Advertisements


Minibus crashes into bunkhouse in Balamban; 2 hurt

CEBU CITY, Philippines — A trip to a teambuilding activity turned into a nightmare for 24 employees of the social welfare department when the minibus they were on crashed into a bunkhouse and stopped a meter away from the edge of a  deep cliff. The road accident happened at 9:30 a.m. of Saturday, October 17, […] The post Minibus crashes into bunkhouse in Balamban; 2 hurt appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerOct 17th, 2020

PAF chopper crashes in Isabela; 4 dead, 1 hurt

Four personnel of the Philippine Air Force (PAF) died while another one survived when the helicopter they were riding on during a flight proficiency training crashed in Cauayan, Isabela on Thursday night. Major General Edgard Arevalo, APF spokesperson, said Friday that those who perished were two pilots, an aircrew, and a PAF officer. The lone […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsJul 24th, 2020

Bloody Tuesday: Smashups kill 11

A total of 11 persons died and scores were hurt in separate vehicular crashes in Rizal and Cavite provinces on Tuesday—a day after four persons were killed and five others were injured in a nine-vehicle smashup in Bulacan......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 17th, 2019

Bottas, Verstappen crashes overshadow Austrian GP practice

By Eric Willemsen, Associated Press SPIELBERG, Austria (AP) — Valtteri Bottas and Max Verstappen both crashed and seriously damaged their cars during the second practice ahead of the Austrian Grand Prix as the high-altitude track in the Alps showed its perilous side on Friday. Mercedes and Red Bull blamed gusty winds in the montane surroundings for the incidents, which caused the 90-minute session to be red-flagged twice. A third big-name driver narrowly avoided a similar crash as Sebastian Vettel also spun off the track but his Ferrari came to a standstill just before the barriers, limiting damage to his tires only. Before his crash, Bottas posted the second fastest time of the session, trailing Ferrari driver Charles Leclerc by 0.331 seconds. Championship leader Lewis Hamilton, who led the first session in his Mercedes, had the fourth best time, 0.443 behind Leclerc. Bottas slammed his Mercedes into the barriers after he lost control of the rear and spun off the track at Turn 6, leaving the front of his car heavily damaged. The mishap came less than 15 minutes after Verstappen slid off the track backward in Turn 10, badly damaging the right rear of his Red Bull. "Hard to say what happened, maybe it was the wind," Verstappen said. "It's still only Friday so we have time to repair everything for tomorrow." Bottas and Verstappen are the last two winners of the race, in 2017 and 2018, respectively. Neither was hurt in the crashes. Mercedes team principal Toto Wolff said Bottas couldn't be blamed. "Suddenly you have three, four kph more and you are beyond the limit," Wolff said about the strong wind affecting the drivers. Red Bull motorsport adviser Helmut Marko added that Verstappen "wasn't driving faster as before in that turn but the gust just swept away the rear." The incidents made for probably the most eventful practice of the season, hours after Hamilton posted the fastest time in the first practice. The British five-time world champion led Vettel by 0.144 seconds, with Mercedes teammate Bottas 0.161 slower in third. Bottas, who earned his first career podium on this track in 2014 and started the last two years from pole, had missed the first half hour as his power unit had to be replaced to fix an oil leak. Leclerc and Verstappen were ranked fourth and fifth, respectively. Practice was cut short after Niko Hulkenberg lost the left front wing of his Renault on the curb. Many racers, including Hamilton, damaged their front wing on the high edges of the track, called "yellow sausages" by many. TIRED OF TIRES While the opening practice showed Mercedes' unbeaten streak might continue this weekend, an attempt from various teams to create a more level playing field failed earlier in the day. At the center of the discussion was the new type of tires introduced by supplier Pirelli this season. They have a reduced tread gauge which should cut down on blistering. While most teams have found them unpredictable and have struggled to adapt to them, the new tires seem to perfectly fit the strategy of Mercedes, which has won all eight races this season, including six 1-2 finishes. To open up the battle for victories and make the races more appealing again, various teams, led by Red Bull, have been suggesting a midseason return to last year's rubber. But in a meeting with all team principals, Pirelli, and governing body FIA, the proposal failed to get the mandatory support of at least seven of the 10 teams. Apart from Mercedes, the idea was also rejected by Williams, Racing Point, McLaren and Renault. One of the reasons for the dismissal was the lack of data, as teams could only guess how the 2018 tires would work under the 2019 cars. Hamilton initially had been critical of the new tires during preseason testing, but has meanwhile slammed the idea of switching back to the old ones. "Last year you had to manage the tires to a temperature, which means you had to do more lifting and coasting. It was a lot worse," said Hamilton, who attended Friday's meeting. "That's an example again of different teams pushing for different things for their own personal goals rather than for the sport's." Tire management will become a key factor during Sunday's race with temperatures expected to rise up to 33 degrees Celsius (91 F) in thin air......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 29th, 2019

