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Children less sick from COVID-19, but still spread the virus

For reasons unknown, children rarely have severe symptoms when infected by COVID-19 and may even be a bit less likely to get the disease in the first place, experts told AFP......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMar 14th, 2020

Children less sick but still spread the virus

For reasons unknown, children rarely have severe symptoms when infected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and may even be a bit less likely to get the disease in the first place, experts told AFP. But that doesn’t mean infants, toddlers and teens are not carriers for the new coronavirus, which jumped from animals to […] The post Children less sick but still spread the virus appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMar 14th, 2020

Millions more face English virus restrictions as cases spiral

Millions more people in northern England face stricter coronavirus rules next week, officials said Friday, as reports suggested the government is considering a nationwide lockdown. A digital display shows NHS health advice on the coronavirus in Leeds on October 30, 2020. – West Yorkshire is to be placed under tier three Covid restrictions from November 2, 2020, the strictest level of rules. (Photo by Lindsey Parnaby / AFP) From Monday, nearly 2.4 million residents in five districts of West Yorkshire, including in the city of Leeds, will be barred from socialising with other households indoors. Pubs and bars not serving “substantial meals” must close, alongside casinos and betting shops, while people have also been told to avoid unnecessary travel. The Department of Health said the measures were needed as infection rates in West Yorkshire were among the highest in the country and rising rapidly. The Times reported Friday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson was considering a return to a national lockdown to battle the surge. Johnson was expected to hold a press conference on Monday to announce new restrictions, which would close everything except “essential shops”, schools and universities, the paper said, quoting a government source. In its weekly study of Covid-19 prevalence, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the number of people with the virus had increased to around one in 100 nationwide. “There has been growth in all age groups over the past two weeks; older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest current rates while rates appear to be steeply increasing among secondary school children,” it said. The country’s official science advisory panel warned in a report published Friday that the virus was spreading “significantly” faster and that hospitalisations were rising at a higher rate through England than its predicted “worst-case” scenario drawn up in July. The report said that in mid-October, shortly before new local rules were introduced, around four times as many people were catching Covid than anticipated in the July report. That study warned that 85,000 more people could die during the winter wave. West Yorkshire’s imminent restrictions are the latest step in the UK government’s localised response to the surging transmission, which has come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks. More than 11 million people — about a fifth of England’s population — will be under the tightest measures from next week. Most of the areas in the “very high” category of the government’s three-tier Covid alert system are in northern and central parts of the country. Nottingham became the latest city to enter the highest tier Friday. On Thursday night, young people took to the streets in fancy dress and drank in large groups before a ban on alcohol sales in shops came into force at 2100 GMT. – ‘Targeted’ – The pandemic has hit Britain harder than any other country in Europe, with more than 45,000 people having died within 28 days of testing positive. Case rates are spiralling again after a lull, tracking the situation elsewhere on the continent. England is seeing nearly 52,000 new cases daily, a 47 percent weekly rise, according to the ONS, which conducts its analysis of households with the help of several universities and health bodies, and excludes people in hospitals and care homes.  Britain’s European neighbours and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have reimposed partial lockdowns to try to cut infection rates. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Friday the government would continue its “targeted and focused” strategy of local restrictions in virus hotspots. “The arbitrariness of a blanket approach would be far worse than the effects of trying to be as targeted as possible,” he said. Meanwhile, a new study reported Friday that a Covid-19 variant originating in Spanish farm workers has spread rapidly throughout Europe in recent months and now accounts for most cases in Britain. The variant — called 20A.EU1 — is thought to have been spread from northeastern Spain by people returning from holidays there, according to the study, which is awaiting peer review in a medical journal. There is currently no evidence that the strain spreads faster or impacts illness severity and immunity......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

Dirty Places at Home and Cleaning Products to Use

The Covid-19 is a global pandemic affecting thousands of people. Without a cure in sight, this virus is easily spread with droplets from sneezing or coughing. Healthcare professionals suggest handwashing, covering coughs, and using face masks when sick as preventive measures. Another tip is to stay away from dirty places and to clean homes and […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsSep 24th, 2020

