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35 years after the Edsa euphoria

Euphoric. That was how my fellow seminarians and I felt when we heard the Radyo Veritas announcement that Marcos had fled Malacañang on Feb. 25, 1986. The following day, the Philippine Daily Inquirer immortalized our collective euphoria with its screaming headline: “It’s all over; Marcos flees!” My memory of the precise timeline of Edsa is […] The post 35 years after the Edsa euphoria appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerFeb 25th, 2021

Grace Poe, Cory Aquino, and the Failed EDSA Revolution

Thirty years ago, There was euphoria throughout the country, and indeed throughout the world. The Filipino people had kicked out a brutal tyrant and sent him and his entire family packing. And they did this without violence or loss of life. Ferdinand Marc.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philnewsRelated NewsJul 17th, 2016

EDSA 35 years hence

Thirty-five years have gone by since crowds of millions converged on EDSA to end more than two decades of Marcos rule in the country......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 1st, 2021

35 years since EDSA, groups warn against threats to democracy

Groups on Thursday urged Filipinos to resist threats to democracy and scored rights violations in the country as the Philippines marks 35 years since the removal of ousted dictator Ferdinand Marcos......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2021

Cebu and the days leading to February 25, 1986

CEBU CITY, Philippines – Filipinos may have different ways and beliefs in commemorating the EDSA People Power Revolution 35 years later. But the lessons from this pivotal moment in Philippine history remained true, and that it is still regarded as one of the world’s most notable peaceful demonstrations that took place in the 20th century. […] The post Cebu and the days leading to February 25, 1986 appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2021

How some of Cebu’s youth leaders see Edsa ‘People Power’ Revolution

Collective action to bring about change. A bloodless revolution.  Fight for freedom.  This is what the Edsa Revolution also known as the People Power Revolution means to some of the youth leaders of Cebu today, 35 years after the historic event happened. Read: Cebu and the days leading to February 25, 1986 For Rhea May […] The post How some of Cebu’s youth leaders see Edsa ‘People Power’ Revolution appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2021

A sustainable giga-buck project

There is no doubt that the government’s infrastructure program today is unprecedented in the country’s post-EDSA history. The projects that have been accomplished, including those that are underway, will surely shape how our country will fare in the years to come......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2021

Improved right-of-way acquisition key to timely Skyway 3 completion — Villar

Improved acquisition of road right-of-way was among the key reasons behind the recent completion of the Metro Manila Skyway Stage 3, Public Works and Highways Secretary Mark Villar said Saturday. Public Works and Highways Secretary Mark Villar (MARK VILLAR FACEBOOK / MANILA BULLETIN FILE PHOTO) In a statement, Villar commended the department’s task force responsible in speeding up the road right-of-way (RROW) acquisition for the elevated expressway that links the southern and northern parts of Metro Manila. “We are now on the final stage of the Skyway Stage 3 Project that will link the southern and northern portions of Metro Manila by connecting SLEX and NLEX before the end of 2020. This would not be possible if not for the commitment of our DPWH ROW Task Force who have worked relentlessly with concessionaire CITRA Central Expressway Corporation (CCEC) to speed up delivery of needed ROW,” Villar said.  Right-of-way acquisition, the secretary stressed, is the most common cause of project delay, especially under public-private partnership. This prompted the creation of a task force for each flagship program and decentralization of ROW operations under Department Order No. 65, series of 2017.  According to Villar, prior to the issuance of DO 65, “ROW acquisition for the Skyway Stage 3 was sluggish at 8.64 percent, even though it had been 35 months since it commenced in 2015.” The improved system, he said, allowed them to acquire 95 percent of ROW in two years and seven months. It is instrumental in facilitating the ROW acquisition, particularly on the issue of National Grid Corporation (NGCP) and Meralco on the removal and relocation of their respective facilities, the secretary said.  As of September 2020, 40 out of the scheduled 47 service utilities of NGCP had been completely removed/relocated, five ongoing, and two for expropriation.  Out of the 1,312 Meralco utilities affected, 1,090 were completely removed or relocated, 24 ongoing, and 198 not to be relocated anymore, while 95.0 percent site possession had been delivered.  “We recognize the need to speed-up ROW acquisition for the timely realization of our Build, Build, Build program and with our formed ROW task forces, the public can expect more big-ticket projects to be completed in the coming months and years,” Villar said.  He bared that a fifth segment had been introduced at the north end of the project from Balintawak Cloverleaf at Epifanio delos Santos Avenue (EDSA). This will connect to the North Luzon Expressway Footbridge to avoid traffic congestion along A. Bonifacio Street and EDSA......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 24th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 5

