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AJ Raval is confident to bare her talent

Young actress and sexy star AJ Raval is not totally unknown to the public when she eventually decided to tread the same path her dad, action star Jeric Raval (Ricardo Buensuceso), has taken. Elizabeth Buensuceso in real life, AJ is determined to carve her own niche in showbiz, make a name for herself and pursue her dream......»»

Category: entertainmentSource: philstar philstarJul 31st, 2021

Dating dyowa ni AJ Raval naadik sa sugal: Nagkautang-utang siya at ako ang nagbayad!

Sean de Guzman at AJ Raval DAHIL sa pagkalulong sa sugal, nagkautang-utang ang dating boyfriend ng sexy actress at Viva Artist Agency talent na si AJ Raval. Naikuwento ng dalaga ang tungkol dito sa nakaraang virtual mediacon ng bago niyang movie na “Taya” kung saan natanong nga siya at ang mga co-stars niya kung naranasan […] The post Dating dyowa ni AJ Raval naadik sa sugal: Nagkautang-utang siya at ako ang nagbayad! appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2021

Get dandruff-free hair with Selsun Blue

As we feel the heat these days, don’t let your hair suffer, too! With Selsun Blue, our summer will be comfortable and fresher! Don’t let your dandruff affect your glow this summer season and boost your self-esteem to the fullest. Feel more confident with zero dandruff falls on your shirt or bare shoulders with every […] The post Get dandruff-free hair with Selsun Blue appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 6th, 2021

Internet celebrity Benedict Cua shares & lsquo;Something Beautiful& rsquo;

Actor and Youtube vlogger Benedict Cua admitted that he wasn’t that confident when it comes to his singing, but he’s determined to hone this talent with the guidance of the people who believed that he’s got something beautiful to share with his fans......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 4th, 2021

Selsun Blue lets you flip your hair with confidence

Don’t we all have that uncomfortable encounter with dandruff ruining our special day? Are you feeling less confident because dandruff falls on your shirt or bare shoulders? Dandruff can really affect your self-esteem and how you interact with others. But here’s some good news: Dandruff is preventable and controllable. If you have a dandruff problem, […] The post Selsun Blue lets you flip your hair with confidence appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 24th, 2021

Samar student uses leaves to create portraits

TACLOBAN City – Instead of using paper or canvas, a second-year education student has been using leaves in making portraits during the lockdown caused by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Jhonil Bajado) Ryan Rio-Legatub Managaysay, a second year Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education – Social Studies student at the Samar State University from Tarangnan, Samar, uses “salikupkop” (Algoamorpha quercifolia) leaves, a medicinal fern, and also known as basket fern. His professor Jhonil Bajado discovered Ryan’s talent and posted it on social media. He said he already knew that Ryan had a knack for creating using visual arts as he had done some artworks for their school activities before.  “His first leaf art was a portrait of mine. He was not confident to show it to me at first, because he did not consider it worthy (of) my attention, he said. In fact, I saw it in his ‘My Day’ post first, before he sent it to me via Messenger upon my request. Knowing how unassuming this kid is, I know he was just hesitant to show the artistic work of his hand,” Bajado shared. Bajado describes his student as a timid 21-year-old, who came from a humble family. His commissioned artworks have allowed him to help augment their family’s income.  Bajado said he asked Ryan to do artworks of people, who influenced him as a person, and as a student, or other personalities he wished to bring to life through his leaf artworks.  “I was dumbfounded with what he sent me. He was able to do 2 to 3 artworks per day…I cannot help but be overjoyed with his God-given talent and share it with the world,” he added. His artworks have included portraits of Pope Francis, President Rodrigo Duterte, Senator Manny Pacquiao, Mayor Isko Moreno, Boy Abunda, Samar 2nd Dist. Rep. Sharrie Ann Tan, among others. “These artworks are, to me, a symbolic representation of the Bisayan resilience and the Filipino artistry, who are always able to find good vibes despite life’s adversity,” Bajado said. Bajado aims to share Ryan’s artworks to help the local artist grow and realize his full potential......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

