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Letter to the Editor: We are part and partners for change – Nagkahiusang Mag-uumang Organiko

Statement of Nagkahiusang Mag-uumang Organiko on its 2nd Founding Anniversary Celebration The election of President Duterte to office was evident enough to say that the mass majority of the Philippine population is fed-up with the shallow political promis.....»»

Category: newsSource: mindanaoexaminer mindanaoexaminerSep 20th, 2016

Rory McIlroy delivers strong rejection to proposed new tour

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer MEXICO CITY (AP) — Rory McIlroy became the first top player to publicly reject the idea of a proposed new tour, saying he values his choice of where to play over whatever money the Premier Golf League is promising. “I would like to be on the right side of history on this one,” McIlroy said Wednesday at the Mexico Championship. McIlroy said the only thing that could change his mind were if all the top players decided to join, and he doesn't see that happening. “I think it's very split at the moment,” he said. Talk of a Premier Golf League has been around for about six years and picked up momentum — along with serious funding, primarily from Saudi Arabia — in recent months. Organizers have been talking to players and agents the last few months in the Bahamas, Australia and last week in Los Angeles. Phil Mickelson, who played with officials involved during the pro-am in the Saudi International last month, said Sunday he was not ready to announce his intentions but might be ready to state his view publicly by The Players Championship. Tiger Woods has said only that he and his people were looking into it. The idea of the Premier Golf League is to invigorate golf by putting together 12 four-man teams that would be required to play 18 events — 10 of them in the U.S. — that feature 54 holes, no cut and a shotgun start to fit a five-hour broadcast window. Total prize money would be $240 million, and the top player could earn as much as $50 million. McIlroy said money is “cheap.” “Money is the easy part,” McIlroy said. “It shouldn't be the driving factor. Look, for some people it is. And we're professional golfers and we're out here playing golf to make a living. But at the end of the day, I value my freedom and my autonomy over everything else.” PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan sent a memo to players last month that effectively said that because the tour has contracts with title sponsors for a full schedule and television partners, anyone joining the Premier Golf League would have to give up their PGA Tour memberships. The Premier Golf League's schedule would not include the majors. And still to be determined is if the Official World Golf Ranking board — represented by major tours and golf organizations — would allow the league to get ranking points. The world ranking is used to help determine the field for majors. For someone like Woods — the biggest draw in golf — to play in the new league, he might be required to play as often as 22 times a year if the league has an 18-tournament schedule. “Tiger is 44. He's got two young kids,” McIlroy said. “He openly said last week he wants to play 12 times a year, so this league is proposing 18. So he's not going to do it.” Other players have said they studying proposals, though none has announced a decision. “I don't really stand anywhere,” Dustin Johnson said. “Right now, I'm playing on the PGA Tour. But a lot would have to happen for that to change. Like Rory said, if there was a situation where I felt like I had to play, then I would. But for right now, I'm playing on the PGA Tour.” The PGA Tour policy board's next meets on March 3, the week of the Arnold Palmer Invitational. Prospects of the league was discussed at a players meeting at Torrey Pines in January, and at with the 16-member Player Advisory Council last week at Riviera. When first asked about the new league at Torrey Pines last month, McIlroy said golf was entering a new era and the Premier Golf League proposal had exploited a few areas of weakness, without detailing what they were. While he said then he didn't believe it was the best way to go, McIlroy suggested it could be a “catalyst for some changes on this tour that can help it grow and move forward.” As an example, he mentioned rewarding top players. He left no doubt where he stood on Wednesday. “The more I've thought about it, the more I don't like it,” he said. “The one thing as a professional golfer in my position that I value is the fact that I have autonomy and freedom over everything that I do.” He used the World Golf Championships in Mexico as an example. Eight players from the top 50, including Woods and Brooks Koepka, decided not to play this week. “If you go and play this other golf league, you're not going to have that choice,” he said. “I've never been one for being told what to do, and I like to have that autonomy and freedom over my career, and I feel like I would give that up by going to play this other league. “For me, I'm out,” he said. “My position is I'm against it until there may come a day that I can't be against it. If everyone else goes, I might not have a choice. But at this point, I don't like what they're proposing.” McIlroy referenced Arnold Palmer speaking out against Greg Norman's proposed world tour from the 1990s, in which the top 30 players in the world would meet at locations around the world. From that uprising, the PGA Tour developed the World Golf Championships in 1999, which brought together the top players from six tours around the world......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2020

NBA postpones media sessions in Shanghai amid China rift

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press NBA Commissioner Adam Silver told the Brooklyn Nets and Los Angeles Lakers on Wednesday that the league is still expecting them to play as scheduled this week, even while the rift between the league and Chinese officials continued in ways that clearly suggested the two planned games in Shanghai and Shenzhen were anything but guaranteed. The NBA called off scheduled media sessions Wednesday for both teams. At least two other NBA events to be held Wednesday before the start of the China games were canceled as part of the fallout that started after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey posted a since-deleted tweet last week that showed support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong. "Given the fluidity of the situation, today's media availability has been postponed," the league said. They were not rescheduled Wednesday, though having them on Thursday — game day in Shanghai — remains possible. Later Wednesday in Washington, a bipartisan group of lawmakers — including the rare alignment of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York — sent a letter to Silver saying the NBA should show the "courage and integrity" to stand up to the Chinese government. They asked the NBA to, among other things, suspend activities in China until what they called the selective treatment against the Rockets ends. "You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government's targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it," the lawmakers told Silver. The NBA did not have any immediate comment on the letter, and it was unclear if Silver had even seen the document. In Shanghai, the mood surrounding the game that — if played — will feature LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and other big NBA names was anything but festive. An NBA Cares event that was to benefit the Special Olympics was called off, as was a "fan night" celebration that was to be highlighted by the league announcing plans to refurbish some outdoor courts in that city. And workers in multiple spots around Shanghai were tearing down large outdoor promotional advertisements for Thursday's Lakers-Nets game. The teams are also supposed to play Saturday in Shenzhen. Chinese smartphone maker Vivo has joined the list of companies that have suspended ties with the NBA for now, only adding to the uncertainty surrounding the China games. Vivo was a presenting sponsor of the Lakers-Nets games, and on Wednesday there was no reference to the game in Shanghai on the list of upcoming events scheduled at Mercedes-Benz Arena. Other firms such as apparel company Li-Ning announced similar moves earlier this week, as the rift was just beginning. Silver said Tuesday in Tokyo that he supports Morey's right to free speech. Several Chinese companies have suspended their partnership with the NBA in recent days, and Chinese state broadcaster CCTV said it will not broadcast the Lakers-Nets games. "I'm sympathetic to our interests here and to our partners who are upset," Silver said. "I don't think it's inconsistent on one hand to be sympathetic to them and at the same time stand by our principles." All around China, stores that sell NBA merchandise were removing Rockets-related apparel from shelves and many murals featuring the Rockets — even ones with Yao Ming, the Chinese great who played for Houston during his NBA career — were being painted over. Effects were even felt in at least one NBA arena Tuesday night. In Philadelphia, where the 76ers were playing a Chinese team — the Guangzhou Loong Lions — two fans were removed by arena security for holding signs and chanting in support of Hong Kong. The signs read "Free Hong Kong" and "Free HK." The sentiment was not different from Morey's since-deleted tweet last week of an image that read, "Fight For Freedom. Stand With Hong Kong." The 76ers and Wells Fargo Center, the team's home arena, released statements Wednesday confirming that the fan removal took place and explaining why. "During the second quarter of last night's 76ers game, Wells Fargo Center security responded to a situation that was disrupting the live event experience for our guests," the arena's statement said. "After three separate warnings, the two individuals were escorted out of the arena without incident. The security team employed respectful and standard operating procedures." The NBA is not the first major corporation to deal with criticism from China over political differences. Mercedes-Benz, Delta Air Lines, hotel operator Marriott, fashion brand Zara and others also have found themselves in conflicts with China in recent years. After Morey's tweet was deleted, Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta said Morey does not speak for the organization. Joe Tsai, who recently completed his purchase of the Nets and is a co-founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, has said the damage to the NBA's relationship with China "will take a long time to repair." ___ Reynolds reported from Miami. AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston in Philadelphia and Associated Press writer Yanan Wang in Beijing contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 9th, 2019