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 3 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 4 --- Pingoy Rule: Never lose hope. --- For the second time in two years, Jerie Pingoy had to have surgery done on his left foot. In November 2017, he injured his left foot in the final frame of the last game of the elimination round of the UAAP. In December 2017, the 5-foot-11 guard went to Pampanga to rid his left foot of bone spurs. Fast forward to June 2019 and his left foot was yet to be fully healed. A failed surgery as well as playing through pain worsened the bone spurs that had long been building up in Pingoy's left foot and he had no other choice but to go to famed sports doctor Raul Canlas. "Nung pinatingin namin kay Doc Canlas, sabi niya, bakit daw hindi inoperahan yung mismong may bone spurs," he shared in a phone interview. "Ako, wala naman akong kaalam-alam. Eh tapos na yun, wala na akong magagawa. Alangan namang habulin ko pa yung doktor dati." As the now-25-year-old was no longer with Adamson University, he had to pay for the new surgery out of his own pocket. Fortunately, he had his girlfriend not only to help him raise funds, but also to find a way to decrease the amount. "Yung girlfriend ko, nagwo-work sa Maxicare (a health maintenance organization) so yun, nag-apply kami ng health card. Buti naman, na-approve," he said. With that, Pingoy went under the knife for the second time in two years. And, as it turns out, it was an outpatient operation. "Ang kasama ko lang nun, girlfriend ko. Pasok kami Sunday, labas ng Monday kasi wala naman kaming ipon e. Binayad na namin lahat ng meron kami sa opera," he said. The good news is that at long last, his left foot is all well and good. As he put it, "At least, ngayon, okay na okay na." NOT ALONE That’s just one of the reasons why Pingoy believes he already has his life partner beside him. Talking about girlfriend Dixie Soberano, he said, full of love, "Through all the darkness na nangyari sa akin, she stayed with me. Alam niya kung gaano ka-struggle yung nangyari sa akin, pero nag-stay siya." He then continued, "Sobrang nagpapasalamat ako sa kanya kasi nandito siya, 'di niya ako iniwan. Siya pa nga laging nagpapaalala sa aking magpakundisyon ka, magpapayat ka para sa future natin." Not only that, Soberano was also how Pingoy received the biggest blessings in his life. In one-year-and-three-month-old Kaeden Jared and two-month-old Jaeden Keith, the Cebuano has even more will to go on and prove that his career is far from finished. "Sila yung nagbibigay ng inspirasyon sa akin. Ang practice namin sa CEU, alas sais ng umaga, pero gumigising ako ng alas kwatro kasi iniisip ko, para sa anak ko 'to, para sa kinabukasan nila 'to," he said. He leaves home motivated - and comes home even more motivated as he has a brand new dream to go alongside the one of him playing in the PBA. "Every time umuuwi ako, naiisip kong sana soon, yayaman ako at pag-uwi ko, sasabihan ko mga anak kong, 'Magbihis kayo, kakain tayo sa labas,'" he said. He then continued, "Tapos makikita ko kung gaano sila ka-excited. Talagang nagbago na buhay ko dahil sa kanila." NOT THE END Before COVID-19 shut down anything and everything, Pingoy looked like he was doing all in his power to put his career back on track. Just a month after Karate Kid-CEU took a chance on him, he proved diligent and disciplined in his extra work and trimmed down from 250 lbs. to just 197 lbs. Of course, having a life partner and two children, as well as his parents, relying on him is more than enough fuel to the fire. "Mahirap walang income eh. Nung isang taong nawala ako, as in walang income talaga eh kaya ngayon, kailangang magtulungan kami as a family," he said. Fortunately, the Scorpions have Pingoy's back as he claws and climbs the mountain once more. "Everybody deserves a second chance eh. Sakto kailangan ko rin ng point guard na leader para ma-guide yung mga bata namin," head coach Jeff Napa said. And there remains more than a few who have not lost faith. "If Koko can be given a chance and the confidence, he can still realize the potential that he has," Bo Perasol, the head coach who recruited and then mentored him in Ateneo de Manila University, said. In Napa, team manager Johnny Yap, and all of Karate Kid-CEU, Pingoy has another shot - as long as he keeps at it. "Maganda pa rin naman ang future ng batang yan basta mag-work hard lang siya nang todo at bumalik yung game shape niya. Yung talent at basketball sense kasi, meron na siya e," his new mentor said. FORGET-ME-NOT However, it is yet to be determined when the 2020 PBA D-League Aspirants Cup would resume action - or if it would even resume action. With COVID-19 posing more questions than answers, hope is all that Pingoy has for his career that has seen more starts and stops than rush hour traffic in EDSA. Still, hope is what he has been holding to all throughout - and is the reason he still stands even after having seen half of his collegiate career go to waste because of residency. Back-to-back MVP seasons in the UAAP Jrs. were followed by two years in a row of residency. A rookie year in Ateneo was followed by another season on the sidelines after transferring to Adamson. Two years as a Soaring Falcon were followed by a year out of the grid. Now, Jerie Pingoy, once thought to be special, just wants to have a shot at normal. This, even though what he has been through in his young life is already ripe for the pickings for a TV drama. "Sa lahat ng nangyari, parang gusto ko na ngang magpa-MMK e," he kidded. And who, if ever, would portray him on Maalala Mo Kaya? The answer to that is pretty clear in his eyes. "Si Gerald Anderson. Sakto pareho kaming Bisaya, pareho kaming gwapo." Without a doubt, after all that happened to him, the sense of humor is still there with Jerie Pingoy. Hopefully, the game that once made him a promising prospect is still there too. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 12th, 2020

