to do much. She'll face No. 22 Petra Martic on Sunday for a spot in the quarterfinals. Other women's winners Friday included No. 2 Ash Barty, No. 3 Karolina Pliskova and No. 16 Johanna Konta. Men who advanced included 2016 champion Stan Wawrinka and Alex de Minaur, who knocked off 2014 runner-up Kei Nishikori. In an all-American matchup under the lights in Ashe later Friday, No. 10 Madison Keys faced No. 20 Sofia Kenin. That was to be followed by defending champion Novak Djokovic against Denis Kudla of the United States. During his win Wednesday, Djokovic was visited several times by a trainer for treatment on his painful left shoulder. Whether or not he had any input — wink, wink — Djokovic surely must have been pleased to get such a late start, giving him a chance to rest that joint......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2019

RSF announces nominees for Press Freedom Awards 2019

MANILA, Philippines – International media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) announced on Friday, August 30, the nominees of its Press Freedom Awards 2019 ahead of the awards ceremony happening in Berlin on September 12. The shortlist for 3 international awards – Prize for Courage, Prize for Impact, and ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 30th, 2019

Arnell is never affected by bullying for being gay

Even if the SOGIE (Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression) Bill is as good as dead (Senate President Tito Sotto said, “Why so many labels when there should only be one, homo sapiens?”), Arnell Ignacio was game in giving his opinion when he recently met select members of the movie press at the B Hotel in connection with his new show Arnelli in The Haus (airing every Thursday night at 8:30 on IBC 13)......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 28th, 2019