Private schools, forgotten partners in PH education

With June — the traditional month for the opening of classes — just a day away, education has risen to the top of national discourse. Since March 2020, the coronavirus pandemic has dominated the public agenda. And since then, classes have been suspended, as part of quarantine protocols. With the coronavirus disease 2019 threat lingering, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated News1 hr. 52 min. ago

Ateneo s Fab 5: The Fearless Underdogs of UAAP Volleyball

(This story was originally published on April 20, 2018) Newly-appointed head coach Roger Gorayeb looked at his line-up heading into UAAP Season 71. A champion mentor of NCAA powerhouse San Sebastian College - Recoletos, Gorayeb had in his hands a gargantuan task of rebuilding the Ateneo de Manila University women’s volleyball program. Just a few months before, Ronald Dulay, the mentor before him, landed a trio of blue chip recruits who were fresh from a successful stint in the Palarong Pambansa. Angeline "Dzi" Gervacio, Fille Saint Cainglet and Jamenea "Jem" Ferrer just joined the Katipunan-based squad. Gervacio and Cainglet were products of St. Scholastica's College in Manila while Ferrer was a gem from Hope Christian School under girl’s volleyball guru Jerry Yee. Looking at his 15-woman line-up with the season just a few months ahead, Gorayeb knew he needed to do something drastic. The roster just won’t do. Talking to then athletic director Ricky Palou and team manager Tony Boy Liao, the mentor told the team officials that he intended to cut five players from the list. One could just imagine the shock in their faces. “Nakita ko may line-up pero player-playeran lang yung ganoon bang tipo, 15 ata yun. Sabi ko ‘Magtatanggal ako ng lima then magre-recruit ako,’” he said. The three rookies were in. Middle Bea Pascual, Kara Acevedo and libero Steph Gabriel retained their spots. He needed more. “Sa mga tinira kong players, si Kara Acevedo sabi niya, ‘Coach mayroong player ang ICA (Immaculate Conception Academy) na gumraduate naka-exam na rito pasado.’ Sabi ko, ‘Sige papuntahin mo,’” said Gorayeb. It was Gretchen Ho. “Sa akin kasi ang talagang nagyaya sa akin si Coach Ron Dulay. Si Kara Acevedo teammate ko and she’s been recruited by Ateneo. So one summer wala akong magawa naki-train lang ako noon tapos nagustuhan nila ang laro ko and then fourth year noong graduate na ako I passed the ACET then niyayaya na nila ako,” Ho said. “Then nagbago ng coach na si Coach Roger and dun niya ako nakita.”   “Pagdating ko ng March (sa Ateneo) wala na akong way para maka-recruit pa. Ang nangyari yung tatlo accepted na kaagad. Si Gretchen tinanong ko sabi ko, ‘ano ba ang laro mo?’ Sabi niya the usual panggitna, tres,” Gorayeb recalled. “So sinubukan ko pero ang laro niya tres hindi quick. Siya panggitna pero hindi quicker na gusto ko saka yung height niya (maliit). Kaya lang si Gretchen takbo ng takbo, mahilig magtatakbo so sabi ko sige pwede na yan. Wala namang player na during that time. So kinuha ko si Gretchen.” Gorayeb just needed just one more. “Ngayon nagkaroon ng STCAA (Southern Tagalog Calabarzon athletic association) eh kulang pa ako ng isa, wala akong panggitna. Ang gitna ko during that time si Bea lang tapos si Gretchen so wala akong pamalit. So naisipan ko may nakita ako sa STCAA,” he said. He spotted a lanky player from Canossa Academy-Lipa, Aillysse Nacachi. “Sabi ko kay Sir Tony pagtyagaan ko na lang ito kahit hindi naman kalakasan at wala naman na rin akong choice na makapili kasi rush ang pagdating ko dyan. Nakiusap lang sila sa akin na magbuo ako ng team kasi si Ronald nag-resign,” said Gorayeb. Another freshman could’ve had ended up with Ateneo, Hope’s libero Melissa Gohing. But a few obstacles prevented her from fulfilling her promise to join Ferrer in Ateneo. She instead chose to join the ladies in green and white in Taft.    SOMETHING PROMISING December 7, 2008. Far Eastern University Gym. Excitement filled the air. Fans, mostly volleyball purists and some who just came to support their classmates or were just curious to see a new spectacle after the basketball season ended, slowly settled in their seats for the women’s division’s second game. It was Adamson University, the previous year’s runner-up, which just visited the turf of their arch nemesis and defending champion FEU, which was led by that era’s finest and most popular volleybelle Rachel Anne Daquis. Fans wanted to see if the Lady Falcons still had the same firepower they had the previous season with the loss of top setter Janet Serafica and power hitter Sang Laguilles. A rookie-laden Ateneo squad should be easy pickings with Angela Benting, rookie Pau Soriano and libero Lizlee Anne Gata in the roster. Besides the Lady Falcons got the Lady Eagles’ number. Or so they thought. “Naalala ko nu’ng time namin sinasabi sa amin ng seniors namin na, ‘Hay naku ang lakas ng Adamson, never kami nanalo dyan,’” Cainglet, now happily married to Taguig mayor Lino Cayetano and with three beautiful children, recalled.  But the Lady Eagles stunned Adamson in the opening set. The Lady Falcons took the next two frames. Ateneo stole the fourth.  “Ako naalala ko ano eh, parang alam namin na lahat kasi kami palaban. Nasa amin yun. Tapos binigyan kaming lahat ng chance to be in the first six so parang dream come true,” said Ho, now an ABS-CBN host. “Naalala ko rin na palaban kaming lahat kumbaga nothing to lose eh so ang ano namin, sumasabay kami sa laro and nu’ng nakita na namin na ‘Ay kaya pala natin ‘to guys. Kaya pala naming lumaban.’” Still, Adamson had the upper hand in experience. The Lady Falcons, used to pressure and were steady at crunch time, outlasted Ateneo.           The young Katipunan-based squad fell short, 25-22, 22-25, 15-25, 25-15, 8-15. But for the Fab 5, it was a loss that felt like a resounding victory. “Parang sobrang natutuwa kami and everybody in the crowd, kaya siguro kami natawag na Fab 5 kasi rookies kami pero kahit ganoon palaban kami,” said Ho. “Saka close game. Five sets yun.” However, it was the first of five five-set matches that Ateneo will drop that season including one in the second round against the Manilla Santos-bannered De La Salle University. “Pero ang problema di kami nananalo ng five sets. Parang ilan lang ang naipanalo namin na ganoon. Feeling ko na-overwhelm kami na ‘Uy nananalo tayo.’ May ganoong disbelief ng konti pero alam namin na may ibubuga kami,” said Ho. “Definitely, our rookie season was full of five-set matches. It was tough, we felt like we were so close, but still so far away. At some point, it gave us frustration also. We just couldn't figure out that time what is it that's still lacking because we couldn't win the five-set matches,” according to Nacachi. “People said, it was because the team was still so inexperienced. We still didn't have the tenacity unlike of those more matured teams. But we didn't take it as bad, it was a learning experience for us all at the end. We had to learn how to develop that finishing will to be able to win games like that in the future.” The Fab 5 finished their rookie season with a 6-8 slate at fifth spot.   ‘MAY MEDAL NA TAYO’ Gorayeb remembered on their second year the look on Pascual’s face in their last elimination game match against Adamson. Already wrapping up their first win over the Lady Falcons, Pascual was giddy. “Natatawa nga ako dyan kay Bea kasi papanalo na kami nu’n tapos sumesenyas na siya ng tres. Sabi ko, ‘Hoy anong ginagawa mo?’ Yun pala sobrang saya na niya kasi for the first time in 30 years magkaka-medal na sila,” he said. It was the most important match of the season for the Lady Eagles. With the Fab 5 already in their sophomore year, Ateneo was already making great strides. The Lady Eagles closed that season’s elims with five straight wins capped off with a victory over Adamson. Ateneo posted a 10-4 win-loss mark to enter the Final Four legitimately. “Ang nangyari kasi nu’ng time nila Charo (Soriano) kaya sila nakapasok sa semis kasi may nag-squeal na si (Jacq) Alarca di pala naka-enroll nu’n kaya na-forfeit mga laro ng La Salle,” said Gorayeb. The Fab 5 proved that they were not just a bunch of much-hyped up pretty faces. They backed it up with their skills on court. It didn’t matter that Ateneo were swept by eventual champion University of Sto. Tomas in the Final Four.      But the podium finish of Season 72 was short-lived. Adamson got its revenge in the last game of Season 73 elims, bumping off the Lady Eagles for a podium finish. The loss put Ateneo in a collision course with the twice-to-beat DLSU, who could’ve completed an elims sweep if not only for a forfeited match against University of the East after UAAP found out that Carmela Garbin and Clarisse Yeung participated in a ‘ligang labas’ while the season was onoing, in the Final Four. Ateneo gave the Lady Spikers a scare before succumbing in another heartbreaking five-set match. The Lady Eagles finished fourth but that lone semis game gave Ateneo and its maturing Fab 5 enough experience to dream for something big – A ticket into the Finals.      ‘HINOG NA KAYO’ The first three years saw the gradual improvement for Ateneo. But Season 74 proved to be the turning point for the Fab 5. A fresh new recruit from University of Sto. Tomas high school, who just completed a year of residency, came into picture and with the Fab 5 armed with years of experience, the Lady Eagles’ fate will forever be changed. Alyssa Valdez, a highly recruited open spiker just like Gervacio, Cainglet-Cayetano and Ferrer years back, gave renewed excitement for the Ateneo faithful. “Alyssa's joining with Ateneo was a great turning point for us. We needed as much support we can get, and Alyssa's entrance to the team was a great boost to the team's morale,” said Nacachi. “The girl is a powerhouse and we felt like with her presence, the team finally became solid.” “We were able to play around with the positions and the rotations, since we had different versatile open players who can also greatly play other roles,” she added. “We were also able to formulate a lot of plays and attacks because Alyssa can generally do all kinds; open, running, quick, name it all. She gave the team the power and the versatility that we previously lacked from the past seasons.” Social media was just gaining traction then but the Lady Eagles were already on the radar of volleyball purists through online forums. For the first time, Ateneo was considered a legitimate contender.   The Fab 5 proved it by winning 11 games in the elimination round, losing only to UST once and dropping two against the Lady Spikers. Valdez’s arrival gave Ferrer an even broader option on offense. It eased the scoring load off the shoulders of Cainglet and Gervacio, who was then moved to an opposite position. “I guess sakto lang din yung dating niya because by that time Kara Acevedo graduated so someone had to fill in her spot so coach Roger decided for me to move to utility or opposite,” said Gervacio. “And then sakto Alyssa naman could fill in the spot na other open spiker.” “So timing din na we had all the pieces put together at the right time,” she added. With a good performance in the elims despite missing a legit middle in Bea Pascual and the entry of Aerieal Patnongon barred by academic problems, Ateneo finished second and for the first-time was armed with a twice-to-beat advantage in the stepladder semifinals. The Lady Eagles faced an experienced Tigresses side in the last stepladder semis stage. UST just came from a hard-fought four-set do-or-die match against FEU and were banking on their four-set win over Ateneo in the second round to force another sudden death. Ateneo’s date with destiny was sealed with a four-set win over the Tigresses, who then bid goodbye to Maika Ortiz and Judy Anne Caballejo. “Pinu-push na rin kami ni Coach Roger noon eh, ‘Hinog na kayo ngayon. Kasi dalawang taon na lang, kailangan makapasok na kayo sa Finals,’” said Ho. “Somehow senior na rin kami,” added Cainglet.  “Season 74 was really the target season for us to be in the finals and target even to win the championship,” according to Nacachi. “During this time, we were already thinking we could not afford to not go in the finals.” “So it was with our mindset and our level of commitment that we were able to finally reach our goal of reaching the finals,” she added. “We had enough experience that time already, and it was really time for us to show the level of game maturity the team had obtained from the past seasons.” But then they had to face an unbeaten team. Unscathed in 14 games, De La Salle University was poised to complete a perfect season. The Lady Eagles spoiled it. Ferrer outplayed DLSU setter Mika Esperanza, 57-42, in excellent sets as Ateneo handed the Lady Spikers its first loss after 25 straight victories in a come-from-behind 23-25, 28-26, 25-23, 25-17, Finals opener win. Witnessed by 3,002 spectators inside the then The Arena in San Juan, all of the Fab 5 produced points. Cainglet had 19 behind Valdez’s 24, Gervacio scored 12, Ho had 10, Nacachi finished with five while Ferrer had one. Gorayeb made a big gambit and it worked. “Dahil sa wala kong panggitna, yung laro namin ng La Salle, ginawa kong quicker si Alyssa. Kasi si Alyssa nakakapalo. Nagulat si Ramil (de Jesus) dun.” It was a big win. A huge upset. Unfortunately, Ateneo needed to win two more.  DLSU held a thrice-to-beat advantage.   THAT SWAG After Ateneo made a miracle in Game One, fans began to feel a new rivalry born. The attendance spiked. From just 3,000 spectators, the gate attendance more than doubled its size. The interest was there. Fans of traditional powers began to notice the Lady Eagles as a rising team. For the first time, a squad with no previous championship experience except for a title during the Marcos era in a different collegiate league, made a giant jolt. Everybody wanted to see what these girls would do next.    The Lady Eagles, still high on adrenaline after their Game 1 upset, took the opening set in Game 2. But just like in their opener, a well-experienced DLSU squad adjusted to take the next three frames to move a step closer to a repeat crown. With then Rookie of the Year Ara Galang, Season Most Valuable Player Aby Marano, an intimidating Michele Gumabao and a very efficient Finals MVP Cha Cruz teaming up for the kill, the Lady Spikers ripped Ateneo apart in Game 3 in straight sets, 25-16, 25-22, 25-13. “Sabi nga ni Dzi na nadyan na lahat eh. So I guess noong Season 74 nandoon na pero may kulang pa rin,” said Ho. “I guess we we’re able to make it to the Finals pero wala pa kaming championship experience.” Ferrer agreed. "Siguro ang kulang yung championship experience kasi nasa La Salle na ‘yun eh. Ilang years na silang nagpa-finals, nag-champion and for Ateneo doon pa lang namin sinimulan," said the three-time Best Setter. Lacking championship experience is one thing, but Ateneo during that time wasn’t ready for DLSU’s most feared weapon: the Lady Spikers’ swag.  “They have that swag,” said Gervacio. “Everyone knows about it naman. It’s really Coach Ramil’s style talaga kasi as I remember when we were first year, four out of six of the players inside the court were rookies and even if we go against the powerhouses UST, FEU, Adamson, hindi sila yung nakikita nyo na kapag championship na rivalry, na swag, angas, stare down. Pero La Salle talaga kahit sino ang kalaban nila they’ll bring that attitude inside the court.” That Finals series cemented a new rivalry that will become one of the most celebrated in the sport. “I think it also helped that Ateneo-La Salle basketball didn’t face also,” said Gervacio. “Siyempre nandoon ang hunger for the rivalry eh and timely din na its been Ateneo-La Salle na rin sa volleyball.”   CLOSING A CHAPTER The Fab 5 were now in their fifth and last year. They wanted to leave a winning legacy. The pieces were already there. Gorayeb had at his disposal five seniors, a rising star in Valdez, a sophomore middle in Amy Ahomiro, a versatile Ella De Jesus, a steady libero in Denden Lazaro and a new kind of weapon – a massive crowd that can turn any venue into a sea of blue.              As expected, the second installment of the Ateneo-DLSU rivalry was set into place. Both sweeping their semis opponents. The Lady Spikers crushed National University while the Lady Eagles shot down Adamson. Game One was a shocker. DLSU heading into the Finals are on a 14-game roll but were stunned in the first two sets with Ateneo stepping on the gas. But a string of miscues, mostly from the service line, did the Lady Eagles in as they allowed the Lady Spikers to force a decider. DLSU, smelling blood, punished Ateneo to eke out a 20-25, 17-25, 25-22, 25-22, 15-6, victory inside the Big Dome witnesses by 17,342-strong gate attendance. Then the series transferred to a newly-built, state-of-the-art Mall of Asia Arena that drew a crowd of 18,799. The first two frames were frustrating for the Lady Eagles.   Ateneo came back to life in the third set to gain a 9-5 lead. But DLSU easily erased it with Ateneo crumbling under pressure. The Lady Spikers were on an onslaught. Sophomore Galang pushed DLSU at matchpoint with a cold-blooded ace that went in a few inches from the baseline. The score, 24-16. It was a tense moment for the Fab 5. A long rally ensued in the next play. Gervacio, with all her might pounded a kill. Her hand making a great contact on the ball off Ferrer’s backset.     Smack! The ball ricocheted off the hands of DLSU’s Wensh Tiu before falling on the same landing area of Gervacio, who tried to dive for a dig together with Lazaro. DLSU swept Ateneo, 25-23, 25-20, 25-16. Game over.          “Kahit hindi kami nanalo alam naming ibinigay namin ang lahat namin, all-out talaga kaya wala kaming pagsisisi,” said Ho. It was the end of the Fab 5 era, but they left more than what any of them could have imagined. "I remember so many people or fans telling me that they started really watching UAAP Volleyball because of our batch. And that is really touching and fulfilling to know. Knowing that you were able to leave an impact like that to people. We were not able to bring even a single championship to our school, Ateneo, but we were able to touch a lot of people's hearts despite that," Nacachi shared. The Fab 5 closed a colorful chapter of Ateneo volleyball in tears. They were there during the Lady Eagles’ birth pains. They labored. They shed tears, blood and sweat. They laid the foundation for something big. The Fab 5 planted the seeds that would eventually bear fruit and would change the course of Ateneo women’s volleyball program forever. Glory didn’t happen during their time. It started in theirs.    Amidst the roar of the crowd, the falling confetti, banging of drums and the echoing chant of ‘Animo La Salle’ from the sea of green, the Fab 5 hugged each other tight. They found comfort in each other. It was their time to say goodbye. For those who remained – Valdez, Lazaro, Ahomiro, De Jesus – the defeat added fuel to their already blazing desire to bring glory for the blue and white. They were the next in line, heirs to an unfinished business. WATCH: FAB 5 Reunion Part 1 and Part 2 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 24th, 2020