13 hurt as passenger jeepney crashes

At least 13 persons were injured when a passenger jeepney hit a fence after avoiding a car in Marikina City on Wednesday night......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 20th, 2019

12 hurt after multicab crashes into post in N. Bacalso Ave.

12 hurt after multicab crashes into post in N. Bacalso Ave......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 18th, 2016

Train crashes into New Jersey station; 1 dead, 100-plus hurt

Train crashes into New Jersey station; 1 dead, 100-plus hurt.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 29th, 2016

US spy plane crashes; pilot killed, another hurt

US spy plane crashes; pilot killed, another hurt.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 21st, 2016

24 hurt as tourist bus crashes in Barcelona

24 hurt as tourist bus crashes in Barcelona.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 14th, 2016

Olympics: Seven hurt as giant camera crashes to ground

Olympics: Seven hurt as giant camera crashes to ground.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 15th, 2016

Huey heli crashes, another malfunctions while rescuing 4 wounded soldiers

MARAWI CITY  (MindaNews / 28 November) — Two Philippine Air Force (PAF) Vietnam War vintage Huey helicopters figured in two separate accidents while trying to airlift wounded soldiers during operations in Lanao del Sur against the Dawlah Islamiyah militants, locally known as Maute Group, on Thursday and Friday. Maj. Gen. Gene Ponio, commander of the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsNov 30th, 2020

2 pilots, 5 others hurt in Lanao del Sur chopper crash

Two pilots and five others were hurt when an Air Force helicopter crash landed due to mechanical trouble in Madamba, Lanao del Sur Thursday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 27th, 2020

Police captain killed, wife and daughter hurt in Cavite ambush

A police captain assigned in Metro Manila was killed while his wife and daughter were injured when unidentified ambushed them in Imus City, Cavite, Monday morning. Capt. Ariel Ilagan, assigned at the Southern Police District (SPD), died of multiple bullet wounds to the body, said a report from the Calabarzon regional police. His wife Mary […] The post Police captain killed, wife and daughter hurt in Cavite ambush appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2020

2 dead, 6 hurt in Pasay fire

Two women died and at least six others were injured when fire razed a group of houses in Pasay City early Monday, authorities reported. Killed were two women aged 39 and 28, according to a report from the City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office. Six other people, including four volunteer firefighters, were injured, the […] The post 2 dead, 6 hurt in Pasay fire appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2020

To men or the male population, it is okay to be…

  CEBU CITY, Philippines— Men have been perceived to be brave, strong, and masculine. That at times when we see a man breakdown we then associate it for them being weak— and what’s wrong with that? Men are human beings too, they too feel hurt, tired, and loved. For men, it is okay to.. CRY— […] The post To men or the male population, it is okay to be… appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2020

1 dead, 4 hurt after Skyway steel girder collapses

(Updated 3:21 p.m.) A steel girder of the Skyway extension project which is under construction collapsed, crushing vehicles beneath the structure on the East Service Road in Muntinlupa City, killing at least one and injuring four others......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 21st, 2020

Eala comeback falls short, crashes out of pro tourney

After bucking a slow start that saw Salden claim a love set against the 15-year-old Eala, the Filipina tennister couldn't complete the upset and crashed out of the tournament in the second round, 0-6, 6-2, 2-6......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 20th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

13 hurt as LPG tank explodes in Olongapo

Thirteen members of a family were injured when a liquefied petroleum gas tank exploded in Barangay Gordon Heights in this city yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 13th, 2020

Ayala& rsquo;s profit down 75% to P11.4b in first three quarters

Conglomerate Ayala Corp. said Thursday nine-month net profit declined 75 percent to P11.4 billion from P46.1 billion in the same period last year as the pandemic hurt its real estate and banking businesses......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020

‘Ulysses’ leaves 2 dead, 8 hurt in Bicol

Typhoon “Ulysses” left at least two dead, eight hurt and four missing in the Bicol region......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020