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LOOK: Per-team results of the 2019 NBA Draft

Check out the 2019 NBA Draft results, broken down by team: (Results include trades that have not yet been officially announced) EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTA HAWKS R1P4 De'Andre Hunter (from LA Lakers, via New Orleans Pelicans) R1P10 Cam Reddish (from Dallas Mavericks) R2P4 Bruno Fernando (from CHI via LAL, PHI) BOSTON CELTICS R1P14 Romeo Langford (from Sacramento Kings via Philadelphia 76ers) R1P22 Grant Williams R2P3 Carsen Edwards (from CLE via NYK, ORL, and PHI) R2P21 Tremont Waters CHICAGO BULLS R1P7 Coby White R2P8 Daniel Gafford (from MEM) CHARLOTTE HORNETS R1P12 PJ Washington Jr. R2P6 Cody Martin (from WAS via ATL, DEN and ORL) R2P22 Jalen McDaniels (from OKC) BROOKLYN NETS R2P1 Nicholas Claxton (from NYK via PHI) R2P26 Jaylen Hands (from POR via ORL, DET, and LAC) CLEVELAND CAVALIERS R1P5 Darius Garland R1P26 Dylan Windler (from Houston Rockets) R1P30 Kevin Porter Jr. (from Milwaukee Bucks, via Detroit Pistons) MIAMI HEAT R1P13 Tyler Herro R2P2 KZ Okpala (from PHO, via IND) NEW YORK KNICKS R1P3 RJ Barrett R2P17 Ignas Brazdeikis (from ORL via NYK and SAC) DETROIT PISTONS R1P15 Sekou Doumbouya R2P7 Deividas Sirvydis (from DAL) R2P27 Jordan Bone (from DEN via MIL, ATL, PHI) ORLANDO MAGIC R1P16 Chuma Okeke PHILADELPHIA 76ERS R1P20 Mattise Thybulle (from LA Clippers and Memphis Grizzlies, via Boston Celtics) R2P24 Marial Shayok INDIANA PACERS R1P18 Goga Bitadze WASHINGTON WIZARDS R1P9 Rui Hatchimura R2P12 Admiral Schofield (from SAC via MIL, BKN and PHI) TORONTO RAPTORS R2P29 Dewan Hernandez MILWAUKEE BUCKS None WESTERN CONFERENCE DALLAS MAVERICKS R2P15 Isaiah Roby (from DET via OKC and BOS) DENVER NUGGETS R2P14 Bol Bol (from CHA via ATL and MIA) GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS R1P28 Jordan Poole R2P9 Alen Smailagic (from NOP) R2P11 Eric Paschall (from LAL via IND, CLE and ATL) HOUSTON ROCKETS None MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES R1P6 Jarret Culver (via Phoenix Suns) R2P13 Jaylen Nowell (from MIA via CHA) LA CLIPPERS R1P27 Mfiondu Kabengele (from Denver Nuggets, via Brooklyn Nets) R2P18 Terrence Mann MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES R1P2 Ja Morant R1P21 Brandon Clarke (via Oklahoma City Thunder) OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER R1P23 Darius Bazely LA LAKERS R2P16 Talen Horton-Tucker (from BKN via CHA, MEM, and ORL) NEW ORLEANS PELICANS R1P1 Zion Williamson R1P8 Jaxson Hayes (via Atlanta Hawks) R1P17 Nickel Alexander-Walker (from Brooklyn Nets via Atlanta Hawks) R2P5 Marcus Louzada Silva (from ATL) PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS R1P25 Nassir Little PHOENIX SUNS R1P11 Cameron Johnson (from Minnesota Timberwolves) R1P24 Ty Jerome (from Philadelphia 76ers via Boston Celtics) SAN ANTONIO SPURS R1P19 Luka Samanic R1P29 Keldon Johnson (from Toronto Raptors) R2P19 Quinndary Weatherspoon UTAH JAZZ R2P20 Jarrell Brantley (from IND) R2P23 Justin Wright-Foreman R2P28 Miye One (from GSW) SACRAMENTO KINGS R2P10 Justin James (from MIN via CLE and POR) R2P25 Kyle Guy (from HOU via NYK) R2P30 Vanja Marinkovic (from MIL).....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 21st, 2019