Soul Surfer Bethany Hamilton shares her incredible story on Rich Franklin s Franklin Speaking podcast

Bethany Hamilton’s inspiring story has captured the imagination of millions who have been moved by her unbreakable spirit in the face of adversity.   The American surfer inspired people across the globe when she returned to the sport she loved, despite the loss of her left arm in a shark attack. Her following has continued to grow because of her subsequent success, and recently, her 2019 documentary, Unstoppable, which is currently streaming on Netflix.  Rich Franklin is also no stranger to adversity. He battled for acceptance and success to become recognized as the best middleweight mixed martial artist in the world as UFC Champion, before becoming Vice President of the world’s largest martial arts organization, ONE Championship.  The hall-of-fame athlete has also encountered many fascinating characters during his career, particularly as the host of Rich Franklin’s ONE Warrior Series, and his new video podcast, Franklin Speaking, which takes the audience on a deep dive as he and co-host Jonathan Fong discover their guests’ stories.   Bethany is among the most colorful and inspiring characters Rich has met. After she first got on a board aged 8, she was a precocious talent in the surfing world who gained her first sponsor just a year later. However, aged 13, a shark took her arm when she was out surfing with a friend.  Losing a limb, particularly at such a young age, would have made most ordinary people give up on their dreams of surfing entirely. But despite such a traumatic ordeal, Bethany was back among the waves just a month later and went on to win competitions all over the world.  She also appeared everywhere from Oprah to Ellen and wowed viewers with her exceptional strength of will. Soon, Bethany evolved from being seen as an unfortunate victim into an inspirational role model.    At times, however, being in the limelight comes at a cost. Having made the transformation from the world of education to mixed martial arts, Rich can relate to the prospect of having to adjust to a sudden wave of attention, and asked about that on the show.  “How did you manage? Especially at that age, because I had trouble with this. I used to be a high school teacher and, what seemed like overnight, my life turned into something where people were standing in line for autographs. How did you manage this at the age of 13?”  Bethany’s responses offered a glimpse into just how difficult it was for her to deal will so much attention at such a tender age.  “It took me a long time to get to a place where I was more accepting of it. The only thing that kept me sane was having good friends and surfing. I think over time, I just saw the beauty in storytelling, and sharing my life was really impactful, and I saw the value of that. I wanted to let that be a part of my life.”  The 30-year-old is certainly no stranger to big challenges. There was one, in particular, which left Rich in awe as he quizzed her about surfing ‘Jaws’ in Maui, which is home to some of the biggest waves in the world.  ‘’The wave could literally take out a house. It’s just so enormous and powerful with the type of waves that are death-defying. I’ve always had a drive for bigger surf, even when I was younger. I was always chasing bigger waves than my peers.”  Bethany, now a mother of two, is a multiple award-winner, has had a film and numerous documentaries made about her inspirational life story, and has published eight books. Her latest venture is an online course entitled Unstoppable Year, which she broke down to Rich and Jonathan.   “I’m taking all of the things I’ve learned along the way or the things I’ve done that have empowered me to overcome and kind of live a somewhat unstoppable life. I’m not perfect, but kind of carrying on life with that unstoppable feeling and knowing that we can overcome when tough stuff comes our way, we can be a blessing to others. We can live thoughtfully and we can change our mindset from negative to positive. Every little choice we make can have a huge impact on our future. We’re packaging that into something really rad and life-changing for people. It really is changing people’s lives, so it’s super fun to be a part of.”  The way Bethany tackles conquering adversity and crushing extraordinary challenges impressed Rich, and their chat offered a fascinating look at how far a strong mindset can get you.  Though she was one of the first guests on the show, her story has set a high bar for what’s to come in the future.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 19th, 2020

Palace: DILG not exerting extra effort in pushing for charter change

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said the DILG's priority is to respond to COVID-19 but also said that pushing for charter change is part of the agency's mandate......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 18th, 2020

Is Virtual Racing The Future of Exercise?