Virus-proofing sports facilities presents a big challenge

By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The jersey-wearing camaraderie. The scent of sizzling sausages. The buzz before a big game. The distinctive atmosphere of live sports, that feeling in the air, will return in time as pandemic restrictions are eased. But will that very air be safe in a closed arena with other fans in attendance? The billions of dollars spent on state-of-the-art sports facilities over the last quarter-century have made high-efficiency air filtration systems more common, thanks in part to the pursuit of green and healthy building certifications. Upgrades will likely increase in the post-coronavirus era, too. The problem is that even the cleanest of air can’t keep this particular virus from spreading; if someone coughs or sneezes, those droplets are in the air. That means outdoor ballparks have high contaminant potential, too. “Most of the real risk is going to be short-distance transmission, people sitting within two, three or four seats of each other,” said Ryan Demmer, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. “It’s not really about the virus spreading up, getting into the ventilation system and then getting blown out to the entire stadium because this virus doesn’t seem to transmit that way. It doesn’t aerosolize that well.” The three hours spent in proximity to thousands of others is part of the fan experience. It's also why major sports leagues have been discussing plans to reopen in empty venues, for now. High-touch areas with the potential to spread the virus — called fomite transmission — are plentiful at the ballgame, of course. Door handles. Stair rails. Restroom fixtures. Concession stands. Hand washing by now has become a societal norm, but disinfectant arsenals need to be brought up to speed, too. “I can’t really find good hand sanitizer easily in stores. So think about trying to scale that up, so everybody who comes into U.S. Bank Stadium gets a little bottle of Purel. Things like that can be modestly helpful,” Demmer said. There is much work to be done. Vigilant sanitizing of the frequent-touch surfaces will be a must. Ramped-up rapid testing capability during pre-entry screening could become common for fans. Minimizing concourse and entry bottlenecks, and maintaining space between non-familial attendees, could be mandatory. Mask-wearing requirements? Maybe. Most experts, including those at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, believe the primary mode of transmission for COVID-19 is close person-to-person contact through breathing, coughing or sneezing but there's no consensus on some of the details. “There’s still widespread disagreement between experts on which mode of transmission dominates for influenza. So the likelihood of us figuring this out soon for this virus is low,” said Joe Allen, director of the Healthy Buildings Program and an assistant professor at Harvard’s School of Public Health. “We may never figure it out, but I also think it’s irrelevant because it’s a pandemic and we should be guarding against all of them.” Including, of course, the air. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers designed the Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) scale to measure a filtration system's effectiveness (from 1-16) at capturing microscopic airborne particles that can make people sick. Not just viruses, but dust, pollen, mold and bacteria. Most experts recommend a MERV rating of 13 or higher, the minimum standard for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. An emerging technology in this area is called bipolar ionization. Connecticut-based AtmosAir has a bipolar ionization air treatment system in about 40 sports venues. Staples Center in Los Angeles was one of the first major sports customers. TD Garden in Boston and Bridgestone Arena in Nashville are among the others who’ve signed on. The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority approved last year a 10-year contract for a little more than $1 million with AtmosAir to install its system in U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Vikings and the first indoor NFL stadium to use it. The building, which measures 1.8 million square feet, has 53 air handling units with AtmosAir tubes installed, including 30 in the seating bowl. The ions act like fresh air, reducing the amount of outside air needed to be introduced for the cleansing process. The protein spikes in the coronavirus particles make them easier to catch and kill, said Philip Tierno, a New York University School of Medicine professor of microbiology and pathology. Said AtmosAir founder and CEO Steve Levine: “We’re never going to create a mountaintop, but we’re going to put in maybe three to four times the ions over the ambient air and then let those ions attack different pollutants in the air. The ions grab onto particles and spores and make them bigger and heavier, so they’re much easier to filter out of the air." The next time fans do pass through the turnstiles, in a few weeks or a few months, in most cases they will probably encounter an unprecedented level of cleanliness. “There will be some controls that are visible, extra cleaning and disinfection, but some of it will be invisible, like for what’s happening in the air handling system,” said Allen, the Harvard professor. “The consumers will decide when they feel comfortable going back, and that’s going to depend on what strategies are put in place in these venues and stadiums and arenas and, most importantly, how well these organizations communicate that to the paying public.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2020

Mystery still shrouds COVID-19 origin

While many scientists are racing to find vaccines to tame the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, other researchers are probing the past, trying to unravel one of the greatest mysteries of the virus: exactly where it came from......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 1st, 2020