Always About the People

“Solid!” That was the only reaction, or lack thereof, that I could muster after that first breakaway slam of Kiefer Ravena’s UAAP collegiate basketball career over the outstretched arms of UST’s foreign center, Karim Abdul. Moments before, you could see Kiefer was going to go hard, as it was a one-on-one breakaway and he had the speed advantage over Abdul, who was hot on his heels. Little did I know that he was going to go for that highlight that would announce his entry into college basketball. That reaction, that loss for words, can pretty much sum up my past 10 years of covering college basketball for ABS-CBN Sports.  They first asked me to write about my most memorable UAAP game coverage; but I must confess, I was never really good at remembering exact details of games, unlike some of my fellow sportscasters, or even coaches I know, who remember almost detail for detail, or play by play. My memories come in highlights, or sometimes even just flashes of good or memorable plays.  I remember a 6’8”, 18-year old Ben Mbala, whom we first saw a glimpse of while Anton Roxas and I were covering the CESAFI league in the hot and humid Cebu Coliseum, sometime around 2012. He was playing for the Southwestern University Cobras, wasn’t as built and polished as when he was with DLSU, but you could already see the raw talent and athleticism. Fast forward a few years, I remember well how he took the UAAP by storm, with his monster dunks, and how he piloted La Salle to a championship while winning league MVP in Season 79.  I remember the heralded rookie season of Kiefer Ravena in the men’s division, after a storied juniors career. Kiefer won Rookie of the Year honors and helped lead Ateneo to two more titles to round up their 5-peat, before it was Jeron Teng’s turn to lead the Green Archers to a championship over his elder brother Jeric and the UST Growling Tigers.  I remember Bobby Ray Parks Jr. and his back-to-back MVP seasons. He was arguably the most complete college player during that time. It was painful to see his team fall short especially during his second MVP year. The Bulldogs made history the year after though, with Alfred Aroga, Troy Rosario, and Gelo Alolino now at the helm, winning the school’s first ever championship after more than forty years. I would argue that the past decade saw some of the brightest UAAP college basketball stars, both local and foreign, take to the hard court. It would almost be unfair to start naming them because I’ll surely end up leaving some names worthy enough to be mentioned. But we all remember Greg Slaughter, Ryan Buenafe, RR Garcia, Terence Romeo, Mac Belo, RR Pogoy, Roi Sumang, Charles Mamie, Alex Nuyles, Jericho Cruz, Papi Sarr, Jeron Teng, Jason Perkins, Aljun Melecio, Kiefer and Thirdy, Bobby Ray, Alfred Aroga, Kevin Ferrer, Karim Abul, Jeric Teng, Ange Kuoame, Matt and Mike Nieto, Paul Desiderio, Juan GDL, and the list goes on and on… all of them making their mark in the UAAP the past ten years. Aside from the highlights, there were the more mundane, behind-the-scenes memories, especially covering out-of-town games when we used to do the CESAFI and the PCCL. That was basketball coverage at its purest. There was a time we traveled to Lanao Del Sur to cover the Mindanao regional selection of the PCCL. Lanao was about another two to three hour drive from Cagayan de Oro along a dark highway with trees and mountains all around; and where there was only one mall in the entire town. Or when we traveled by van to La Union to cover the north regional selection of the PCCL… or even staying a whole week at the Cebu Grand Hotel, for the VisMin regional selection. Coverages then were bare bones: no real-time stats or live graphics, and I would even sometimes have to tally the points and rebounds of each player in-game on my notebook just so that I’d have some semblance of stats to mention on the coverage. Still, those games were so much fun because the players, getting their first shot at national TV coverage, would leave everything out on the floor.  In a year or so, both the UAAP and the NCAA will announce their respective new homes, and new broadcast teams will have the privilege of covering the best collegiate basketball players in the country. That’s how the ball bounces. I’m a firm believer that in life there are seasons, and a perfect time for everything. I’m just thankful for the opportunities thrown my way. If you were to ask me why the coverage of the UAAP helped build the league into what it is today, my answer would be simple: it was always about the people. At the end of the day, what makes the UAAP and its coverage great are the stories of the people that play, coach, officiate, cover, and run the games. It’s not really about the championships or the awards, but rather the challenges, hardships, and journeys of each of the individuals that brought them there.  And it is also about the directors, producers, cameramen, reporters and make-up artists that make sure that the audience sees what is supposed to be seen – the winning basket, a fan’s priceless reaction, the agony in defeat, and the glory of victory. It’s what Boom Gonzalez or Mico Halili would always say, that our job as anchors and analysts is to tell the people watching at home the story of what is happening in the game in the best way possible.  I just want to tip my hat to all the people that allowed us to do our jobs the best way possible. From our directors, producers, cameramen, floor directors, fellow panelists, courtside reporters, league officials, statisticians, make-up artists, and all those people behind the scenes whom we worked with, know that we were able to give our best because of you; and the UAAP coverage will not be what it is if not for all of your hard work and dedication.  It was, is, and will always be about the people. Marco Benitez was the team captain for the Ateneo Blue Eagles when they won the UAAP Season 65 men's seniors basketball title in 2002. Marco eventually covered collegiate basketball as analyst for ABS-CBN Sports starting in 2010. He is presently the President of the Philippine Women's University (PWU)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