This article was originally published on womaninaction.ph It’s one thing to say you’ll keep working out during quarantine, and it’s another to be constantly motivated and consistent about it. Professional athletes usually have targets to hit that keep them motivated, or games to prepare for. For enthusiasts, signing up for races does the trick, because races feel like “tournaments” they have to be in condition for. With games cancelled and races postponed, how do you stay motivated in a COVID world? For those who have been raring to go out of their homes, it’s a good thing that restrictions on working out outside have already been somewhat eased. Walking, jogging, running and cycling are now allowed. However, is it recommended that face masks be worn and social distancing must be observed (at least 2 meters). With all of these measures in place, can virtual racing be the future of exercise? Don Velasco, a professional triathlete and coach, says joining the IronMan Virtual Races every weekend has helped him and his clients stay disciplined. “The hardest part is staying motivated. Because some people lose sight of why we’re doing this. Like if walang race, bakit pa magtrain (if there’s no training, why train?). But it transcends that. It’s about having this lifestyle.”, Velasco says. Apart from personal training, Don has been racing with his athletes as a way to monitor and motivate them. How does it work? Since swimming is not allowed at this time, the IronMan Virtual Club features challenges centered around running and cycling, much like a duathlon. The way it works is you register online (for free) and then sync your tracking device with your account. You can also train with different coaches and groups on their website. “I think running and cycling are actually great options during the MECQ because it's relatively easy to perform social distancing while doing them. I feel that running and cycling will be bigger in the next few months. Running is a relatively easy sport to get into and needs minimal equipment to participate in. Cycling, on the other hand, will not only be an excellent form of exercise, it will even be a great means of transportation as well. At the end of the day, more and more people will value health and wellness because of this pandemic.” For the weekly IronMan races, there are rankings based on your time, as you get to compete with all the other athletes around the world. Training and racing earns you points that add up to rewards with IronMan partners, but that’s not what we’re working hard for right? Want to join a virtual race, even as a beginner? Apart from IronMan, World Vision has come up with its own virtual race called World Vision Run for Children to help support its causes on Education and Food & Nutrition. You can choose from the different distances — 21km, 50km, 100km and 200km, and you must complete it in a span of a month and a half, from June 15 to July 31. Unlike IronMan, this race has a much simpler process. No need for syncing of apps, you just need to submit screenshots as proof of your progress. When this is all verified, your finisher shirt and medal will be delivered to your doorstep. “We want you to have the freedom to run where, when, how often and how far you prefer. Walk, run, ride a bike whether indoors or outdoors, in your treadmill or on a trail, every morning or just one time, whether you’re alone or with your friends. As long as your heart beats for children”, according to World Vision’s press release. The proceeds of the virtual race will go to the funding of 4,500 sanitation kits and 28,000 back to school kits for all registered kids of World Vision. You may register at www.worldvision.org.ph/virtual-run-for-children/. Honesty system Virtual racing is all about doing your own workouts, tracking your progress and submitting reports. It is definitely possible to cheat but remember that when you do, you’re only cheating on yourself. We know it isn’t easy to be disciplined in this pandemic, especially with all the limitations, adjustments and changes, but here is what Don Velasco says. “Focus on what you can do, not what you can't do. Having a more positive mindset will not only influence your success, it can also help a lot with mental and emotional well-being. Adjust your goals. Most things in our world are put on hold. Having the same set of goals for yourself is somewhat unrealistic. Maybe adjusting a few things here and there are in order. This can mean changing the timeframe in which you want to achieve something or adjusting your definition of "success." Remember, the mere fact we're alive and well is already cause for celebration. Being able to workout and enjoy are just bonuses!”. Spoken like true athlete.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 17th, 2020

Globe partners with DOST to improve COVID-19 reporting, tracing via TanodCOVID

As the country battles the COVID-19 pandemic, Globe continues to do its part in keeping families connected during these challenging times, while assisting organizations and government agencies in flattening the curve. Through its innovative developer group Globe Labs, the telco giant is once again taking new steps by partnering with the Department of Science and Technology - Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD) for the implementation of a new online platform called TanodCOVID. .....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 12th, 2020

UP Men s Basketball players stay fighting amidst COVID-19

The whole world of sports has come to a halt because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but the University of the Philippines Fighting Maroons Men’s Basketball Team (UP MBT) stay fighting. Every member of the team is optimistic that Filipinos and the Philippines will get through the difficult challenges they are facing and are staying positive in words and deeds. Fighting Maroons head coach Bo Perasol has reminded his players to put in the same heart and passion they show in the game into their response to the pandemic, encouraging them to practice teamwork and find ways to help those who are affected by the scourge of the coronavirus. “During these trying times, our “never give up” attitude on court should be evident in how we battle this pandemic together as a team. We are optimistic that we can bounce back and come out stronger. While we face our own personal battles, let’s not forget our fellow Filipinos who are greatly affected by this virus. Let’s do our share, no matter how big or small,” said Perasol. The ongoing Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) and the General Community Quarantine (GCQ) have prohibited sports-related mass gatherings like training, competitions and tournaments. Holed up in their respective homes, the Maroons still find ways to stay competitive and in shape, both physically and mentally. UAAP Season 82 team captain Noah Webb says they “try our best to stay in shape by doing our workouts at home since we can't go to the gym. Our coaches are always guiding us and giving us programs to follow. It’s also very important for us to stay mentally tough since this is a different opponent we are facing.” UP MBT team manager Atty. Agaton Uvero said it is also important for the team and the players to be resilient since a lot of things will change and new protocols will be implemented even after the ECQ is lifted. “Our primary concern will always be the safety of each and every one. But we will stay committed to keeping the team intact so we can still give our best performance with or without games in the near future,” Atty. Uvero said. He reiterated his gratitude to all the team’s fans, supporters, and sponsors who continue to support the Fighting Maroons and their various initiatives. “We will always stay thankful to our fans who never tire of supporting us whether we are in active competition or not. And we will always be indebted to our partners and sponsors -- Robinsons Retail Group, STATS Performance Apparel, Palawan Express Pera Padala, and PayMaya -- for remaining committed to the team despite difficult times like these. Their support and their various efforts to provide assistance and relief to the frontliners and those most affected by the ECQ inspire us and buoy up our spirits,” Atty. Uvero added.   UPMBT players and alumni along with various UP teams and organizations sprang to action soon after the ECQ was declared. They initiated efforts to provide frontliners with necessary items like personal protective equipment (PPEs) and meals. They also reached out to affected communities with rice and other daily necessities.   Among those who raised funds and donated in kind are Fighting Maroons Paul Desiderio, Jett Manuel, Ricci Rivero, Diego Dario, Kyles Lao, Jarrell Lim, Ibrahim Ouattara, Jaybie Mantilla, and the Gomez de Liaño brothers, Joe, Javi, and Juan. NowheretogobutUP Foundation, the UP College of Human Kinetics (CHK), and the Salamat PH Healthcare Heroes also conducted fundraisers to help the frontliners, stranded UP students and staff, and various communities.   “There is so much uncertainty right now and these are extremely difficult times for many Filipinos. That’s why this is the time to be one with our people as we all go through these hardships together. Let’s all do our share in helping one another. Resilience is all about being able to overcome the unexpected. The goal of resilience is to thrive,” said NowheretogobutUP Foundation founding chairman Renan Dalisay......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2020

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | The suffering of animals in zoos

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | The suffering of animals in zoos.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolstandardRelated NewsMay 1st, 2020

WHO wants invite to China’s probe into virus origins

The World Health Organization said Friday it hoped China would invite it to take part in its investigations into the animal origins of the novel coronavirus. “WHO would be keen to work with international partners and at the invitation of the Chinese government to participate in an investigation around the animal origins,” WHO spokesman Tarik […] The post WHO wants invite to China’s probe into virus origins appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMay 1st, 2020