I win, you win! (BIR’s 2018 VAPP)

The COVID-19 pandemic has threatened the lives of millions of people. While many have recovered from the virus, it has still resulted in numerous deaths due to the fast spread of the virus because of its airborne nature......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 1st, 2020

Mayor Sara warns Christmas merrymaking to cause faster spread of virus

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 27 November) – Merrymaking during the upcoming Christmas holidays will likely speed up the surge in COVID-19 cases in Davao City early next year, Mayor Sara Duterte said. Duterte raised the alarm during her live interview over Davao City Disaster Radio (DCDR 87.5) on Friday, as she reminded residents to avoid […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsNov 30th, 2020

DOH: More checks for health workers sick, died from COVID-19 released

The health department has reported that more Filipino medical workers infected with the coronavirus have received their compensation nearly nine months since the outbreak of the virus in the country......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 29th, 2020

Child abuse cases on the rise amidst virus pandemic

The incidence of violence against children, mostly by parents and caregivers, has dramatically increased globally during the COVID-19 pandemic as loss of income from lockdown measures have resulted in increased negative feelings and reduced psycho-social well-being in the household, according to a global research conducted by Save the Children......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 27th, 2020

Virus keeps borders shut

WASHINGTON (AFP) — The border closure between the United States and its two neighbors, Canada and Mexico, will be extended until 21 December due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the US secretary of homeland security announced Thursday. “In order to continue to prevent the spread of COVID, the US, Mexico, & Canada will extend the restrictions […] The post Virus keeps borders shut appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsNov 21st, 2020

TURNING POINT: Normalizing Lives

NAAWAN, Misamis Oriental (MindaNews / 20 November) – All over the globe, many bank on the COVID -19 vaccine to return to normal life. But the vaccine is slow in coming and is still far away and the virus is piling the dead everywhere, making people sick just by the thought of it. While waiting […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsNov 20th, 2020

SC asked to hold preliminary conference on anti-terror law pleas remotely

Petitioners represented by the Free Legal Assistance Group urged the Supreme Court to conduct the preliminary conference on the anti-terrorism law case through videoconference, citing COVID-19 risks and the protocol enforced to curb the spread of the virus......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 17th, 2020

Border control in Cebu City to return, Oplan Bulabog underway

CEBU CITY, Philippines — The slight rise of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in Cebu City has prompted the city government to implement measures to prevent the further spread of the virus. Primarily, the city government plans to place tight border controls back in the entries and exits to the city. Mayor Edgardo Labella revealed […] The post Border control in Cebu City to return, Oplan Bulabog underway appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 13th, 2020

Social media becomes emergency helpline at the height of Typhoon ‘Ulysses’