Fil-Am activists show support for ABS-CBN amid shutdown threats

It’s been 34 years since the EDSA People Power Revolution ousted the Marcos dictatorship in the Philippines —and that spirit of activism still rings true today......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 8th, 2020

The untold story of the 1986 EDSA Revolution

First of a series If there is anything to learn from the so-called EDSA Revolution 34 years ago last Tuesday, it is that it has not only become a long avenue of questions, regrets and flawed political, social and economic policies but a source of continuing hatred, vengeance and disunity that continue to imperil the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 2nd, 2020

14 years to EDSA

The 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution was the culmination of a 14- year struggle to overthrow the Marcos dictatorship and restore democracy......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 27th, 2020

EDSA and the curse of CJ Corona

I’ve added 34 years in my life (I’m now 68 years old), this means that at the time of the EDSA Revolt, I was only 34 when we went to the streets in Fuente Osmeña because of that huge rally by the United Nationalist Democratic Organization, the only political party I ever joined thanks to my lawyer Atty. Raul M. Gonzales who was UNIDO secretary general back then......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2020

Reignite the spirit of EDSA Revolution, solon urges youth

Deputy Speaker and Basilan Representative Mujiv Hataman today called on the Filipino people to reignite the spirit of the 1986 EDSA Revolution and value the freedom gained 34 years ago, as he encouraged the “woke” generations of today to learn from the experience of those who fought hard and won against the dictatorship......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2020

Finally, a book on Summer Palace!