STAYING POWER: These schools have great grassroots programs

Ateneo de Manila University has won it all three times in a row in the UAAP 82 Men's Basketball Tournament. The most recent of which was a season sweep that just yet again proved that in recent history, Blue Eagle the king. Of course, head coach Tab Baldwin deserves much credit for that - he wouldn't take it, but he could. At the same time, though, the blue and white has also given coach Tab all the materials he needs to assemble a juggernaut. And those materials? Ateneo itself, for the most part, discovered and developed them. More than half of the Blue Eagles in UAAP 82 were formerly Blue Eaglets. And even in high school, Nieto twins Mike and Matt, BJ Andrade, SJ Belangel, Geo Chiu, Jason Credo, and Gian Mamuyac were champions. Funnily enough, Thirdy Ravena, who has three Finals MVPs to his name, was unable to take a title in the Jrs. as he was denied by Hubert Cani's Nazareth School of National University and Jerie Pingoy's Far Eastern University-Diliman. Still, Ravena plus those seven other ex-Eaglets all played their part in their season sweep. If you count Ange Kouame, who was taken in even before college and finished his high school in Multiple Intelligence International School, then that makes nine homegrown players for Ateneo. That, without a doubt, makes Katipunan the site of the most successful grassroots program in recent history. And the Blue Eagles are far from finished as they already have the likes of Ian Espinosa, Josh Lazaro, Lebron Lopez, and Forthsky Padrigao waiting in the wings. Not that far behind are usual suspects FEU and San Beda University. Last season, the green and gold counted five Baby Tams who were full-fledged Tams. Add RJ Abarrientos and Cholo Anonuevo to that list and next season, FEU may also very well have half of its Srs. squad grown from its Jrs. program. The Red Lions, meanwhile, had Peter Alfaro, Prince Etrata, Evan Nelle, and Ain Obenza coming from their high school ranks. Only Nelle wound up as a key cog in their almost-season sweep, but with his departure, bigger things are now going to be expected from Alfaro and Etrata. Even more, with standout Red Cubs Rhayyan Amsali, Yukien Andrada, Justine Sanchez, and Tony Ynot coming in, Mendiola would reap the rewards of its stout Taytay program once more. Also enjoying the resurgence of its high school team is San Sebastian College-Recoletos which could boast that top gun RK Ilagan as well as rotation players Michael Are, Rommel Calahat, Alex Desoyo, Gelo Loristo, Jessie Sumoda, and Ken Villapando were former Staglets. For its part, University of Sto. Tomas has CJ Cansino and Mark Nonoy getting promoted from its Jrs. program. Those two comprise the Growling Tigers' backcourt of the present and the future and they have another proud product from the Tiger Cubs coming in the form of Bismarck Lina. Mapua University and Jose Rizal University are yet to barge back into the Final Four, but their rebuild is right on track thanks to building blocks from their high school squads. All of Denniel Aguirre, Warren Bonifacio, Joaqui Garcia, Paolo Hernandez, Eric Jabel, Noah Lugo, Jasper Salenga, Justin Serrano, and Laurenz Victoria are Red Robins-turned Cardinals while the Heavy Bombers now have their core four in ex-Light Bombers John Amores, JL Delos Santos, Marwin Dionisio, and Thomas Vasquez. The University of the Philippines had a growing grassroots program with Gomez de Liano brothers Javi and Juan as well as Will Gozum having come from UP Integrated School. With the GDLs choosing to sit out UAAP 83 and Gozum choosing to transfer to College of St. Benilde, however, the Fighting Maroons have no homegrown players on the roster, at present. That could change, though, if Joe GDL makes the cut or if, next year, current Jr. Maroons Jordi GDL, Aldous Torculas, and Ray Allen Torres opt to stay put. That is also what Adamson University is hoping Jake Figueroa, the UAAP 82 MVP, and Matty Erolon would do after their last year as Baby Falcons. After all, Lorenz Capulong, AP Manlapaz, and Joem Sabandal have already proven to be capable and confident Soaring Falcons. Lyceum of the Philippines University is yet to see a seamless transition from its high school to its college teams, but in NCAA 95 MVP John Barba and former Batang Gilas Mac Guadana, they seem to have their very first homegrown stars. With head coach Goldwin Monteverde taking the reins of the Bulldogs after going back-to-back with the Bullpups, National U looks like it will finally have a clearly connected basketball program. John Lloyd Clemente is already there alongside RJ Minerva, Chino Mosqueda, and Migs Oczon and all of Gerry Abadiano, Kevin Quiambao, and Carl Tamayo may very well join them for coach Gold's first year in the Srs. Meanwhile, De La Salle University has had quite the up and down track record in taking full advantage of its TWO high school programs. Only Aljun Melecio, a former Jr. Archer, and Joel Cagulangan, a former Greenie, were the homegrown Green Archers last season and with the latter having moved on, only the former remains. La Salle's shortcoming has been CSB's gain as the Blazers have only welcomed with open arms La Salle Green Hills products Ladis Lepalam, Sidney Mosqueda, Unique Naboa, Mark Sangco, and Luigi Velasco as well as DLS Zobel product Prince Carlos. Here are the other teams who had homegrown players on their rosters last year: ARELLANO CHIEFS Marlon Espiritu. Kent Segura. Lars Sunga. LETRAN KNIGHTS Christian Balagasay. Jerrick Balanza. Neil Guarino. Kurt Reyson PERPETUAL ALTAS Jasper Cuevas. Jielo Razon. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 23rd, 2020

Rappler’s Marites Vitug part of 2020 'NataliPrize grand jury

MANILA, Philippines – Rappler editor-at-large Marites Vitug is one of the 5 judges of this year’s Lorenzo Natali Media Prize, or the 2020 #NataliPrize . The Lorenzo Natali Media Prize recognizes journalists around the world who report on sustainable development issues. Each year, a grand jury of leading ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 21st, 2020

Environmental advocates urge leaders to put nature on top of agenda

In an open letter ahead of the Earth Day, 300 environmentalists urged the country’s leaders to address biodiversity loss, climate change and ecological amnesia......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 21st, 2020

Virus mutating, but won’t affect drug, vaccine work

Scientists are now aware that the novel coronavirus is changing its genetic makeup slightly, but the rate of mutation is slow and no evidence of a change in the virus’s biology has been found, meaning these minor mutations will not affect current drug and vaccine development, scientists have said. However, viruses mutate naturally as part […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 19th, 2020

Bucks establish emergency relief fund for part-time employees

The Milwaukee Bucks have established an emergency relief fund for part-time employees of Fiserv Forum, the team’s home arena. The Bucks Emergency Relief Fund will provide financial relief for part-time employees of the arena’s food and beverage provider, housekeeping employer and parking partners. The relief fund also will assist part-time employees at the Menominee Nation Arena. That’s the home arena for the Wisconsin Herd, the Bucks’ NBA G League affiliate. So far, the Bucks have provided $500,000 in financial assistance to the part-time employees, and an additional $500,000 is on the way through the relief fund. NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo and All-Star forward Khris Middleton have contributed $100,000 each. All their Bucks teammates have committed to donate to the cause. Bucks ownership is matching all player donations......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 11th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 4