FIBA: Mighty Jimmy and the shot that introduced Gilas to the World

This story was originally published on Feb. 24, 2019 It’s Saturday night at Mall of Asia and the arena is absolutely rocking. Eternal basketball rivals in the Philippines and South Korea are delivering another classic. Gilas Pilipinas is down to the final minute of regulation against its longtime tormentor in the second of two semifinal games. The national team is up by two, 81-79. The Philippines is hosting the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships where three tickets to the 2014 World Cup are at stake and the winner of this particular game gets one of those tickets. Given the rich history of both teams and what it would mean to the winner, this pivotal game has gone down the wire as everyone pretty much expected. Also knowing the history of both teams in international play, Gilas’ precarious two-point lead was not safe at all. A ghost was lurking in the background and a dreaded curse felt almost inevitable. Down to the final minute of the crucial grudge match between the Philippines and South Korea, guard Jimmy Alapag has the ball and a two-point lead. What he will do will help define not only his career but the legacy of the Gilas name as a national team.   WAKE-UP CALL Even before the Philippines-Korea game, Gilas Pilipinas already had to go through one emotional game early in its homestand for the Asian Championships. In a preliminary round showdown against Chinese Taipei, the Filipinos collapsed in the fourth quarter, allowing the Taiwanese to steal a morale-boosting 84-79 win. In 2013, the relationship between the two countries hit a rough patch over the death of one Taiwanese fisherman. In an updated May 17 report by CNN’s Jethro Mullen, “Taiwan has reacted angrily after one of its fishermen was killed by a Philippine coast guard vessel.” Taiwan had frozen applications from OFWs seeking jobs in its territory and the government of then President Ma Ying-jeou demanded an apology, among other things, from the Philippines. While the national basketball teams of both countries never really had any prior animosity with each other, tension was naturally present as both teams squared off in Group A action. Gilas Pilipinas and Chinese-Taipei both entered the showdown with identical 2-0 records and the winner would take control of solo Group A lead heading into round 2. Taking a good lead into the fourth quarter, the Philippines was outscored by 18 in the last 10 minutes and the national team took its worst home loss in quite some time. “At the time, it was a huge game for us. We understood what was happening in Taipei during that particular time. We really wanted to win for what our kababayans were going through at that time,” guard Jimmy Alapag said on that first home loss in the 2013 Asian Championships. “We didn’t get the job done, and it was tough especially to lose a game like that, it was a very emotional and it was a game that we knew we needed,” he added. The crushing loss meant that the Philippines had little room for error in round 2. While Gilas didn’t have any world beaters lined up in the second round, anything less than a perfect run would have meant an early clash with Asia’s established powerhouse teams in the knockout stages. On the other side of the bracket, defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea were battling for position and were expected to finish in the top-3. That means if Gilas Pilipinas failed to finish no. 1 in its group, the national team would have faced one of those teams in the quarterfinals. Gilas picked up a crucial win over Qatar in the 6th of August and the day after, the Philippines got some help from those same Qataris as they beat Taipei in a close decision. At the end of round 2, all teams finished with identical win-loss records but Gilas Pilipinas would take over first place after all tiebreaks were considered, barely edging out Taipei. The Philippines ended up avoiding defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea and instead got Kazakhstan in the quarterfinals. No. 2 Taipei drew China and the third-running Qataris were matched up with the South Koreans. “I think that was the moment we grew up and grew closer. I think that was the lowest of the lows, just because of the atmosphere and what was going on between both countries. It kind of felt that we let our end of the bargain down, you know what I mean? We’re on our home soil and we didn’t take care of business. I think that was one of those moments where we had to really check ourselves and find a way to make it right,” forward Gabe Norwood said of the Taipei loss. “But it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. In tournaments like FIBA-Asia it’s important that you have short-term memory whether it was a win or a loss. We needed to let go of that game and continue to stay the course, keep our focus in the tournament,” Alapag added. On August 7, four days after Gilas lost to Taipei, the rift between the Philippines and Taiwan would reach a resolution and the latter country lifted its freeze hiring and other sanctions on the former. The Philippines also did issue on official apology over the death of the Taiwanese fisherman a couple of months prior and the National Bureau of Investigation in Manila recommended the pressing of homicide charges to erring members of the Philippine Coast Guard.   DARK HISTORY If the word “rival” is to be defined as a, “person or group that tries to defeat or be more successful than another person or group” then sure, the Philippines and South Korea are rivals. Both countries are rivals in the Asian basketball scene and they have been going at it for a very long time. But if the word rival can also mean “equal” or “peer,” is the Philippines really a worthy basketball rival to South Korea? The Philippines’ history with South Korea in terms of basketball is dark. Very dark. Consider the most high-profile matches between the two countries and you’ll see that the Philippine national team is just not at the level of South Korea. Or at the very least, Koreans always seem to reach 120 percent of their potential when they play Filipinos and we barely bring out 80 percent of our abilities when matched up against our East Asian neighbors. The 1998 PBA Centennial team, arguably the greatest Philippine team ever assembled, was demolished by South Korea in the Asian Games. A national team set up for gold only settled for bronze. Speaking of a bronze medal game, the original Gilas Pilipinas team lost a podium finish to South Korea in the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships. That team squandered a double-digit lead and collapsed late. Of course, who can forget the semifinals of the 2002 Asian Games in Busan when Olsen Racela had the chance to put the Philippines up four but missed two free throws. South Korea would win with a booming triple at the buzzer off a broken play and would later take down China to capture the gold medal. South Korea is the Philippines’ basketball nemesis for all intents and purposes. A worthy adversary that always seem to emerge victorious at our expense. Still, all that previous disappointment didn’t seem to bother Gilas Pilipinas six years ago. The team was not scared and instead, they were excited even. One factor to greatly consider was that fact that the game was in Manila. It makes all the difference to play at home. “We understood