Warriors lose Stephen Curry to broken hand, look for answers

By Janie McCauley, Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — D’Angelo Russell has done this before, forced to take on a far bigger role just last season because of injuries in Brooklyn. And now the new Golden State guard must do it again with the absence of both Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson in a suddenly short-handed backcourt. Curry broke his left hand in a 121-110 loss to Phoenix on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) and it remained unclear a day later how long he might be sidelined, while Splash Brother Thompson could miss the entire season recovering from July 2 surgery for a torn ACL in his left knee that he hurt in a Game 6 loss in the NBA Finals that gave Toronto its first title. Curry underwent a CT scan Thursday (Friday, PHL time) but the team said it would have specialists evaluate the results before providing an update on his status. However long he is out, it hurts for far more than what he brings on the court. Curry’s presence in the locker room provides an example for the young Warriors, and he is their longest-tenured player and their oldest at age 31. It will be up to players like Russell and Draymond Green to help keep things afloat for the time being. Curry posted a smiling photo of himself, with the hand heavily wrapped, Thursday (Friday, PHL time) on his Instagram account with the message: “Appreciate all the love/texts/support all that ... Be back soon!”         View this post on Instagram                   Why him ????‍?? he’s like the truest & realist leader of this team always will be the heart & soul of the Dubs gonna be different without you @stephencurry30 ???????????? #GetWellSoon A post shared by GSWReign (@goldenstatewarriorsreign) on Oct 31, 2019 at 3:17pm PDT The two-time MVP drove to his left defended by Kelly Oubre Jr. and with Aron Baynes standing solidly in the paint trying to draw a charge. Curry leapt with the ball then came down head first landing awkwardly on his hands to brace himself from the court, with Baynes crashing onto Curry’s left hand. Curry grimaced in pain grabbing his hand then walked to the locker room with 8:31 left in the third quarter. Russell understands he faces a tall task. “Definitely trying to take on that leadership role and continue to get better every year with being able to lead guys on what I see and what I’ve been through,” he said. “It’s definitely a similar situation, but it’s going to be tougher. We’ve got a lot of young guys that are going to be forced to mature and step up, so I’m looking forward to it as well. ... It’s an opportunity. Go back to the drawing board with the team and the coaching staff, and see what we can do to prepare for each game day in and day out. The big thing I see is just opportunity for a lot of people.” In fact, Warriors coach Steve Kerr planned to gather his staff Thursday (Friday, PHL time) — the player development coaches have already been working on overload — for a serious meeting of the minds to figure out how to push ahead and what combinations might work going forward with so many men down. Golden State already was missing key big man Kevon Looney, who is dealing with a hamstring injury and scheduled to see specialists next week because of an “on-going presence of a neuropathic condition in his body.” Green tweaked his back Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), too. “It’s been a tough start for us on many levels, so we’re just trying to find our footing,” Kerr said. “This puts us in a tough spot, so we’ll assess it and go from there.” The challenge of putting a winning team on the court now seems daunting. What so recently featured five All-Stars in the same starting five is now a cast of mostly rookies thrown into action right away out of necessity — not the norm with these Warriors in recent years. They are 1-3 with two ugly losses — the Suns led 43-14 after the first quarter — at home in new Chase Center, where they are winless and hardly have that overwhelming home-court advantage that Oracle Arena provided night after night across the bay in Oakland. Many already consider it a lost season, with playoff hopes in the powerful Western Conference grim at best. “We just got to make up for it by playing hard and playing together, and making sure we’re together the time he’s out,” said rookie Eric Paschall, who made his first career start and scored a team-high 20 points against the Suns. Two players returned from injuries Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) to make their debuts with Golden State: center Willie Cauley-Stein and guard Alec Burks. General manager Bob Myers mentioned months ago this would be a rebuilding season for the Warriors in many ways. Now, Golden State might be lining itself up for a lottery pick in next year’s NBA draft. The Warriors’ recent fortunes also shed light on just how much must go right to win a championship, let alone reach five straight NBA Finals and capture three titles in four years. There are nine players age 23 or younger. “I don’t know how long it’ll take. It’ll take as long as it takes, I guess,” Myers said at media day. ”... I do know this: We believe that things take time to evolve, and we’re prepared especially with a younger roster to allow that to happen, and that’s the mindset that we have from a coaching staff, from a front office staff, is ‘let’s see how things are going before we make any blanket decisions or judgment on any of it.’ But we’re excited. I mean, look, we’re excited about the youth. We’re excited about the unknown. In years past we’ve had a lot of known, which has been fantastic, but this is different.” Notes: The Warriors on Thursday (Friday, PHL time) announced they have exercised the third-year contract options for the 2020-21 season on guard Jacob Evans III and forward Omari Spellman......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 1st, 2019

30 Teams in 30 Days: Pelicans could be in for seamless rebuild

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: New Orleans Pelicans 2018-19 Record: 33-49, did not qualify for the playoffs Key additions: Zion Williamson (Draft), Lonzo Ball (trade), Brandon Ingram (trade), JJ Redick (free agency), Derrick Favors (trade), Josh Hart (trade), Jaxson Hayes (Draft), Nickeil Alexander-Walker (Draft) Key departures: Anthony Davis, Julius Randle, Elfrid Payton The lowdown: There were teams with worst records and teams with more drama. But no team had a combination of both quite like the Pelicans. It all swirled around Davis, the best player in franchise history, who pulled a power move by switching agents to Rich Paul, business partner of LeBron James. Everyone saw what was coming next except Dell Demps, the beleaguered GM who refused to be proactive and instead tried to fight a losing battle. Through Paul, Davis made a private trade request in the fall and then went public a week prior to the trade deadline when Demps hesitated. When the deadline passed, Davis was still in New Orleans and that was a problem. The rest of the season was a disaster, as Davis was in an awkward state of limbo and the Pelicans, anxious to preserve their only true asset, managed his minutes. The fallout was severe: Fan backlash toward Davis, a fractured locker room, a state of emergency within a franchise that wasn’t among the league’s healthiest to begin with, and Demps getting the boot. Everything else about the Pelicans was overshadowed, such as Randle’s solid production in his first (and subsequently only) season in New Orleans and Jrue Holiday’s continued splendid play on both ends. In the end, Davis had long checked out, the Pelicans fell back into the lottery a year after reaching the second round of the playoffs, and a housecleaning was ordered by ownership. Summer summary: History might reflect that the Davis fiasco, in hindsight, was the most important moment in franchise history, and in a positive way. That’s because a much-needed series of changes were forced to happen because of it, and just maybe the Pelicans will be better off for it. It created a change in command, with David Griffin replacing Demps and tackling the Davis situation head-on rather than tiptoeing around it. And because Davis was essentially benched the entire second half of the season, that allowed the Pelicans to fall into the lottery, where they got lucky and landed the first overall pick in one of those drafts that contained a potential game-changer. New Orleans flipped almost overnight, getting an impressive haul for Davis in the long-awaited trade with the Lakers, and adding Zion Williamson, an explosive talent with gate appeal. It was a best-case scenario for the Pelicans, who went from laughingstock to landing a game on Christmas Day this season. Griffin played his hand skillfully, unlike Demps. Griffin didn’t create distrust or burn bridges and instead maintained good communication with Davis and all potential trading partners. He created a robust market for Davis and then negotiated with the one team that needed Davis the most: the Lakers with an aging LeBron James. Not only did Griffin get promising young players in Ball, Ingram and Hart, he also acquired the Lakers’ future with a collection of first-round picks and first-round swaps. Essentially, if the Lakers collapse in the post-LeBron era, the Pelicans will be awash in assets similar to the Boston Celtics when those Brooklyn Nets’ first-rounders turned to gold. Williamson should never have to worry about talent around him in New Orleans as Davis did. And unlike Davis, Williamson won’t be in a hurry to leave in a huff. There’s no reason for the Pelicans to tank, knowing that ample picks are coming their way. With that in mind, Griffin seized the moment to ramp up the rotation, adding some much-needed shooting in Redick and a reliable veteran in Favors. It’s very possible that the Pelicans can compete for a playoff spot in 2019-20, and again, this seemed remote when last season ended. There’s plenty of hope for Ball. He’ll have the relief of playing away from L.A. for the first time in his life and the advantage of suiting up next to Holiday, who can play off the ball if necessary. Ingram will be returning from a health scare related to blood clots that cut short his season but the prognosis is good. In addition to Williamson, the draft also produced Alexander-Walker, who brings good size (6-foot-5) to the backcourt, and Hayes, a raw big man who’ll instantly enroll in the Pelicans’ development school. To make the upcoming season as stress-free as possible, Griffin handed coach Alvin Gentry a one-year extension. The pair once worked together in Phoenix, when Gentry led the Suns to the Western Conference finals. For the first time in his tenure with the Pelicans, Gentry has ample talent and a solid plan. Now it’s up to him to put the right pieces in place. Clearly, though, the big prize is Williamson, who comes with robust talent and also a personality that reflects well on him and the franchise. Williamson can be a savior and, once Drew Brees retires, the face of New Orleans sports. It all depends if he makes good on the immense expectations. Given his knack for making crowd-pleasing plays on both ends, the burly forward has star potential -- which is exactly what a small market needs. There’s a reason why the Draft lottery results caused Gentry to curse with joy and team employees to dance on tables. Perhaps never before has a franchise fallen hard, then rose suddenly, quite like the Pelicans did in a matter of weeks. They’re still partying in New Orleans. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 10th, 2019