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 3 --- Pingoy Rule: Never back down. --- Jerie Pingoy enjoyed his time in Ateneo de Manila University. Actually, perhaps, he enjoyed too much. After a so-so rookie year as a Blue Eagle, the 5-foot-11 point guard then struggled with his grades. That put him - along with John Apacible, Hubert Cani, Kemark Carino, Clint Doliguez, CJ Perez, and Arvin Tolentino - in danger of being sidelined for UAAP 79 as the Katipunan-based school is, famously, strict with its academic requirements for student-athletes. Years later, Pingoy made it clear, though, that he just barely missed out on the cut. "'Di ako bagsak. Probi (probationary) lang ako kasi nagkulang lang ako ng 0.1 na QPI (Quality Point Index)," he recalled, through chuckles, in a phone interview. Indeed, Spin's Reuben Terrado reported then that "Perez and Pingoy could take summer classes in order to meet Ateneo's QPI and become eligible to play." Whatever it was, the now-25-year-old had another problem on his hands - not that long after finally putting behind him the complications his college commitment brought about. Talking about the two-year residency put on the shoulders of Pingoy, then-Ateneo head coach Bo Perasol said, "The time he needed to mature and adjust also affected his studies." The situation he found himself in may have been remedied, but the fact of the matter is that he didn't do enough to go over the academic bar the Blue Eagles have set. "Simply put, he didn't meet the required QPI, or grade requirements, for that year," Epok Quimpo, team manager from then to now, said. NEW NAME And it's not as if what was happening on-court was that much better. After a standout stint in high school, Pingoy averaged 3.5 points and 2.8 assists in his first - and ultimately, last - year in Ateneo. Not only that, he found himself, more often than not, the one chasing the tail of fellow point guard Matt Nieto. Pingoy was actually the starter in his first game, officially, as a Blue Eagle in UAAP 78. As the season rolled along, however, the blue and white grew to have more trust in Nieto, who would come to be known as "Matty Ice," or, when push came to shove, just put Kiefer Ravena at point. Make no mistake, though, Pingoy was never a bad teammate. "'Di ko iniisip na kakompetensya ko sina Cani o Matt. Iniisip namin talaga na one as a team kami," he said. He then continued, "Kung sino nandun sa court, we support. Lagi nga naming sinasabi ni Cani, kung si Matt nasa loob, cheer lang kami." In the end, the Cebuano failed to fulfill for Ateneo the promise he once had as a one-time champion and back-to-back MVP in the UAAP Jrs. "Sayang lang na we weren't given an opportunity to prove ourselves na kaya naming makipagsabayan. Kulang kami sa playing time, sa totoo lang, but still, it was a good run for me, yung sa Ateneo," he said. And so, sooner than later, the on-court struggles came to a head with the off-court struggles. In 2016, Pingoy decided to leave the school he decided to leave Far Eastern University-Diliman for. "Nagsisialisan na mga kasama ko so naisip ko, wala na akong kasama," he said, referring to the transfers of Cani and Tolentino to FEU, Carino and Doliguez to San Beda University, and Perez to Lyceum of the Philippines University. He then continued, "Eh that time, tinatawagan na rin ako ng Adamson. Sabi ko, what if dito ko makuha yung chance na ma-prove ulit na ito na ako?" NEW NEST Pingoy got to try and answer that question as he transferred to Adamson University. "I needed a change. Gusto kong mag-iba ako. Nag-decide akong ibang Jerie Pingoy naman," he said. "Siyempre, Franz Pumaren din yun. Alam kong nakakapagod yung practice, pero sabi ko kakayanin ko 'to." Of course, with his transfer, Pingoy had to undergo another year of residency - this, adding to the two he had to serve out of high school. Once he was finally eligible for the Soaring Falcons, though, Pingoy wasted no time giving glimpses of the player many believed he was or was going to be. In UAAP 80, he posted per game counts of 7.1 points, 5.1 assists, 2.6 steals, and 2.5 rebounds and was a key cog as Adamson yet again made it to the Final Four. Finally, he was having fun and playing fun. "Adamson, it's a nice school. Yung Falcons, we had a good team. Naging masaya ako sa Adamson," he said. As it turned out, however, another storm was on the horizon. NEW NIGHTMARE In the final frame of the last game of the UAAP 80 elimination round, Pingoy landed on the foot of FEU's Jasper Parker and had to be helped off the floor. Initial diagnosis had him with a sprained left foot. It was much more than that, apparently, as the sprain only opened the floodgates on the bone spurs that had long been building up inside his left foot. And so, right after Adamson bowed out of contention, he decided to have surgery to take care of all the bone spurs. "Inoperahan ako nung December 2017 sa Pampanga and pagkatapos, I was thinking na all good na siya. Kaya lang, the following months, nung January or February 2018, nafi-feel kong 'di pala siya okay," he shared and added that he went outside Manila because the operation would be cheaper there. He then continued, "Ang sakit pa rin ng paa ko. 'Di ako maka-practice o makalaro nang todo kasi tumatakbo akong parang naka-tiptoe yung kaliwa ko." Pingoy went on to practice and play through the pain all the way to UAAP 81 where it became clear that he wasn't the player he was just a year ago and only normed 3.3 points, 2.1 assists, and 1.9 rebounds. "Sobrang frustrating kasi yung last year ko sa Adamson, 'di talaga ako fit nun. Yung laro ko, medyo bitin," he said. He then continued, "'Di naman ganun laro ko. Ang laking factor na naoperahan akong hindi successful." Yes, ultimately, it was concluded that the surgery he had was a failure. After that season, Pingoy had his left foot checked on by famed sports doctor Raul Canlas and what the latter told the former was nothing but a punch to the gut. "Sabi niya, bakit daw hindi inoperahan yung mismong may bone spurs," he said. Canlas was only willing to make it right, but of course, there was the matter of payment and, unfortunately, Pingoy was forced to pay out of his pocket as, by then, he had already decided to forgo his fifth and final playing year with Adamson. "Pagtapos ng season, sabi ko na sa kanilang 'di na ako tutuloy kasi nahihirapan ako sa paa ko. Baka ano pang mangyari sa akin kung pinilit ko," he said. Once a highly recruited player, Pingoy, right then and there, had no one to turn to but himself. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Sila yung nagbibigay ng inspirasyon sa akin. Iniisip ko, para sa mga anak ko 'to, para sa kinabukasan nila." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 11th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 --- Pingoy Rule: Never look back. --- Along with being a champion and back-to-back MVP in UAAP Jrs., Jerie Pingoy is best known for a league rule that was put in effect after his actions. There's even a possibility that many know Far Eastern University-Diliman's once promising prospect just from having been the poster boy of the so-called "Pingoy Rule." Back in 2012, Pingoy had for himself a title run and a second straight top individual player award in his last year in high school. And so, more than a few were interested in securing the services of the 5-foot-11 point guard. Ultimately, the decision came down to moving on up to FEU's Srs. squad or moving on to Ateneo de Manila University. The latter was what Pingoy decided to be best for him. Not long after, the league instituted a new rule that required two-year residency for student-athletes who transfer from one UAAP high school to another UAAP college. As such, the then-18-year-old was forced to stay on the sidelines for two years. And even then, he already knew how much those two years would mean to his future. Fast forward to now and Pingoy is far removed from being a true blue-chip recruit out of high school or even a talented transferee in college. Now, he is just like any other player hoping for another shot to prove himself. Now, the Cebuano could only rue what could have been. "Unang-una, nasasayangan ako sa years na 'di ako nakapaglaro. Kung nakapaglaro ako ng dalawang taon, mag-iiba yung takbo ng panahon," he said in a phone interview. He then continued, "'Di magiging ganito." CODE RED Momentum is a true thing in sports - much more in basketball where the action goes on and on and on. And coming off a championship and back-to-back MVPs, Pingoy's confidence and capabilities were as high as they have been as he took on a new challenge in Ateneo. Only, he was not eligible to play in the UAAP Seniors just yet. Simply put, Pingoy lost all the momentum he already had after leaving FEU-Diliman. "For sure, mag-iiba talaga yung laro ko kapag nakapag-start ako agad. Once makapaglaro ako right after high school, mas magiging mature ako eh, mas malalaman ko agad yung laro sa college," he shared. He then continued, "Hindi ko natantsa agad sa Ateneo na ganun pala sa college. Nung naglaro na ako, 'di na ako rookie sa age, pero rookie pa rin ako sa laro." Indeed, after putting up per game counts of 21 points to go along with 5.1 assists, 4.2 rebounds, and 2.1 steals in his championship and MVP season as a Baby Tamaraw, two years later, he averaged 3.5 points and 2.8 assists as a rookie Blue Eagle. For Pingoy's former mentor, it was clear as day that the long layoff, as well as all the talk surrounding his decision, had a negative effect. "May impact sa bata yung nangyari kasi naka-distract lahat yun sa pag-usad ng career niya. Sa tingin ko lang, if he (would have stayed) in FEU, magkakaroon siya ng peace of mind," former FEU-Diliman head coach Mike Oliver answered when asked to look back at one of the most controversial college commitments the country has witnessed. He also added, "Yung nangyari kasi, because naging talk of the town siya, I think nagkaroon ng malaking pressure sa kanyang every time na maglalaro siya, he has to show how good he really is." GOLD IS GOLD Of course, Pingoy was still seeing action - albeit with Ateneo's Team Glory Be on the smaller stage and under the dimmer lights of minor tournaments like the Fr. Martin Cup. Still, that could not compare to the competition of the UAAP - a level of competition that was already at the tip of his fingers in high school and only needed to be grasped in college. "Nahirapan akong mag-adjust kasi for two years, 'di ko naman alam laro ng Team A. Siyempre, iba naman yung nasa Team B kasi iba pa rin yung nandun ka (sa UAAP) at nakakalaro kahit konti lang," he said. Still, years later, Pingoy has no regrets about transferring to Katipunan. As he put it, "Nalungkot lang ako kasi nga sayang, pero 'di ako nagsisisi." And while he did not necessarily tap into his potential, he remains nothing but proud of his time wearing the blue and white - from Team Glory Be to the Blue Eagles. "Proud ako na yung batch namin nina Fonzo Gotladera yung unang Team B na nag-champion. Masayang-masaya ako dun," he shared. He then continued, "At least, nakapabigay ako ng isang championship sa Ateneo - kahit Team B lang." At the same time, Pingoy said he also made it a point then to get to know the Atenean way. "Sa Ateneo, tinuturo maging 'man for others.' Yun talaga ang natutunan ko dun aside from matututong mag-English," he shared with a laugh. He then continued, "Pero ngayong naaalala ko nga, iba talaga sa Ateneo. Magiging wiser ka talaga eh." WHITE LIGHT That wisdom has apparently allowed Pingoy to bear no ill will towards those who disagreed with his decision. From then to now, he remains adamant that he has no problems whatsoever against the ill-fated "Pingoy Rule." "'Di talaga ako nagalit kahit kanino. Iniisip ko lang lagi that time na okay lang yan and everything happens for a reason," he said. He then continued, "Kung ginagawa nila yun, ibig sabihin, ayaw ka nila." Now, the "Pingoy Rule" is no more as Congress had passed the "Student-Athlete Protection Act (SAPA)" which, for one thing, prohibits residency rules on high school graduates transferring to a different school for college. If this were already law before he committed to any college, he wouldn’t have had to undergo residency at all. However, the SAPA was passed in 2015 and by then, Pingoy had already served two years. Meaning, it was a case of too late the hero. While it didn't do him any favors personally, though, Pingoy is nothing but glad to have been part of a much-welcome change. "Deep inside, naramdaman ko rin naman dating napaka-unfair nila, pero ngayon, okay na yun. Unfair sa akin dati, pero masaya ako ngayon kasi yung mga bata, makakapili na ng school na gusto nila talaga," he said. He then continued, "Sobrang masaya ako dun. Sobrang thankful ako dun." That means that now, any recruit, from blue-chippers to solid players, could choose whatever college they want without having to think that they could lose their momentum from high school. Indeed, he could rest assured that anybody as highly recruited as he was would now be free to decide what’s best for them. However, it may very well take some time before we witness anybody like him - because without a doubt, Jerie Pingoy was a man among boys in high school. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Ateneo gave me an opportunity na matulungan yung family ko. I wasn't thinking of myself lang that time. The opportunity was there e, why not grab it?" --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 9th, 2020