the bad history that we had with Korea. We haven’t been very successful with them in quite some time but we knew from Day 1 that if ever we got an opportunity to play them at home, then we have a great chance,” Alapag said. “Man, pre-game, it was just the focus. Everybody was up for the challenge, I don’t think anybody was really nervous, I think it was just the anxiety... we wanted to get out there and do it already,” Norwood added. Playing at home had its perks for sure, but it also had its drawbacks. For all the painful losses the Philippines suffered at the hands of South Korea, it would have been devastating if Gilas actually took a beating in Manila. Stakes were extra high in this particular chapter of this long, ongoing saga. “There was always pressure, it was something that we acknowledged early. Playing at home, it’s great having that support but at the same time, there is some added pressure because you wanna make sure that you make our home crowd proud of the team that they watch and ultimately, win games,” Alapag said, making sure to note that the national team knew of the disadvantages of playing at home even before the Korea game. “It was there but it was something that we acknowledged and we wanted to make sure that we took advantage of the opportunity playing at home,” he added.   ALL FILIPINO, ALL HEART Once it was go time, the Philippines-South Korea game went about pretty normal, as you would expect any game from these two national teams. But even before halftime, an injury to Gilas center Marcus Douthit changed the complexion of the semifinals showdown. All of a sudden, the Philippines was without its anchor, without its best player. Sure, there were players on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace Douthit’s size but there was simply no one on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace his talent, production, and just overall presence. June Mar Fajardo was in that Gilas bench but it 2013, the would-be five-time PBA Most Valuable Player was just not at that level yet. It would have been easy for Gilas Pilipinas to fold like cheap furniture and succumb to the overwhelming pressure of trying to overcome South Korea to reach a stage very few Filipinos have reached before. Gilas didn’t fold and instead, the Douthit injury rallied the team even further. “Alam mo sa totoo lang, puso na lang yun eh. Nung nawala si Marcus talaga, sabi ni coach kailangan doble kayod tayo. Dahil sobrang dehado tayo kumbaga, wala na tayong import, wala tayong malaki,” forward Marc Pingris said. With Douthit gone, Ping ate up all of his minutes and worked by committee with guys like Ranidel De Ocampo and Japeth Aguilar to fill in the gaps. “As a player naman, kami nagusap-usap kami na kahit anong mangyari, lalaban kami. Yung time na yun, talagang patay kung patay,” Ping added. Despite losing its best player to an untimely injury, Gilas Pilipinas’ confidence in winning never wavered. With their collective backs against the wall, the Philippine national team played even better. Unlike the later iterations of Gilas Pilipinas, the 2013 team, aptly called Gilas 2.0, had the luxury of having actual preparation before the FIBA-Asia Championships. The amount of work that came before the tournament and the Korea game, the bond built over countless hours of training, all of that helped the national team avoid a monumental meltdown in front of a rabid Manila crowd. “We were such a close-knit team in terms of our chemistry, in terms of the talent that we had, so we felt confident even when Marcus went down early in the game. If you looked at our huddle, you had 11 more very confident guys, not just in themselves but more importantly, in each other,” Alapag said. “That just boiled down to the chemistry that we had. I don’t think any of us panicked, we were all confident in each other. We’ve all been into that situation with our PBA teams, having the ball in our hands and making a play. Knowing that we had five weapons on the floor that could make the winning play, I think it made us very confident and we were able to sustain our composure,” the former Gilas captain added.   THE GHOST AND ITS CURSE Shin Dong Pa, Hur Jae, Lee Sang-min, Oh Se-Keun, TJ Moon, and Cho Sung-min are just some players from the South Korean national team that inflicted incredible damage to the Philippines over the course of decades. The dreaded Ghost of South Korea takes form in these players and its curse is to give Filipinos the most heart-crushing loss possible. In 2013, the Ghost was Kim Min-goo and his curse was to beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Despite losing Marcus Douthit and trailing by three points at the break, the Philippines started to turn the tables in the second half. Gilas Pilipinas unleashed Jayson Castro and the Blur led a blazing offense in the third quarter, finding a way to take a 10-point lead over South Korea, the Philippines’ largest of the night. But as the dust settled and Gilas holding a 65-56 lead entering the final period, an ominous figure would make his presence felt. The Korean Ghost has arrived and his name was Kim Min-goo. His curse? Beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Kim was 22 and a senior in college when he made the South Korean national basketball team as a backup shooter in 2013. In nine games in Manila, Kim would play well enough to make the tournament’s All-Star team, averaging 12.7 points, 4.1 rebounds, and 2.7 assists. He led Asian Championships with 25 three-point field goals, 10 came in the last two games and five came against Gilas Pilipinas. Kim drilled back-to-back triples to open the fourth quarter against the Philippines. Later, his fifth triple — a four-point play at that — pushed the Koreans to within a point, 72-73. South Korea would take over soon after as Lee Seung-jun dunked the basketball on a fastbreak. The Ghost has arrived and his curse is in effect. “Ako pumasok sa isip ko yun nung lumamang Korea, na putek ito na naman,” Pingris said. “Pero ang sabi ko, sayang yung opportunity, kaya naman eh. So sabi ni Jimmy samin, no matter what happens wag kami gi-give up. Pinaghirapan natin to at may goal tayo, this year aalis tayo,” he added, noting the team’s goal to get into Spain and compete with the world’s best national teams. Faced with the possibility of dealing with a devastating defeat, Gilas had enough mental fortitude to keep things going. Trust your system, trust your preparation, trust your crowd, trust your teammates, and more importantly, trust yourselves. “You’re never out of the game if you’re playing at home,” Norwood said as they stared a deficit late against their destined rivals. “I think that was our mindset, keep it close and just find a way,” he added. Jimmy Alapag found a way.   BORN READY Down 73-75, Jimmy Alapag was under heavy duress when he let go of a three-pointer from the left wing just in front of his bench. It was good to go. The Philippines was back on top by one as Alapag somehow managed to get his team to snap out of an initial shock following Korea’s strong fourth-quarter rally. The stage is now set for a wild finish and Jimmy will star in the final act of what has been an incredible show by Gilas and South Korea. “In situations like that, as an athlete and as a pro, that’s the situations that you dream about,” Alapag said.  “Those are shots that you practice when you were a kid. When the shot clock is winding down, to have an opportunity to knock down a shot. It’s a shot that I practiced thousands of times,” he added. After the Philippines and South Korea traded baskets for the lead, Alapag made perhaps the most underrated play in this crazy and emotional encounter between two basketball rivals. Tasked with inbounding the ball just near underneath his own basket, Alapag found his Talk ‘N Text teammate Ranidel De Ocampo for an open look at three. Swish. Gilas leads, 81-77, with 91 seconds to go. “Ranidel was my favorite target for a very, very long time in my career,” Alapag said on the play that most people probably don’t even remember. “Once I saw that he got open, I wanted to make sure that I gave him as great a pass as possible and Ranidel has been known for a long time to take care of the rest,” he added.   THE EXORCIST “Yeah, I was right under the basket,” Gabe Norwood says with a laugh when asked if he remembers the shot that changed the course of Gilas Pilipinas as a national team. Late in the fourth quarter of what was essentially a heavyweight bout, the Philippines just landed two strong haymakers but South Korea would refuse to go down without a fight, beating the count of 10 each time. Down to the final minute of a crucial grudge match with a World Cup berth on the line, Jimmy Alapag had his hands on the basketball as Gilas would go to its halfcourt set. Jimmy will never let go of said basketball. Up two, Jimmy did what Olsen wished he could 11 years prior. Up two against South Korea in a pivotal semifinal game, Alapag received a screen from Marc Pingris, which was enough to momentarily shake off Kim Tae-sul. With some room, Alapag drifted to his left and let a three-point shot fly. Boom. Gilas leads, 84-79, with 54 seconds to go. The shot would later be remembered as the one that ended the Korean Curse, the one that finally exorcised the Ghost. “The first thought that came to my mind was don’t miss,” Jimmy said of the clutch jumper. “That last one, Ping sets a good screen and I got a clean look. It’s a shot that myself, and Jayson [Castro], and Larry [Fonacier], and Gary [David], and Jeff [Chan], all of us, we practice that shot time and time again after practice. So you know, it was a shot that I was confident in but in that moment, all you’re thinking about was don’t miss,” he added. It’s one thing to be confident in yourself and to be confidednt in your preparation. It’s a different thing to actually perform under such pressure. As soon as Alapag managed to shoot his shot, Gabe Norwood did what any other good teammate would do and got in position to get the offensive rebound. You know, just in case. Gabe got the ball alright, but he got it after it swished through the rim. “When he put the shot up, I tried to crash for the rebound but I basically knew that it was going in,” he said. “I had probably the best view, I was right under the basket. I think caught it after it went through too,” Norwood added. Alapag checked out moments later as the Philippines went to its defensive lineup in order to stop another Korean comeback. South Korea turned to its most effective shooter in Kim and as he rose up to try and answer Alapag’s triple, Norwood met him at the apex for the game’s most dramatic stop. Gabe blocked Kim and Gilas would finish things off with a final Marc Pingris basket on the other end. A historic 86-79 win was complete. “I still get chills thinking about it, to look up and see grown men just breaking down. My wife was trying to hold my kids and she was holding back tears. It was just an awesome moment, the bond that we had on that team, the stuff that we did to get prepare, I think we poured it all out in that game,” Norwood said on the monumental victory. “I think it probably didn’t hit me until the final buzzer sounded. Not just for me but for the entire team, when that final buzzer sounded, it was such a special group of guys and the fact that we could share that moment with not just with each other but the entire country, it’s something I’ll remember for the rest of my life,” Alapag added, savoring the moment of a Philippine win over Korea 28 years in the making.   THE INTRODUCTION Gilas Pilipinas would lose to Iran the next day in the Finals of the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships. The Philippines put up a fight but Hamed Haddadi would prove to be too powerful to stop. It would take another two years for Gilas to beat Iran but that didn’t really matter in the moment. The Philippines is headed to the World Championships for the first time in three decades. The Philippines has beaten South Korea and one singular shot has allowed the Gilas name to be known around the world. Jimmy wouldn’t say that though. At least not directly in that way. “For me, that shot was the biggest for my career. But really, it was our entire team. We’ve gone through so much and that was just one particular play that really culminated the entire game and all the contributions from other guys from Gabe’s defense, to Ping’s rebounding, to Japeth’s rim protecting, to Jayson and LA doing a lot of the legwork,” Alapag said. “Everybody had their part in contribution to the game. After the shot, after the buzzer sounded, it was just a very special moment for us as a team and for Philippine basketball to show that all of the sacrifices, all of the hard work, now it’s given an opportunity to re-introduce ourselves to the world,” he added. Jimmy wouldn’t say it, but his teammates would. That shot of his that beat South Korea in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships introduced the Gilas name to the world. It announced that the Philippines has finally arrived. Gilas’ breakthrough overtime win a year later in Spain against Senegal — a game Jimmy pretty much decided late as well — made it known that Filipinos are here to stay on the World stage. “I would say so, it got us to where we wanted to be in the World Cup. I think we shocked some people there as well. But just the work that went in, I think it showed the country that we can get back to where we want to be as long as you work together,” Norwood said. “Yung puso ni Jimmy, grabe naman. Makikita mo maliit pero gusto lang niya talaga manalo. Ang liit pero parang lion pag nagalit eh, nandoon yung tiwala namin sa kanya. Ano pa ba masasabi mo, Jimmy is Jimmy Alapag,” Pingris would add.   [NOTES: At the time of original publishing, Gilas Pilipinas was fighting to make a return trip to the FIBA World Cup, this time in China in 2019. To secure its slot, the the Philippine national team needed to beat Kazakhstan in Astana plus a loss from Japan, Jordan, and/or Lebanon. One of the teams that can help Gilas is South Korea... ironically. Jimmy Alapag retired from national team play in 2014 and retired playing for good in 2016. He has since made himself a champion basketball coach in the ABL. Marc Pingris suffered an ACL injury in 2018 and is in the process of returning for his PBA team in the current 2019 season. Gabe Norwood is still in Gilas. He’s still an effective two-way weapon. He can still dunk and will stop your best player too.]   [Updated Notes: The Philippines beat Kazakhstan to make the 2019 FIBA World Cup in China. Gilas got help from... South Korea. The Koreans beat Lebanon on the road, allowing Gilas to advance to the World Championships outright with a victory over Kazakhstan.]   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