I have been going to EDSA Shangri-La, Manila’s Summer Palace for years. And I am so glad to know that the hotel released a coffee table book Summer Palace: Reinventing a Timeless Classic, a literary tribute to a culinary icon beloved by many......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 19th, 2019

When the Philippines showed its best as SEA Games hosts in 1981, 1991 and 2005

Hosting the biennial Southeast Asian Games, just like any international multi-sport competition, offers an opportunity for a country to flaunt its best—in terms of organizing the event, making the tournament stand-out, and unleash a vaunted athletic campaign against the region’s best. Before this year’s SEA Games, the Philippines has hosted the SEA Games three times—all of which were momentous and ground-breaking. And in each successive staging, the Filipinos went up the medal standings, reaching the top in the country’s most successful showing in international sports when the country last hosted the biennial event 14 years ago. 1981 This was the first time the Philippines took the cudgels in hosting the Games. Already in its 11th staging, the SEA Games became a centerpiece event of President Ferdinand Marcos’s presidency, as it highlighted his administration’s heightened focus on sports development. This was through the initiative of Marcos nephew Michael Keon’s Gintong Alay program.  The Games was known as the launching pad of Asia’s sprint queen Lydia de Vega, who marveled everyone with her speed and track prowess that earned her the Gold in record-breaking performances in the 100, 200, and women’s relay teams. Isidro del Prado was another track phenom, ruling the 400 meters also in record fashion. The Games was the breakthrough year in Philippine sports as it produced a bountiful harvest in Golds from track and field, cycling, bowling, boxing, basketball, swimming, and weightlifting, among others. The Philippines ended at third, its highest place at the time, with 55 golds, 55 silvers, and 77 bronze medals for a total 187 medals. 1991 Ten years after its impressive first-ever SEA Games hosting, a new government and political climate enveloped the biennial meet. Under President Corazon Aquino, the 16th SEA Games showed the remarkable change the country attained since the 1986 EDSA Revolution, which would be emphasized with an astonishing medal performance, almost topping the 16th edition if not for Indonesia’s marathon gold.  Swimming took the spotlight with ace tanker Eric Buhain capturing a record six golds, making him the most bemedalled athlete, and Akiko Thompson becoming the crowd darling, donning two golds. Bea Lucero also achieved a first-ever milestone of being the only athlete to win medals in two sporting events—two golds in gymnastics in 1987 Jakarta and a gold in the bantamweight division of women’s taekwondo in the 1991 Manila games. A 27 year-old Lydia de Vega-Mercado reclaimed the Asian sprint queen title by winning the Gold in the 100 meters over compatriot Elma Muros and Malaysian Goldivasamy Shanti. Muros, however, won the 100 meter hurdles and won the long jump gold for four successive stagings—a SEA Games first.  The Philippines would rule several sport events with a gold rush in swimming, boxing, basketball, shooting, wushu, track and field, taekwondo, bowling, billiards, among others. Its 91 Gold, 62 Silver, 84 Bronze, and 237 total medal count was good for second. 2005 It took fourteen years before Manila hosted the SEA Games again. And in 2005, its rise as the regional powerhouse in sports was completed with the contingent under the administration of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo reaching the top of the medal standings.  The 23rd  staging was unprecedented, starting with the Opening Ceremonies being held at the Quirino Grandstand instead of a sports stadium, drawing an immense live audience—estimated as the largest ever for a sports event at 200,000. It was the grandest, having the widest array of sports legends appearing in the grand parade of colors, such as SEA Games legends Lydia de Vega-Mercado and Akiko Thompson, Olympic silver medalist Onyok Velasco, top basketball player Allan Caidic, and champion equestrienne Mikee Cojuangco-Jaworski. When the Philippine delegates arrived, they were accompanied by Miss International 2005 Precious Lara Quigaman, actress Angel Locsin, and then World Boxing Council Lightweight Champion Manny Pacquiao.  Best of all, the Philippines erased the stigma of being the “sick man” of Asian sports, as it won golds left and right, even in sport events it was not usually dominant. Diver Sheila Mae Perez, swimmer Miguel Molina, rower Benjamin Tolentino Jr., and billiards ace Alex Pagulayan were the winningest Filipino athletes with three golds each. Wushu had the most golds with 11, followed by track and field, aquatics, boxing, billiards and snooker, taekwondo, traditional boat race, fencing, wrestling, bowling, judo, and archery. In addition, the Philippines won golds in arnis, karatedo, muay, rowing, shooting, lawn tennis, cycling, dance sports, golf, gymnastics, softball, baseball, lawn balls, equestrian, and pencak silat.  In total, the Philippines won the overall championship with an astonishing 113 gold, 84 silver, 94 bronze, and 291 total medal haul—its best ever in international competitions. Will the Philippines match or eclipse its historic achievement 14 years ago and continue its rise in the medal tally when it hosts the biennial event? Catch the 30th SEA Games in various locations in the Philippines from Saturday, November 30 until Wednesday, December 11 on ABS-CBN S+A, ABS-CBN S+A HD, Liga, Liga HD, iWant Sports, and sports.abs-cbn.com. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 30th, 2019