Framing poverty

Letter to the Editor April 4, 2020 Much as we thank our friends in the media for highlighting the reality of uncertainty, some suggestions should be made in reporting the plight of the urban poor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Feel-good stories that highlight resiliency help sell more papers, provide higher broadcast ratings and generate more… The post Framing poverty appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsApr 4th, 2020

No games, big losses: Money crisis faces US Olympic sports

By EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer DENVER (AP) — The postponement of the Tokyo Games has catapulted the sports organizations that make up the backbone of the U.S. Olympic team into crisis. At least one has already started layoffs and others are desperate to stay solvent. Some are expecting a major downturn in membership dues, while others are reeling from event cancellations totaling more than 8,000 across all sports. A database analyzed by The Associated Press shows combined projected losses of more than $121 million in revenue between February and June for 43 of the 50 national governing bodies that responded to a survey from the NGB Council in the wake of the coronavirus crisis. As much or more as the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee, which serves as an umbrella regulator of the country's Olympic sports, it's the NGBs that provide funding and other support for athletes to pursue their dreams at the Olympic and other elite levels. About 80% of the typical NGB's budget goes toward supporting athletes. Not including the U.S. Tennis Association — an outlier because of the massive revenue it generates from the U.S. Open — the NGBs have a combined annual revenue of about $685 million. By comparison, the NFL and NBA each reportedly brought in about $8 billion during the latest completed season. Half the NGBs are little more than ma-and-pop operations, working with small staffs and on revenue not more than $5 million a year. The USOPC, which sent cash grants to the individual NGBs to the tune of around $65 million in 2018, is also in uncharted territory. The postponement of the Olympics forces the federation to make up for a shortfall nearing $200 million without the NBC payout that comes during Olympic years. The USOPC broke with recent practice by not taking out insurance against that possible loss, instead deciding to self-insure. Some of the shortfall is expected to come from an endowment fund created out of a surplus from the 1984 LA Olympics. The USOPC says the losses across American sports could range from $600 million to $800 million. A good portion of these losses can be recouped if the games go forward, as expected, in 2021. But staying financially healthy until that time is not a given for some of the more vulnerable NGBs. “I haven't heard anyone say their NGB itself was going to go out of business,” said Max Cobb, the president of U.S. Biathlon, who doubles as leader of the USOPC's NGB Council. “But there's very little buffer to absorb any revenue loss for an NGB. They all run on a very tight revenue and expense model, and very few have much in the way of savings.” Already, USA Cycling, a mid-sized NGB with an approximate annual revenue of $15 million, laid off eight of its 70-person staff. And USA Rugby, which existed on about $14 million in revenue through 2017, was already teetering and could be nearing closer to bankruptcy with the added uncertainty the Olympic postponement has brought. Many NGBs, such as cycling, are event driven — reliant on cash brought when people sign up for local and national competitions that they sanction. Others, such as USA Swimming, get their lion's share of funding from membership dues, which are taking a hit as facilities around the nation close on the order of state and local governments. “We, as an NGB, will feel it next fall when memberships start rolling in. That shortfall could have a profound effect,” said USA Swimming's Tim Hinchey. “We can overcome a lot of these things, I think, if all comes back to normal. But we have to wait and see like everyone else.” The only event that makes money for swimming is its Olympic trials, which are also a significant revenue source for track, gymnastics and other sports that send large teams. All have been postponed, to be rescheduled when the IOC sets a new date for the Olympics in 2021. The USOPC recently sent a letter to Congress asking for $200 million to be included in the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package that passed through the House of Representatives on Friday. The money, it said, was to be used to support about 2,500 athletes and to help NGBs, which have a total of about 4,500 full-time employees. “On short notice, we surveyed NGBs and then made additional assumptions about the current and future impact of the pandemic on athlete financial support,” CEO Sarah Hirshland said. “Reflective of that work, funds were requested on behalf of athletes and NGBs only.” That request wasn't granted — the federal government has a long history of not providing financial support to the Olympics — though Cobb said he was encouraged that not-for-profit businesses such as the NGBs are allowed to apply for loans as part of the stimulus package's $349 billion “Paycheck Protection Program.” Hinchey said he'll direct some struggling swim clubs to also seek relief from the loan program. What's clear to Cobb is that without some help, more layoffs could be imminent at some NGBs, while others will suffer in ways that the broad public might not recognize right away. Without as much revenue to support a wider swath of coaching and training programs, to say nothing of equipment and state-of-the-art training facilities, some sports' pipelines might suffer. “The athletes receiving the support right now have earned that by being the best in the country,” Cobb said. “But it's that next generation of athletes, and all the NGBs rely on that next generation, that's the group that's the most impacted.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 28th, 2020