30 Teams in 30 Days: Cavaliers to lean heavily on young roster

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Cleveland Cavaliers 2018-19 Record: 19-63, did not qualify for the playoffs Key additions: Darius Garland (Draft), Kevin Porter Jr. (Draft), Dylan Windler (Draft), John Beilein (coach) Key departures: JR Smith, Cameron Payne, David Nwaba The lowdown: The first season in the post-LeBron James era, Part II, was almost a carbon copy of the first one: He leaves and the team crumbles. This was pretty much expected from a team that was built around LeBron and then suddenly grew old overnight once he left. It didn’t help matters when Kevin Love, given a rich contract the previous summer, played only 22 games because of injury. That ensured the Cavs would be locked into a rebuilding season and rookie point guard Collin Sexton would receive ample playing time as a result, which was not necessarily a bad thing at all. After shaky initially, Sexton finished strong and averaged 20 points the last 2 1/2 months to make the All-Rookie Second Team. Also, swingman Cedi Osman benefited from increased playing time and had moments in his second season. In a mild disappointment, Larry Nance Jr. failed to take a generous step in his development and there’s fear he will be nothing more than a scrappy, hard-working role player who’ll make the occasional highlight dunk. Otherwise, the Cavs’ season served no major purpose. The remaining pieces from the LeBron era either crumbled in various ways or simply disappeared: JR Smith was suspended, essentially for insubordination; Love was hurt; Tristan Thompson plateaued; George Hill and Kyle Korver were traded. The Cavs sunk toward the bottom of the East, fell off radar for the first time in six years, and once again found themselves back in the lottery looking for help. Summer summary: In a summer of surprises around the NBA, one of the more under-rated events happened when the Cavs’ coaching search ended with a 66-year-old grandfatherly type who never spent a day on an NBA bench. John Beilein might well be a revelation, one way or another. He spent much of his college career at Michigan, where he was highly respected for his strategy, composure and character -- three elements he’ll need in Cleveland. Beilein had flirted with the NBA in years past; when nothing materialized, some NBA people thought his time had passed, especially once he reached retirement age. But the Cavs went with an out-of-the-box choice anyway, plucking Beilein even as the college-to-NBA transition comes with inconsistent results and yellow flags. Brad Stevens is the exception, and besides, he was in his mid-30s when he left Butler and took the Celtics job. The one current college coach whose name surfaces the most in NBA conversation is Jay Wright of Villanova, who has served on Team USA and appears NBA-ready (temperament, two-time champ, even wardrobe). Word is Wright will be on the Sixers’ short list if and when that job opens. Because of Beilein's age and the state of the Cavs, he seems a bridge-gap coach; if so, that’s a smart choice. He’s experienced at managing young players, and the Cavs will build their next era through the Draft. Top free agents don’t make Cleveland a destination choice, even when presented with the chance to play alongside LeBron. Given how quiet the Cavs were this summer, the odds are great that they’ll return to the draft lottery in 2020 and give Beilein additional players in their early 20s to nurture. He’ll have five this season, with Sexton and Osman returning, plus Darius Garland, Dylan Windler and Kevin Porter Jr. coming on via first-round picks. The prize is Garland, the No. 5 pick who was limited by a meniscus injury to five games in his one and only season at Vanderbilt. This seems eerily similar to years earlier when the Cavs took another guard with a limited (11-game) college career: Kyrie Irving. Garland was a three-time Mr. Basketball in Tennessee and was considered the best recruit ever at Vandy, and that’s about all NBA scouts had to work with this spring. Not only was his college career brief, but he also left the combine early. Apparently, that was enough for the Cavs, smitten by Garland’s instincts. The only question is how he fits with Sexton; both can play off the ball, although each is more comfortable as the lead playmaker. Porter represents a wild card of sorts. Talent-wise, he can be considered a steal with the 30th pick ... after being red-flagged by teams following a suspension at USC for poor conduct that cost him much of that single season. Porter was a workout beast prior to the draft, a swingman who brings great size (6-foot-6) and can create off the dribble. The Cavs had nothing to lose by choosing him at that point. Windler benefited from four years in college, steering underdog Belmont to the NCAA tourney and developing into a prospect by his senior year. The Cavs and Beilein can figure out how it all fits later. Right now, Cleveland is all about stockpiling as many assets as possible and giving that young core plenty of time to make their mistakes now, rather than later. And speaking of assets, they didn’t trade Love this summer. But that doesn’t mean he’ll be on the roster when next season ends, either. If the right price comes along — and that’ll be tricky because of his age, injury history and salary — Love can and will exit. LeBron James will eventually get a statue outside Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse (formerly Quicken Loans Arena), but he isn’t walking through that door again. The Cavs must take another road to respectability, and it could be a long one. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2019