UAAP Season 82: We haven t achieved anything yet -- Ayo

It was okay for University of Sto. Tomas head coach Aldin Ayo to see his wards celebrate the big upset over University of the Philippines in the UAAP Season 82 men’s basketball stepladder semifinals Wednesday. In fact, who was he to stop the jubilation of the Tigers and the UST faithful in a sea of yellow inside the packed MOA Arena. He allowed them to enjoy the moment. When it subsided, he reminded them that the semis battle may be won but the war is far from over.     “Wala pa kaming naa-achieve. We haven't achieved anything yet,” said Ayo after the Tigers ousted the twice-to-beat Fighting Maroons, 68-65, to advance to the Finals. The Espana-based squad will have a few days to prepare to face a gargantuan task of toppling grand slam-seeking and unbeaten Ateneo de Manila University.   “That's why I told the players after the game, well, they were celebrating and right now sabi ko kay Renzo... Renzo was apologizing because nagce-celebrate, sabi ko sa kanya okay lang, let it all out, tao lang naman eh,” said Ayo, who is in his fourth collegiate championship stint after steering Letran to the NCAA throne four years ago, De La Salle University to a crown in 2016 and another Finals stint the following year. But he was quick to snap his boys out of their euphoria to see that yet to be done task at hand. “Pero I told them to refocus because hindi pa tapos eh. Hindi pa tapos,” said the mentor. Ayo quite frankly didn’t want his No. 4 seed team to be contented with what they had achieved so far. “Nakita ko lang yung celebration. Ako medyo nag-worry ako ng konti kasi ayaw ko makita ng ganung celebration na mukhang silang nakukunteto eh,” he said. “And some of the coaching staff were crying, even my wife was crying, but I told her. Sabi ko, ‘Mommy wala pa tayo naa-achieve eh.’ “So we have to refocus and prepare for our next game,” Ayo said Game 1 of the Finals is on Saturday.     ---    Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 13th, 2019