K-Racs the glue that will hold together Coach Aldin s NCAA First 5

Aldin Ayo has been calling the shots for University of Sto. Tomas from 2018 to present. Before this, the always amiable mentor was at the helm of De La Salle University from 2016 to 2017. And before this, Coach Aldin was the head coach for alma mater Colegio de San Juan de Letran in 2015. Through all of that, he has had a hand in the discovery and the development of young talent for his teams as well as the game planning for the opposing rising stars. Among all of those, who are the best of the best for him? Here is Aldin Ayo's NCAA First 5, as he told ABS-CBN Sports: JIOVANI JALALON The Jalalon of 2015 was not yet the Jalalon of 2016 - you know, the one who drove Arellano University all the way to the Finals. Still, that younger Jalalon posed problems even for Coach Aldin and his "mayhem" in Letran. "A two-way player. He knows his role as a point guard," the latter said of the former. Jalalon's shine as a full-fledged superstar came in the season after Ayo left Intramuros, but the latter has always been a good judge of potential and saw just that in the former. SCOTTIE THOMPSON Unlike Jalalon, Thompson was already at the peak of his powers in Coach Aldin's one and only season in Letran. And so, the fiery tactician had a frontrow seat to the type of all-around impact University of Perpetual Help's proud product can have. "Very, versatile player plus good character," he said. Thompson fell short of winning a game against Coach Aldin's Knights, but without a doubt, the former won the admiration of the latter. KEVIN RACAL Racal does not necessarily get the shine that Mark Cruz - or Rey Nambatac, for that matter - does. However, it cannot be denied that the 6-foot-4 forward is the perfect personification of the versatility Coach Aldin seeks from his players. Whether it be defending Ola Adeogun, dogging Baser Amer, delivering an assist, or drilling a timely three, Racal can do it all - and he did it all to help Letran in its Cinderella run to the title. "He is a winner in all aspects," Ayo said. ART DELA CRUZ Adeogun was far from full strength, Amer got injured in the elimination round, and so, San Beda University's one and only constant was Art Dela Cruz. The do-it-all forward made his presence felt all over for the Red Lions and was the first and foremost reason why they stayed afloat despite the health of their other two big guns. In Dela Cruz, the red and white had, pretty much, what Coach Aldin had in Racal. "One of the most versatile players in college basketball. His basketball IQ is off the charts. He can be a point forward," the former Letran coach said. ALLWELL ORAEME Like all of the above, Oraeme can do damage both on offense and defense. "Rim protector on defense then on offense, he will be the recipient of the playmaking of Jalalon, Thompson, Racal, and Dela Cruz," Coach Aldin said, talking about the back-to-back MVP from Mapua University. Indeed, the Nigerian tower will not be forced to do much too much on offense with his four teammates all capable and confident of making plays - and will just expend his energy standing as a nightmare for opponents at the defensive end. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2020