Raiders GM to absent Brown: Time to be All in or all out

By Josh Dubow, Associated Press Oakland Raiders general manager Mike Mayock told disgruntled receiver Antonio Brown it's time to decide whether he's "all in or all out" about playing this season after losing a fight with the NFL and NFLPA over his helmet. Mayock issued a statement to reporters that the Raiders released in a video on Twitter expressing his frustration that Brown didn't participate in practice Sunday despite being healed from the frost-bitten feet that have sidelined him for most of training camp. GM Mike Mayock issued a statement today regarding Antonio Brown. pic.twitter.com/5ueLsrOmid— Oakland Raiders (@Raiders) August 18, 2019 "You all know that A.B. is not here today. So here's the bottom line. He's upset about the helmet issue. We have supported that. We appreciate that," Mayock said. "But at this point, we've pretty much exhausted all avenues of relief. So from our perspective, it's time for him to be all in or all out. So we're hoping he's back soon. We've got 89 guys busting their tails. We are really excited about where this franchise is going and we hope A.B. is going to be a big part of it starting Week 1 against Denver. End of story. No questions." Brown has been upset that the NFL and NFLPA won't allow him to use the same Schutt Air Advantage that he has used throughout his career. Brown filed a grievance over the issue that he lost on Aug. 12 and then set out to find a newer version of the helmet that was less than 10 years old to get approved. Brown's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, said last week after Brown returned to the Raiders training camp facility that they had found several helmets and were waiting formal approval. Brown took part in pregame warmups before an exhibition game in Arizona on Thursday night and took part in a walkthrough on Saturday, prompting coach Jon Gruden to express confidence that he would soon be able to practice. The helmet was sent to the independent Biokinetics Inc. lab in Ottawa for testing with results shared with biomechanical engineers from both the league and union, a person familiar with the testing said on condition of anonymity because the results weren't released. The person said the helmet was no different than the 2010 version that had previously been rejected and both the league and union determined it wasn't safe enough to be used. Pro Football Talk first reported the failed test after the Raiders walkthrough on Saturday, prompting a profane response from Brown on Twitter. He then didn't take part in practice Sunday, leading to Mayock's forceful statement. Brown had 686 catches and 9,145 yards receiving the past six seasons in Pittsburgh, the best marks ever for a receiver in a six-year span. But he still wore out his welcome with the Steelers after leaving the team before a crucial Week 17 game last season and was able to be acquired by Oakland in March for the small price of third- and fifth-round draft picks. But the drama that surrounded Brown in Pittsburgh didn't stop upon his arrival with the Raiders even though he was given a hefty raise with a three-year contract worth $50.125 million. Brown injured his feet while getting cryotherapy treatment in France, forcing him to start training camp on the non-football injury list. Brown was activated on July 28 and participated in parts of two practices before leaving the team to get treatment on his feet and deal with the grievance with the NFL. Brown returned to the Raiders on Aug. 13 but still hasn't participated in a full practice all of training camp. The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment sets performance and test standards for equipment. Brown's Schutt Air Advantage helmet is no longer allowed because the NFL follows the National Athletic Equipment Reconditioners Association (NAERA) rule that helmets 10 years or older cannot be recertified. Schutt discontinued making the helmet three years ago because current technology had moved past it, according to the company. Brown was one of 32 players using helmets last season that are now banned by the league and players' association. Those players, including Tom Brady, were able to use the helmets last season under a grace period but were required to make the change in 2019......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 19th, 2019