Unforgettable UAAP Final Four Moments

A Final Four in any of the UAAP seasons in the last 26 years has always been memorable and epic. Since Season 56, the format has intensified the competitiveness in the league, as it has since given four teams the chance at a championship, instead of just two teams in the 55 seasons prior. Here we witnessed dramatic, climactic face-offs between the first and fourth placers, and the second and third placers, with the top two teams enjoying a twice-to-beat advantage. This is to determine who will slug it out in the Finals. Yet there are rare instances when a school tops the eliminations unscathed, just like this year’s mighty Ateneo Blue Eagles, who advanced to the Finals outright after sweeping the round. In this case, a stepladder Final Four is implemented wherein the third and fourth battle each other in a do-or-die match before facing the second placer, which has a twice-to-beat advantage. And yes, these teams have made their playoff wars exciting and spectacular with a level of play that is truly exceptional. Here are some of the most powerful, controversial, heroic, and reverberating moments in the UAAP Final Four that have been forever etched in our minds:   1) UP enters Finals for first time in 32 years in Season 81 In their first Final Four appearance in 21 years, the UP Fighting Maroons had the utmost desire to make history once more with the battlecry “Atin ‘To,” captain Paul Desiderio’s famous call to arms.  And, in Season 81, barreling into the semifinals was already a gigantic feat, having been in the cellar for quite a while in the UAAP.  But they wanted more, and facing a championship-ready Adamson Soaring Falcons was an immense challenge with its lean and mean arsenal, given how the San Marcelino cagers had waylaid the competition in the eliminations, including the defending champions Ateneo. But they were unfazed with Adamson’s twice-to-beat advantage, and in Game 1, they would beat the odds, as the Fighting Maroons and the Soaring Falcons ended up tied at 71-all with three seconds to go. As Juan Gomez de Liano was inbounding, he found an open Bright Akhuetie near the basket to convert the game-winner for UP to arrange a winner-take-all.  And in the decider, it was again a tedious trek for both teams, with the game tied for the last time at 87-all in overtime. Then, the fiery captain will again own it for the Fighting Maroons as he swooshed a jumper off Adamson’s Sean Maganti with 6.6 seconds left. With Falcon guard Jeron Lastimosa missing a three off a timeout as time ran out led to utter euphoria in the Maroon-dominated Araneta Coliseum, spilling out to the numerous UP campuses across the nation, as the Fighting Maroons entered the Finals for the first time in 32 years. They would be denied a repeat of their 1986 title run however by the back-to-back champions Ateneo Blue Eagles, which won the Finals convincingly.   2) Blue Eagle Gec Chia’s miracle “shot” in Season 65 Season 65 was certainly the most unforgettable for the Ateneo Blue Eagles as it achieved a flurry of milestones. Already with a well-developed line-up and the immense motivation to win it all, after their previous heartbreaking campaigns, the Eagles had beaten the league-leading and four-peat-hunting DLSU Green Archers in the last game of the eliminations, denying them a sweep and an outright finals berth. And in third place at the end of the elims, the Eagles would face another formidable squad, the James Yap and Paul Artadi-enforced second-placers UE Red Warriors. After staging a stunning upset in the first game of their Final Four match-up, 84-78, Ateneo again engaged UE in a close, hard fought decider and both teams were tied at 70-all with 7.8 seconds left.  With LA Tenorio trapped in the offensive play, he would kick the ball out to the gutsy marksman Gec Chia, who would rise to the occasion and soar over a phalanx of defenders to make that miracle “Shot” heard everywhere as time expired. That unforgettable shot pushed the Eagles into that climactic end to a 14-year title drought in the Finals by that Herculean drubbing of La Salle.   3) FEU’s Mac Belo buries last-second corner three against La Salle in Season 77 On October 1, 2014, the defending champions DLSU Green Archers threatened the second placers FEU Tamaraws, with a menacing win in their first match in the Final Four of Season 77, nearing to book another trip to the Finals. In Game Two, with 24 ticks remaining, the Tamaraws used up the remaining seconds with the intent of taking the last shot.  FEU point guard Mike Tolomia then barreled his way through the paint, drawing two La Salle defenders and leaving Mac Belo free at the corner. With a little over two seconds to go, Tolomia would hand the ball off to Belo for a catch-and-shoot beyond the arc at the right corner and buried the three as time expired, giving the Tamaraws a return trip to the Finals. They would, however, eventually lose to a gritty NU Bulldogs, which won their first title in 60 years.   