Social media sites on Thursday turned into virtual emergency hotlines as many individuals trapped inside their homes begged to be rescued after Typhoon “Ulysses” dumped heavy rains on Metro Manila and nearby provinces. “Parang awa nyo na po sana may makapansin nito. Kailangan po ng rescue ng pamilya ko sa Montalban (Rizal) (I’m begging and hoping that someone would notice this. My family in Montalban needs to be rescued),” Rowena Bragas said in a Facebook post around 6 a.m. on Thursday “This is urgent!!! Second floor na po ang baha at malakas pa din ang ulan at hangin (The flood has already reached our second floor and the strong winds and heavy rains continue).” Arnel Arevalo, another social media user, added: “Help please! If you know anyone from Montalban, Rizal LGU please let them know that there are still a lot of residents here in Celina Homes 4 who are trapped in their 2nd floor. No sign of rescuers/responder yet. Signal is bad too. Power is out.” Facebook and Twitter users woke up to a number of posts and tweets of people asking for help. These include the viral photos of residents of Rizal province who sought refuge on the roof of their houses after their community was completely submerged in flood waters. Some even had infants in tow. “Sa mga nakakabasa po, patulong. Kailangan po namin ng rescue. Marami pong baby po dito nasa taas na po kami ng bahay, kasama mga kapitbahay po namin. Malapit na po kami abutin, mga 20+ po kami, 10 bata po kasama 5 babies (To anyone who can read this, please help us. We need a rescue team. We have babies with us. We are already on top of our house, with our neighbors. We have 10 children, including five babies here),” Micca Lorreine De Jesus of Montalban town said. The term #RescuePH became trending on Twitter as people seeking assistance used the hashtag to aggregate information of those needing to be rescued. Local government units, including Valenzuela City, used social media to monitor the situation of their constituents, especially those in need of rescue teams. They also resorted to online posting to keep their constituents informed, like what the government of Navotas and Pasay cities did when two vessels ran aground and damaged structures in their areas. As Typhoon “Ulysses,” which reached Signal No. 3, barreled into the National Capital Region, the hotlines of the Armed Forces of the Philippines were overwhelmed with calls, its spokesman, Maj. Gen. Edgard Arevalo, said over DZMM. Despite several evacuation orders enforced a day earlier, many individuals ended up trapped inside their houses. They could no longer find a way out due to rushing waters. In a flood-prone area of Barangay Bagong Silangan in Quezon City, the local government had to deploy at least four rescue boats to fetch the residents who remained in their homes and were trapped, joining the nearly 10,000 individuals who were earlier evacuated. Rescuers, whose operation started as early as midnight, paddled through the waist-deep flood. Many residents, especially of Rizal province and Marikina city, also bore the brunt of the typhoon after losing their houses to the murky flood. Social distancing aimed to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was also hardly observed among the affected individuals as they tried to fit themselves into limited elevated spaces. Some were no longer wearing face masks. The ferocious wind brought by the typhoon toppled trees and torn away scaffolding of several buildings under construction. In Barangay 187 in Caloocan City, a man sustained a leg injury after a tree fell on their house, a certain Cham Oliveros said in a Facebook post......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020

Eastern Samar placed under GCQ anew

TACLOBAN CITY (PNA) – General community quarantine (GCQ) has been imposed in Eastern Samar anew as more stringent health and safety protocols were deemed needed to combat the rising number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases in the province. Governor Ben Evardone on Friday approved Executive Order No. BPE 11-075, placing the entire province under GCQ until November 20. This was the recommendation of the provincial inter-agency task force against Covid-19 after the province recorded 35 new cases in the towns of Guiuan, Gen. MacArthur, Giporlos, and Sacedo on November 4, its highest single-day count since the outbreak. Under GCQ, the movement of individuals will be limited to availing of basic goods and services, and for work in essential industries allowed to operate. The directive also requires persons below 15 years old and above 65 years old, and other vulnerable groups to remain inside their homes at all times, except for essential purposes. All forms of mass gatherings are prohibited, except for the provision of critical government services and humanitarian activities that adhere to prescribed minimum health standards. Meanwhile, the provincial government would allow religious services, but only up to 30 percent of the seating or venue capacity. The province downgraded its quarantine status from GCQ to modified GCQ in June. As of Saturday, the province has a total of 165 coronavirus cases, with 86 recoveries and four deaths, according to the provincial health office. To address the current situation, several local government units in the province have also imposed granular and border lockdowns to facilitate disease surveillance and tracing of suspected Covid-19 carriers and contain the spread of the virus......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 8th, 2020

Long time needed to feel impact of curfew to control virus spread, says health official

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 6 November) – It would take “months or even years” to feel the impact of the 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew in Davao City that was reimposed to control the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), a health official said. Mayor Sara Duterte reimposed the 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsNov 8th, 2020

Red Cross critical to COVID-19 testing

Testing for the presence of the COVID-19 virus, followed by tracking and tracing of those who might have been exposed to infected individuals is one of the key weapons in the arsenal against the spread of the virus......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 6th, 2020

Philippines may see uptick in COVID-19 cases as holidays near — OCTA Research

Professor Guido David urged the public to maintain the downward trend of COVID-19 cases by strictly following health protocols such as wearing of face masks and shields and observing physical distance—measures that are critical in curbing the spread of the virus......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 5th, 2020

Europe lockdown

The exponential rise in COVID-19 infections in Europe and the US has alarmed global businessmen and market investors. Ensuing lockdowns to contain the virus spread, especially in France and Germany, will mean a stalled re-opening of economies in the continent and that the road to recovery is nowhere near......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 30th, 2020

Travel restrictions on resident foreigners

Like most countries in Asia, the Philippines imposed restrictions on the movement of people in and out of the country as a critical component of its response to combat the spread of the COVID-19 virus......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2020