DoTA 2 star N0tail sees eSports thriving in new normal

With physical distancing being enforced and mass gatherings being prohibited during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, most, if not all major sports have taken big blows.  While most professional sports are slowly getting back on their feet, it might take a while - if ever - for the live sports experience to return to normal.  For eSports, an industry that really doesn’t require physical interaction or mass gatherings, surviving and thriving in the new normal should not be an issue, and DoTA star Johan “N0tail” Sundstien is confident that will be the case.  Speaking to a handful of Filipino media before his 1 on 1 DoTA 2 battle with Filipino gamer Zedrik “Jeff” Dizon, N0tail spoke about how the eSports industry can survive, how it has grown since he began playing, and what Jeff’s 2020 Red Bull r1v1r Runes Championship can do for the Filipino eSports scene.  For the 26-year old native of Denmark, eSports should have little to no problems getting back on track after the COVID-19 pandemic.  “Yeah, I think eSports is in way better shape than other physical sports, for sure. Physical sports, sports in general, have probably made more of a business and they’ve been used to offline events and monetizing fans coming into stadiums, so obviously they’re having a much harder time than we would be,” N0tail explained.  Prior to eSports exploding and becoming a live attraction, tournaments were done mainly online, and N0tail believes that this is one of the industry’s advantages especially in the ’new normal’.  “We come from a place where we used to have online tournaments, we used to do these things online purely, and when [the COVID-19 virus pandemic] happened, I think all streaming and all online entertainment platforms had this opportunity to thrive and to exist. It’s a good time to be playing video games and not doing live music or something like that.”  “The Coronavirus] hit a lot of people pretty hard, but we have a good chance,” he added.  Speaking of the explosion of eSports, N0tail recalls the industry’s humble beginnings and how far it has come now.  “When I started, it was nowhere near what it is today. Today, obviously, we travel the world, have all these tournaments, have so many more viewers than we’ve ever had,” N0tail said. “Humanity really likes games, obviously, chess, sports, any kind of game for entertainment, and we’ve come a very long way. We’re way more professional, and financially, way more stable.”  The prizes now have also come a long, long way from what they used to be, N0tail shared.  “Ten years ago, we were playing for headsets and a couple hundred dollars, and now it’s way, way bigger, for millions. It keeps going up, it keeps getting more traction and attention, and I like to see that trend, I hope it keeps going.”  The Philippines has slowly emerged as a hotbed for eSports talent, and Ateneo’s Zedrik  “Jeff” Dizon could be on his way to becoming a top star following his 2020 Red Bull R1v1r Runes Championship victory.  Apart from the win, Jeff also had the opportunity to go one-on-one with N0tail, Team Captain of the 2-time The Internationals champions Team OG.  For an established name and veteran like N0tail, being able to compete against people from all over the world is always a sign of progress for eSports.  “DoTA connects people, and whenever somebody from one region that might be weaker plays against another region that might be stronger, or even if they’re both strong or equally [matched], DoTA is a game of ideas and experience, so whenever there’s this cross-country or cross-region game happening, I think there’s always progress. It’s the same when we shape a metagame, when those events were happening, all these teams came together, you quickly saw ideas transfer and a meta being formed between regions and, SC might be doing something one way and it might take something that Europe or NA might be doing, so everytime that it happens, I think it’s a postive thing.”  “It makes the ideas evolve and they evolve into something better,” he added.  Jeff came up big against N0tail in their one-on-one match, winning 2-1. Catch the replay HERE.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2020

Erstwhile-confident Pacquiao admits struggling to adjust vs Ugas

After absorbing a unanimous decision loss where his age looked like it was catching up to him, Pacquiao was forced to admit that there was trouble on his end in adjusting to Ugas' style......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

'HatawViva: Baron, Mark, Jeric bida sa Barumbadings; JM-Kim, Diego-Barbie, Janno kanya-kanyang pasabog

Diego Loyzaga, Barbie Imperial, Baron Geisler, Mark Anthony Fernandez, Jeric Raval, JM de Guzman at Kim Molina IN FAIRNESS, talagang maituturing nang pinakabonggang movie company ngayong panahon ng pandemya ang Viva Films. Sa kabila nga ng pagsasara ng mga sinehan sa buong bansa dulot ng health crisis, hindi pa rin natigil ang pagpo-produce nila ng […] The post #HatawViva: Baron, Mark, Jeric bida sa Barumbadings; JM-Kim, Diego-Barbie, Janno kanya-kanyang pasabog appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