4) FEU eliminates Ateneo with Mac Belo’s follow up buzzer beater in Season 78 In Season 78, the FEU Tamaraws would most certainly want another crack at the title, after losing to NU the previous year. And they were really scorching hot in the eliminations, ending up tied with the UST Growling Tigers at the top of the heap, but dropped to second place due to a lower quotient. In the Final Four, they would face the third placers Ateneo Blue Eagles with a twice-to-beat advantage. On November 21, 2015, the FEU and Ateneo were stuck in a really close game with Roger Pogoy waxing hot for the Tams, and Kiefer Ravena leading all departments for the Eagles. With ten seconds to go, Adrian Wong of Ateneo streaked for a layup after a Richard Escoto miss. Wong’s daredevil shot was deflected and the ball ended up in the hands of Mike Tolomia, who rushed back to the FEU side of the court for the final shot. He would make a gallant incursion with a near acrobatic layup with one second to go. And as the ball rimmed out, a well-positioned Mac Belo was below the basket for the quick, buzzer beating putback that once more sent the Tamaraws to the Finals. FEU would then claim their 20th title overall over the UST Growling Tigers in the Finals.   5) FEU's Miko Roldan hits game-winner against Ateneo in Season 63  Mac Belo breaking the hearts of Ateneans with that buzzer beater in Season 78 was like history repeating itself. Fifteen years earlier, the Tamaraws, led by Celino Cruz and Edwin Bacani, also engaged the Blue Eagles to a Final Four battle, with Ateneo having that twice-to-beat privilege.  Led by Rich Alvarez, LA Tenorio and Larry Fonacier, the Blue Eagles were really soaring to get that elusive title it last won in 1988. And in the first game in the Final Four, people were expecting the Blue Eagles to cruise past FEU, having beaten them twice in the elims.  But the Tamaraws really gave them a hell of a match. As Andrew Cruz flubbed two charities in the dying seconds that should have given the Blue Eagles a comfortable three-point lead, FEU gunner Miko Roldan sank a semi-hook shot at the buzzer in the ensuing play to break the hearts of Ateneans everywhere and extend the series, 61-60. In the decider, Cruz and Bacani would conspire for 39 points to complete a monster upset, 75-67, and reach the Finals. The defending champions DLSU Green Archers, led by the legendary Renren Ritualo, was just too much for the Tams in the Finals and copped their three-peat.   6) Fight-marred Ateneo-La Salle Final Four series in Season 66 Joseph Yeo was all over the court in a scoring binge while Rookie-of-the-Year JVee Casio showed a glimpse of being a clutch player as the DLSU Green Archers, the fourth seed, took their storied rivalry with defending champions Ateneo Blue Eagles, the top seed, to a tenacious, heated Final Four war. Heightened emotions were at play since Ateneo’s colossal Finals victory the previous season, and the animosity between the two ballclubs was at its fiercest and most intense. In Game 1, after La Salle’s Jerwin Gaco’s putback sent the game into overtime, the extended play’s physicality went to overdrive. With 1:31 left in overtime, Gaco bumped LA Tenorio in the battle for the loose ball. Tenorio would then sneak a punch at Gaco, who then nudged the Ateneo guard. This led to a bench-clearing brawl, as players punched, kicked and shoved each other while the coaches tried to break up the fight even as referees whistled repeatedly.  La Salle’s Ryan Arana kicked Ateneo’s Wesley Gonzales from behind and the league meted the Archer with a one-game suspension. Also suspended were Tenorio and fellow Blue Eagle Christian "Badjie" del Rosario. The Archers would prevail after the five-minute extension, 76-72. The decider was also as heated with on-court and off-court flare-ups and violent confrontations between players and supporters. Ateneo’s steady offense, however, prevailed in the final minute, as the Blue Eagles hung on to 74-68 victory, entering the Finals for the second straight year. FEU, however, would deny Ateneo a back-to-back run, winning the championship in two games.   7) UST trounces NU twice to become first fourth placer to eliminate the top-seed in a Final Four series in Season 76 The NU Bulldogs were on a roll, and 2013 seemed to be their year, with Bobby Ray Parks returning after back-to-back MVP seasons and leading them to reach the top of the standings at the end of eliminations. But they have their Achilles heel—the dribblers of Espana—who have exerted their mastery of the Bulldogs, winning twice in the elims. And bad news for the Bulldogs, they would meet the UST Growling Tigers, which ended at fourth place, in the Final Four.  In Game 1, a red-hot Kevin Ferrer would lead UST to its biggest margin of 18 within the match, but they needed to fend off NU’s late charge, 71-62, to force a rubber match. And in the winner-take-all, UST completed its mastery of top-ranked Bulldogs, again with a game-long dominance to end at 76-69, marking the first time a fourth seed would snatch a Finals berth from a first-placer in the league.   