LOOK: Per-team results of the 2019 NBA Draft

Check out the 2019 NBA Draft results, broken down by team: (Results include trades that have not yet been officially announced) EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTA HAWKS R1P4 De'Andre Hunter (from LA Lakers, via New Orleans Pelicans) R1P10 Cam Reddish (from Dallas Mavericks) R2P4 Bruno Fernando (from CHI via LAL, PHI) BOSTON CELTICS R1P14 Romeo Langford (from Sacramento Kings via Philadelphia 76ers) R1P22 Grant Williams R2P3 Carsen Edwards (from CLE via NYK, ORL, and PHI) R2P21 Tremont Waters CHICAGO BULLS R1P7 Coby White R2P8 Daniel Gafford (from MEM) CHARLOTTE HORNETS R1P12 PJ Washington Jr. R2P6 Cody Martin (from WAS via ATL, DEN and ORL) R2P22 Jalen McDaniels (from OKC) BROOKLYN NETS R2P1 Nicholas Claxton (from NYK via PHI) R2P26 Jaylen Hands (from POR via ORL, DET, and LAC) CLEVELAND CAVALIERS R1P5 Darius Garland R1P26 Dylan Windler (from Houston Rockets) R1P30 Kevin Porter Jr. (from Milwaukee Bucks, via Detroit Pistons) MIAMI HEAT R1P13 Tyler Herro R2P2 KZ Okpala (from PHO, via IND) NEW YORK KNICKS R1P3 RJ Barrett R2P17 Ignas Brazdeikis (from ORL via NYK and SAC) DETROIT PISTONS R1P15 Sekou Doumbouya R2P7 Deividas Sirvydis (from DAL) R2P27 Jordan Bone (from DEN via MIL, ATL, PHI) ORLANDO MAGIC R1P16 Chuma Okeke PHILADELPHIA 76ERS R1P20 Mattise Thybulle (from LA Clippers and Memphis Grizzlies, via Boston Celtics) R2P24 Marial Shayok INDIANA PACERS R1P18 Goga Bitadze WASHINGTON WIZARDS R1P9 Rui Hatchimura R2P12 Admiral Schofield (from SAC via MIL, BKN and PHI) TORONTO RAPTORS R2P29 Dewan Hernandez MILWAUKEE BUCKS None WESTERN CONFERENCE DALLAS MAVERICKS R2P15 Isaiah Roby (from DET via OKC and BOS) DENVER NUGGETS R2P14 Bol Bol (from CHA via ATL and MIA) GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS R1P28 Jordan Poole R2P9 Alen Smailagic (from NOP) R2P11 Eric Paschall (from LAL via IND, CLE and ATL) HOUSTON ROCKETS None MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES R1P6 Jarret Culver (via Phoenix Suns) R2P13 Jaylen Nowell (from MIA via CHA) LA CLIPPERS R1P27 Mfiondu Kabengele (from Denver Nuggets, via Brooklyn Nets) R2P18 Terrence Mann MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES R1P2 Ja Morant R1P21 Brandon Clarke (via Oklahoma City Thunder) OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER R1P23 Darius Bazely LA LAKERS R2P16 Talen Horton-Tucker (from BKN via CHA, MEM, and ORL) NEW ORLEANS PELICANS R1P1 Zion Williamson R1P8 Jaxson Hayes (via Atlanta Hawks) R1P17 Nickel Alexander-Walker (from Brooklyn Nets via Atlanta Hawks) R2P5 Marcus Louzada Silva (from ATL) PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS R1P25 Nassir Little PHOENIX SUNS R1P11 Cameron Johnson (from Minnesota Timberwolves) R1P24 Ty Jerome (from Philadelphia 76ers via Boston Celtics) SAN ANTONIO SPURS R1P19 Luka Samanic R1P29 Keldon Johnson (from Toronto Raptors) R2P19 Quinndary Weatherspoon UTAH JAZZ R2P20 Jarrell Brantley (from IND) R2P23 Justin Wright-Foreman R2P28 Miye One (from GSW) SACRAMENTO KINGS R2P10 Justin James (from MIN via CLE and POR) R2P25 Kyle Guy (from HOU via NYK) R2P30 Vanja Marinkovic (from MIL).....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2019

Jaguars hire Marrone, bring back Coughlin, extend Caldwell

MARK LONG, AP Sports Writer br /> Jacksonville's coaching search landed someone from its past and present. The Jaguars can only hope the old-school combination leads to better results in the future. Owner Shad Khan hired Doug Marrone as head coach Monday and brought back Tom Coughlin to oversee football operations. Marrone replaces Gus Bradley, who was fired in late November after going 14-48 in three-plus seasons. The Jaguars (3-13) also gave general manager Dave Caldwell a two-year contract extension. So Marrone, Coughlin and Caldwell are now signed through 2019, giving the new regime a three-year window to, at the very least, make Jacksonville relevant in the AFC South. 'I have confidence that one day soon we'll look back on today's news as the moment that inspired and ultimately established the Jacksonville Jaguars as a football team that wins, week to week and season to season,' Khan said in a statement. 'The results will speak for themselves in time, but with Tom coming in to join Dave and Doug, there is no question the Jacksonville Jaguars are a stronger football team today.' Marrone and Caldwell will report to Coughlin, meaning Jacksonville's first coach is now in charge and will have final say in personnel decisions. Marrone is the fifth head coach in franchise history, following Coughlin (1995-2002), Jack Del Rio (2003-11), Mike Mularkey (2012) and Bradley (2013-16). 'I think Doug has earned the respect of the offensive players, and I'm excited for him to get this opportunity and the direction of this team,' quarterback Blake Bortles told AP in a text message. Coughlin, a winner of two Super Bowls in 12 seasons with the New York Giants, will serve as executive vice president of football operations. Coughlin, who led the Jaguars to four playoff appearances in his first five years, will have final say in the NFL draft and in free agency. Caldwell has been the primary decision maker in all personnel moves the last four years. 'I am honored to welcome Tom Coughlin back to Jacksonville, where winning was customary under his leadership,' Khan said. 'I know he expects the same in his return to head our football operations, and that's good news for us and Jaguars fans everywhere. The extension of Dave Caldwell's contract speaks to his excellent work thus far and the continued importance of complementing our talented and promising roster.' Khan, who hired Jed Hughes of Korn Ferry International to help with the search, also interviewed Atlanta offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan, Tampa Bay defensive coordinator Mike Smith, New England offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels and Arizona offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin for the head coaching job. He ended up keeping Marrone, who served as Jacksonville's interim coach for the final two games. The Jaguars won one and blew a late lead in the season finale at Indianapolis. Players seemed to rally around him, but after the loss to the Colts, rookie cornerback Jalen Ramsey said a 'complete flip will serve us good.' Marrone and Coughlin could provide that. They surely will bring a different vibe, a much more disciplined approach that will put more emphasis on winning games than Bradley did. 'I can see what they're doing,' veteran tight end Marcedes Lewis told AP. 'These are good moves for a young team, a team that needs to be held to a certain standard. Marrone's a good man. He's good for the culture. 'It's not like we're bringing in a brand new coach and he's going to wipe the face of the earth of everything we've built.' Marrone likely will keep offensive coordinator Nate Hackett, providing some stability for the inconsistent Bortles. The 2014 first-round draft pick has had three play callers in three seasons. Marrone has been Jacksonville's assistant head coach/offensive line coach since January 2015. He joined the team after two seasons as Buffalo's head coach. He guided the Bills to a 15-17 record before opting out of his contract because of uncertainty over potential organizational changes. The Bills went 9-7 in Marrone's second season in 2014, the franchise's only winning record since 2004. The 70-year-old Coughlin led the Jaguars to a 68-60 record in eight seasons. Coughlin resigned last January after a dozen years with the Giants, but made it clear he wanted to return to the NFL. He served as a senior adviser to the league's football operations department this season. 'He's got so much experience on myself or on any coach that we have in this building and he's a great individual, so I think you can always learn from people,' Caldwell said after Bradley was fired. 'There's always a place for knowledge.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2017