AJ Raval now single; says she s open to fall in love with co-star

Actress AJ Raval revealed that she is now single after she and boyfriend Axel Torres broke up. .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 21st, 2021

AJ Raval hiwalay na sa dyowa; open makipagrelasyon sa katrabaho

HIWALAY na ang sexy actress na si AJ Raval sa dyowa nitong si Axel Torres. Inamin ito ng dalaga sa virtual press conference nito parasa kanyang bagong pelikulang “TAYA”. “Marami kaming naging priblema sa career namin kaya nag-end po nang maaga ‘yung relationship namin,” pagbabahagi ng dalaga. Ayon pa sa aktres, ayaw ni Axel ang […] The post AJ Raval hiwalay na sa dyowa; open makipagrelasyon sa katrabaho appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 21st, 2021

Duque does a Biden

Last Monday, US President Biden told Americans and the world that he did not regret his decision to withdraw from Afghanistan rapidly, incompetently and, yes, stealthily (as in the case of the midnight departure from Bagram Airbase). As the Wall Street Journal so graphically noted, Biden was "determined in retreat, defiant in surrender and confident in the rightness of consiging the country to Jihadist rule." .....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Mexican slugger vows to send Magsayo to sleep

CEBU CITY, Philippines — Hard-hitting Mexican Julio “Pollito” Ceja is confident that he will knockout Boholano boxing sensation Mark “Magnifico” Magsayo in their much-awaited world title eliminator showdown in the undercard of Pacquiao-Ugas world title bout on Saturday, August 21 (Sunday, August 22 Manila Time) at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. In their […] The post Mexican slugger vows to send Magsayo to sleep appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Madam Inutz certified ka-freshness na matapos pumirma ng kontrata kay Wilbert Tolentino

MASAYANG inanunsyo ni Wilbert Tolentino na siya na ang talent manager ng viral online seller na si Madam Inutz o Daisy Lopez in real life. Nag-Facebook live si Momshie Wilbert para ipakita ang contract signing ni Madam Inutz na nagdesisyong magpa-manage sa kaniya. Nilinaw naman ni Momshie Wilbert na clear kay Madam Inutz ang kontrata […] The post Madam Inutz certified ka-freshness na matapos pumirma ng kontrata kay Wilbert Tolentino appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Lolit Solis out na bilang talent manager ni Mark Herras; ibinunyag na may malaking cash advance sa GMA7

TULUYAN nang bumitiw bilang talent manager ni Mark Herras si Manay Lolit Solis matapos maging kontrobersyal ang dalawa dahil sa pera. Sa Instagram post nito, kinumpirma niya na simula ngayon ay wala na siyang kinalaman pa sa Kapuso actor. “Masakit man sa loob ko, naisip ko na baka nga mas gumanda pa ang career niya […] The post Lolit Solis out na bilang talent manager ni Mark Herras; ibinunyag na may malaking cash advance sa GMA7 appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Madam Inutz puno ng pagmamahal sa kabila ng pagmumura

AMINADO si Daisy Lopez o mas nakilala bilang Madam Inutz na ang napapanood ng madlang pipol online ay malayo sa Madam Inutz sa totoong buhay. Sa isang exclusive interview niya sa talent manager at host na si Ogie Diaz, ikinuwento ni Madam Inutz ang istorya ng kaniyang buhay. Si Madam Inutz ay sumikat matapos mag-viral […] The post Madam Inutz puno ng pagmamahal sa kabila ng pagmumura appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 18th, 2021

Resbak ni Lolit Solis sa mga haters: Pag nagtanggol ka ng tao, gumamit ka ng utak at puso

USAP-USAPAN ang diumano’y pamamahiya ni Manay Lolit Solis sa dating alagang si Mark Herras matapos mangutang nito ng pera sa dating talent manager. Marami nga ang nakapansin at nag-call out sa ginawa ng talent manager at isa na rito si RR Enriquez. “I refuse to get mad Salve. Pero hindi ko parin palalagpasin ang kakitiran […] The post Resbak ni Lolit Solis sa mga haters: Pag nagtanggol ka ng tao, gumamit ka ng utak at puso appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 18th, 2021

RR Enriquez nakisawsaw sa fake news tungkol kina Lolit Solis at Mark Herras

RR Enriquez, Mark Herras at Lolit Solis BAGO namin sulatin ito ay tinanong namin ang taong nagma-manage ng social media accounts ng kilalang talent manager na si Manay Lolit Solis kung may TikTok account siya. “Walang TikTok teh, Instagram lang,” ang sagot ng admin at editor ni Manay Lolit na si Salve Asis. Dagdag pa […] The post RR Enriquez nakisawsaw sa fake news tungkol kina Lolit Solis at Mark Herras appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2021