8) NU’s Alfred Aroga’s monster block on Ateneo’s Kiefer Ravena in Season 77 After a frustrating loss to UST in the Season 76 Final Four, NU would get another crack at gaining that elusive Finals appearance. But in the next chapter of the semifinals, NU will hope for a Cinderella finish to gain that berth, trying to beat the top placers Ateneo Blue Eagles, just like what UST did to them in the previous year when they were the top-seed. Jay-Jay Alejandrino and Troy Rosario led NU’s surge in the fourth quarter of the first game to spoil Ateneo’s twice to beat to force a deciding game. In the rubber match, no clear advantage was evident in the majority of the game. But after NU’s Gelo Alolino broke a 63-all tie with two charities off a foul from Ateneo’s Nico Elorde, 65-63, Kiefer Ravena would try to send the game to overtime with a drive against several NU defenders with three seconds left.  He failed however after NU’s Alfred Aroga swatted his attempt as time expired—a monster block that brought NU to its first finals appearance in 44 years. The Bulldogs would then wallop the FEU Tamaraws in the Finals, 2-1, to clinch their first title in 60 years. 9) Coming out party of UE’s Paul Lee in Season 72 The UE Red Warriors had come off from a heartbreaking Finals loss to the DLSU Green Archers in Season 70 after sweeping the eliminations, and another hurtful exit the succeeding year with a Final Four defeat at the hands of the Ateneo Blue Eagles. The Red Warriors would then make another trip to the Final Four in Season 72, which was the coming out party of prolific scorer Paul Lee, as the league’s third best after the eliminations. UE would battle second placers FEU for the chance to enter the Finals once more after the Season 70 debacle. They extended the series after Lee led a late game spurt with three consecutive three-pointers in a devastating 18-5 run, he would end up with a game-high 26 points. In the rubber match, with UE trailing FEU in the first half, the Red Warriors would make an explosive comeback in the second half and would again rely on the dependable Lee and Pari Llagas for their late-game heroics. Llagas would lift UE up for good with two straight field goals, 72-70, while Lee showed nerves of steel as he sank four consecutive free throws at the end of the game, 78-72, to give UE their Finals ticket. UE, however, would bow to powerhouse Ateneo Blue Eagles in the Finals in three games.   10) UST’s Jojo Duncil completes winning three-point play that frustrated UE in Season 69 By this time, the UE Red Warriors were in their fifth straight Final Four appearance. And in Season 69, UE would land at second place after the eliminations behind Ateneo, relishing its twice-to-beat advantage.  In the Final Four, UE would face a determined UST Growling Tigers, who were seeking redemption after last winning the championship in 1996, the last year of their 90s four-peat dynasty. UST would eke out a hard-earned Game 1 victory, 79-75 victory over UE that led to a deciding Game 2. In this clincher, both UST and UE kept the match close.  And in the final quarter, with the score tied at 79-all in the dying seconds, Growling Tiger Jojo Duncil converted on a tip-in, and-1, after a previous miss and teammate Jervy Cruz’s failed putback. Duncil would then complete the three-point play to give the UST an 82-79 edge, a few seconds left. UE’s Marcy Arellano would drive unmolested for an easy two to cut the lead to a solitary point, 82-81, nearing the end of the game. After UST committed a turnover, the Red Warriors had the chance to drop the game-winner but UE’s Jorel Cañizares missed a medium-range jump shot and a follow-up. Teammate Robert Labagala would then grab the rebound, but time ran out on the Recto dribblers. UST entered the Finals and annexed its first UAAP title in 10 years over the Ateneo Blue Eagles. Will there be another unforgettable Final Four moment in this current Season 82? Catch the start of the stepladder Final Four hostilities with the do-or-die match between the UST Growling Tigers and the FEU Tamaraws on Wednesday, November 6, for the right to meet the twice-to-beat second placers UP Fighting Maroons on Sunday, November 10......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 4th, 2019

The real challenge: How to solve Metro Manila’s worsening traffic

Over the past two years since I took on the job as Philippine Ambassador to the United States, I have noticed a substantial increase in the amount of time it takes to travel from one destination to another, particularly when one needs to pass through EDSA......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 20th, 2019

EDITORIAL - Beyond emergency powers

After three years, it looks like senators remain lukewarm to proposals to give President Duterte emergency powers to untangle the traffic mess particularly on EDSA......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 16th, 2019

3 years later, Senate faces same problem

  THREE years ago, at the start of the Duterte administration, Sen. Grace Poe led a Senate hearing on the traffic problem in Metro Manila, especially along Epifanio de los Santos Ave. (EDSA), focusing on a proposal for emergency powers to enable the Department of Transportation to solve the problem. Last Tuesday, Senator Poe was […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsAug 16th, 2019