Projected top PBA rookie pick Munzon rues missed chance to play with CJ Perez in Terrafirma

The 6-foot-4 guard, who is also the country’s No. 1 3x3 player, said he was already looking forward to team up with Perez and Adams – who were likewise the Dyip’s top selections in the 2018 and 2019 draft, respectively — until the blockbuster trade happened last week. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2021

NBA Pacers guard LeVert out after mass found on kidney

In this file photo taken on January 09, 2021 Caris LeVert of the Brooklyn Nets dribbles during the first half against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Barclays Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Sarah Stier / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP) Indiana Pacers guard Caris LeVert, obtained in the four-team NBA deal that sent James Harden from Houston to Brooklyn, is out indefinitely with a small mass on his left kidney. The discovery was made in an MRI exam as part of a physical before the swap involving Houston, Brooklyn and Cleveland was completed, the Pacers said on Saturday. “LeVert will undergo further medical tests and more details will follow as needed,” the Pacers said in a statement. LeVert has averaged 18.5 points, 4.3 rebounds and 6.0 assists a game so far in his fifth NBA campaign, all with the Nets, who obtained him in a trade two weeks after the Pacers made him the 20th pick of the 2016 NBA Draft. “On behalf of my family and myself, we want to thank the Indiana Pacers for their support and guidance,” LeVert said in a statement. “We are grateful for their extreme thoroughness during the physical process and I am looking forward to joining the team and being part of this great organization as soon as possible.” The Pacers landed LeVert, a 26-year-old American, from Brooklyn, and future second-round NBA Draft choices from both Houston and Cleveland in the blockbuster deal. “We acquired Caris because of who he is as a young man first and foremost,” Pacers president of basketball operations Kevin Pritchard said. “His basketball skill and on court play speaks for itself. We know he has a great career ahead of him. “We will support Caris through this time and know that he will join us on the court as soon as he’s able.” The Pacers sent Victor Oladipo to Houston in the swap. The 28-year-old US guard was taken second by Houston in the 2013 NBA Draft. He joined Indiana in 2017 and has been a major spark in the Pacers’ offense and battled back from a ruptured right knee tendon suffered in January 2019, returning in January 2020. “We want to thank Victor for what he gave to the Pacers through his play, his diligence in rehab coming back from a serious injury, and his community efforts,” Pritchard said. “These decisions are obviously never easy and this one in particular was hard because of our relationship.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsJan 17th, 2021

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

36 Bilibid PDLs found with COVID-19 following rapid tests

Thirty-six persons deprived of liberty (PDLs) at the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) in Muntinlupa have tested positive for the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) after undergoing rapid tests, the Bureau of Corrections (BuCor) disclosed on Friday, Oct. 16. The BuCor assured in a statement that the 36 PDLs have been brought to the COVID-19 isolation facility called Site Harry at the NBP. Aside from this, the 36 PDLs underwent confirmatory reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests to determine if they indeed have COVID-19. “If results of the confirmatory test is released, those who are positive for the Covid 19 virus will remain at Site Harry until recovery,” the BuCor said. “The rest who test negative go back to their cells,” it added. The BuCor noted that said RT-PCR tests were conducted by the BuCor Medical Team and supervised by the Department of Health (DOH). The 36 PDLs were among 200 inmates at the NBP’s Maximum Security Compound who underwent COVID-19 rapid tests last Oct. 13. “BuCor’s continuous conduct of rapid test and swab test (RT-PCR) among its PDL is proven to be effective as can be seen in the Bureau’s present covid tally showing low infection rate, low number of active cases and high recovery rate,” the bureau said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 16th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

PBA: Kiefer already high on coach Yeng s player list

Coach Yeng Guiao hasn't even gotten to coach Kiefer Ravena for a full PBA season, and yet, the Phenom is already high on the champion mentor's list. Guiao is pretty sold on Kiefer, saying that his NLEX Road Warriors were lucky to draft Ravena no. 2 in the 2017 PBA Draft. Coach Yeng says that NLEX is also lucky now that Kiefer is back after the guard had to go through his 18-month FIBA suspension. "We were very lucky to have Kiefer, even if the price was not having him for a year and half," Guiao said on Coaches Unfiltered. "We've waited a long time for him and he also wants to show what he can do," he added. For Guiao, Kiefer possesses rare leadership qualities for a player. True enough, as a rookie, Ravena drove the Road Warriors all the way to the 2018 Philippine Cup semifinals. In his first full conference back from suspension, his second overall in the PBA, he had NLEX as the no. 1 seed in the 2019 Governors' Cup. "Kiefer is a natural leader," Guiao said. "Just his leadership qualities, his ability to think through a game, the way he's able to gain the respect of his teammates, those are qualities that are very rare when you combine them in one person," coach Yeng added. Of course, Kiefer is no slouch on the basketball court. He's one of the most gifted young stars in the PBA today and while his sample size of success in the pros is relatively small so far, there's no mistaking about his abilities. Ravena shining on a loaded NLEX backcourt says a lot about his abilities as well. "The good thing about Kiefer is he does not need to dominate the ball, not like when he was in college. I think one strong reason why we have a better team now is because he does not have to carry the load by himself, especially at the guard position," coach Yeng said. "I would rank him very high," Guiao added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Meralco s Bong Quinto shed rookie tag in last PBA Finals

One of the bigger surprises of the 2018 PBA Draft was Letran star Bong Quinto falling all the way down to the second round. With the second pick of round 2 and 14th overall, Quinto was picked by the Meralco Bolts. Over the course of the 2019 season, Quinto saw limited minutes in the first two conferences before breaking out in the Governors' Cup, helping push the Bolts back to the PBA Finals. In the championship round, Quinto felt that he finally arrived. "Lalo na nung semifinals, kasi isa ako sa mga nakatulong sa team lalo na nung Game 5. Pagdating ng Finals, sinabi ko na yung pagiging rookie itatabi ko na yun," Quinto said on 2OT. "Kasi tatlong conference na rin. Yung kaba nandoon, pero ready na ako makipag-compete kahit kanino, kung kanino man ako ma-assign," he added. Quinto and the Bolts ended up losing the 2019 Governors' Cup Finals to Ginebra, pushing the team's record to 0-3 in the PBA Finals. Still, Meralco is hopeful for a better campaign in the Philippine Cup once the league returns from COVID-19. The All-Filipino has been a weakness for the Bolts in the last couple of years, but a retooled local core has some promise. "Gutom na kami eh. Gutom na sa laro, gutom na manalo kami," Quinto said. "Yung preparation namin nandoon na, pero dumating yung pandemic back to zero. Pero workout sa bahay para pagbalik ng Philippine Cup, maka-perform kami ng maayos," he added. — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 12th, 2020

Experts weigh in on cyberbullying in the time of pandemic

With schools forced to implement alternative education modalities such as online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, incidences of cyberbullying are expected to soar even higher in the coming months.  To help parents as well as education practitioners learn how both online and offline communities can protect children and youth from cyberbullying, a panel of local and international experts shared suggestions on how to prevent this phenomenon. Experts from the Philippines and South Korea exchanged views on cyberbullying and how this can be prevented especially with the rising cases among youth in a webinar on cyberbullying organized by Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation recently. During the webinar, 2019 Ramon Magsaysay Awardee and Blue Tree Foundation (BTF) founder Kim Jong-ki shared how he and his foundation has been battling school violence in the past 20 years. The BTF was very instrumental in curbing incidences of violence against students in schools. BTF Preventive Education Center Head Park Ju-han shared that in South Korea, school violence has declined for 15 years but has risen again since 2015. “The main factors are the low aging and the increase of cyberbullying,” he said. Meanwhile, BTF Research and Counseling Team Leader Lee Sun-young discussed how the foundation has been working with schools on the prevention of violence among students and shared some best practices that can be adopted by other countries like the Philippines. “We need to teach children when to respond when cyberbullying is happening,” she said.  “Digital literacy is the first key on how to be nice in the world,” she added.  In the Philippines, UP Manila-Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (CPU) head Dr. Bernadette Madrid noted that “bullying has been increasing.” Based on the results of the national baseline survey on violence against children in 2016, she shared that “bullying in the Philippines was quite high” with 65 percent of the youth – ages 13 to 17 years old – have experienced some form of bullying. Same goes for the prevalence of cyberbullying wherein 44% of the students reported cyber violence. “It is a real problem here in our country, it is harmful but it can be prevented,” Madrid said. Given this, she noted that in terms of prevention, a single program is not enough to address cyberbullying. “We need multiple programs to be more successful,” she added. Meanwhile, Don Bosco Technical College Cebu president and dean Fr. Fidel Orendain noted that protecting students from violence and abuse especially with the shift to e-learning is a challenge for many schools. “This topic is a hot issue for us right now,” he admitted. Since schools are familiar with face-to-face familiarity, he noted that online learning is “challenging our identity and the way we educate.” To resolve this, he urged schools to increase their presence by way of talks and conferences. “We can also make ourselves available for counseling,” he added. For Stairway Foundation, Inc. Senior Advocacy Officer Ysrael Diloy, protecting children at this time is more crucial than ever. In the past 18 years, he has been working with key government agencies in the Philippines, via national level councils and working groups, advocating for child protection policy, and programmatic changes. “We are at an age wherein the current generation of children has known technology as the norm,” he said. Diloy has initiated the CyberSafe program which is currently the flagship child online protection program of the Department of Education (DepEd). “Now more than ever, we need to ensure that we are all contributing to make the Internet a safe space for and with children, so that they can reap all the benefits and opportunities that technology presents – this is the very essence the CyberSafe program hopes to achieve,” he ended......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

PBA: Ginebra rookie Arvin Tolentino marries longtime girlfriend Brandy Kramer

 For Ginebra rookie Arvin Tolentino, the only thing in the air is love. The no. 10 pick of the 2019 PBA Draft out of FEU married longtime girlfriend Brandy Kramer over the weekend, sharing the moment on his Instagram.         View this post on Instagram                   To marry the person you set your heart upon is a joy unparalleled in human life. And yesterday I was the happiest man on earth ?? A post shared by Arvin Tolentino (@arvintolentino5) on Jul 25, 2020 at 9:41pm PDT Brandy is the younger sister Doug Kramer, who retired last year after playing his last game with Phoenix. Arvin is set to join a loaded Ginebra team starting the 2020 season.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 27th, 2020

Stewart, Bird return; Storm beat Liberty in Ionescu s debut

BRADENTON, Fla. (AP) — Breanna Stewart had 18 points, eight rebounds and four steals in her first WNBA game since helping Seattle win the 2018 championship, sending the Storm past the New York Liberty 87-71 Saturday in the season opener for both teams. The 2020 WNBA season, delayed and shortened by the coronavirus pandemic, will be played in a bubble at the IMG Academy. Stewart missed all of last season after tearing her Achilles tendon while playing for her Russian club team in April2019. Jewell Loyd scored 14 points and Sue Bird — who also missed the 2019, because of a knee injury — added 11 points, hitting 3 of 5 from 3-point range, and five assists for Seattle. Sabrina Ionescu had 12 points, six rebounds and four assists in her WNBA debut. Ionescu, the No. 1 pick in April’s draft , was 4-of-17 shooting, including 0 of 8 from 3-point range, and committed four turnovers. Layshia Clarendon led the Liberty with 20 points. Neither team took the court for the national anthem and there was a 26 second moment of silence for Breonna Taylor. Taylor, an African American emergency medical technician, was shot dead in her apartment by Louisville Metro Police officers executing a no-knock search warrant on suspicion of drug possession. No drugs were found. Loyd hit a 3-pointer and then converted a three-point play before Stewart made a layup to make it 34-26 and the Storm led the rest of the way. Jordin Canada scored six points during a 14-4 run to open the fourth quarter that gave the Storm their largest lead when she found Stewart for a 3-pointer that capped the spurt and made it 80-61 with 4:44 to play. New York's Kia Nurse left the game early in the second quarter because of an ankle injury and did not return......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 26th, 2020

PBA: Blackwater making 'slow growth' before pandemic, news of sale

Blackwater is all over the news these days for all the wrong reasons. Aside from the fines and potential other penalties the team faces, the bigger issue is the sale of the franchise. Team owner Dioceldo Sy has put the Blackwater Elite for sale with an asking price of P150 million, that's out there already. [Related: PBA: Blackwater franchise for sale at P150 million] However, unless a buyer quickly picks the team up, the Elite will play in the PBA, perhaps as early as in a couple of months as the league attempts to finish the 2020 Philippine Cup amid the COVID-19 pandemic. So what's up with Blackwater's actual team? "We always believe in the saying na 'slow progress is still progress.' Okay lang samin as long as we improve, yun ang mindset before the pandemic," head coach Nash Racela said about the team on Coaches Unfiltered. "We were happy with how we were developing as a team. If you've watched us during our first tuneup game, tambak kami medyo nakakahiya. But towards the end of February mas gumaganda na takbo namin. As long as we focus on those things, on slow growth, okay kami," he added. Coach Nash is taking over the Elite this year, after coach Aris Dimaunahan handled to team for most of 2019 on an interim basis. Blackwater now features a core of former FEU players like Mac Belo, Mike Tolomia, and Carl Bryan Cruz. The transition should be easier for the team since all of them played for Racela in the UAAP. "In terms of system naman, I've been consistent ever since," coach Nash said. "I think with Blackwater, I'm fortunate to have a group of young players who could really run and put pressure on the defense. Yun yung gusto namin na maging consistent," he added. Aside from a number of former Tamaraws, the Elite also have the oldest rookie in the league in 6'9" Maurice Shaw, the no. 2 pick of the 2019 regular Draft. Blackwater has a role for its new big man, but all of the Elites hopes don't necessarily fall upon him. "With Maurice Shaw, initially nagse-set kami ng not-so-high goals for him, we want him to be the anchor of the defense," Racela said. "Based din sa games namin nagagawa naman niya. Slowly, he's been adjusting to the style of the PBA. In terms of scoring, as long as nandoon siya sa spot niya. We're very positive with Maurice Shaw," he added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2020

PBA: Blackwater franchise for sale at P150 million

Blackwater's PBA franchise is up for sale. On Tuesday night, Philippine Star sports editor Nelson Beltran broke the story that the Elite are eyeing a PBA exit. In a report by Abac Cordero also for the Star, Blackwater team owner Dioceldo Sy bared that he's selling the Elite franchise for P150 million. "I’m open to entertain interested parties as it’s hard for me to continue supporting the PBA when my heart is no longer there,” Sy was quoted as saying. Blackwater entered the PBA during the 2014-2015 season as part of two expansion teams, the other being the Kia Sorento now known as the Terra Firma Dyip. In 15 conferences, the Elite only made the playoffs four times and never made it past the quarterfinals. The closest Blackwater got to the semis was last season in the Commissioner's Cup when the third-ranked Elite lost to Rain or Shine in Game 3 of their best-of-3 series. Recent team moves for Blackwater include drafting Maurice Shaw in the 2019 PBA Draft. The 35-year-old, 6'9" center was the second pick in the regular draft behind Roosevelt Adams for the Dyip. The Elite also tapped Nash Racela to take over as head coach after Aris Dimaunahan handled the team for most of 2019 under an interim basis. Blackwater was already in the news this week after Sy said on "Sports Page" by One Sports that the team has started to conduct workouts. However, this came before the PBA's official go-signal and in turn, the Elite were requested to provide explanation to the league and to the Games and Amusements Board.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2020

No penalty but SBP tells Go and Thiry not to embarrass themselves after viral game

While they ultimately escaped PBA sanctions, Isaac Go and Thirdy Ravena didn't necessarily get off scot-free from their basketball game while Metro Manila is still under quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Last week, a video on social media showed Go and Ravena, among others, engaging in a scrimmage at a gym in San Juan. Go, who is Columbian's top pick from the 2019 Gilas draft, escaped with just a verbal warning from PBA Commissioner Willie Marcial. The same pretty much goes for Thirdy, who is headed to Japan to play for San-en NeoPhoenix in the B.League. [Related: Thirdy Ravena signs with San-en NeoPhoenix in Japan’s B.League] Both players will likewise not any penalties from Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas, but they were reminded by the SBP bosses not to embarrass themselves and the national basketball federation by violating government-mandated health protocols. Not only are they both Gilas prospects, both Go and Thirdy are widely seen as key pillars for the national team's future. "Wala kaming iniisip na penalty o fine," SBP Executive Director Sonny Barrios said about Go and Thirdy during the recent Philippine Sportswriters Association forum. "Definitely napag-sabihan sila ni President Panlilio at ni sir Butch [Antonio] na itigil na yung ginagawa niyong hindi ayon sa regulasyon. Nakakahiya tayo," Barrios added. Aside from Go and Thiry, Ginebra star Japeth Aguilar and Rain or Shine rookie Adrian Wong were also seen on video playing in the said viral game. [Related: PBA: Japeth, Wong fined P20,000 for viral basketball game under quarantine] Aguilar and Wong have been fined P20,000 each by the PBA Monday and will be subject to 30 hours of community service. The pair are also directed to undergo swab testing for COVID-19 before and after a required 14-day quarantine period. — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 7th, 2020