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New virus cases on uptrend, spreading fast& mdash;researchers

The upward trend in Metro Manila’s new COVID-19 cases is expected to continue, even though localized lockdowns may have helped slow it down, University of the Philippines researchers who have been tracking the pandemic said Thursday......»»

Category: newsSource: thestandard thestandardFeb 27th, 2021

Chinese cities test millions as virus cases surge

The fast-spreading Delta variant broke out at Nanjing airport. The post Chinese cities test millions as virus cases surge appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2021

EU eases border closures, WHO tackles virus strain

London—Europe on Wednesday began lifting travel bans on Britain put in place to contain a new fast-spreading COVID strain while WHO experts were set to meet on a response to it......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2020

Virus-proofing sports facilities presents a big challenge

By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The jersey-wearing camaraderie. The scent of sizzling sausages. The buzz before a big game. The distinctive atmosphere of live sports, that feeling in the air, will return in time as pandemic restrictions are eased. But will that very air be safe in a closed arena with other fans in attendance? The billions of dollars spent on state-of-the-art sports facilities over the last quarter-century have made high-efficiency air filtration systems more common, thanks in part to the pursuit of green and healthy building certifications. Upgrades will likely increase in the post-coronavirus era, too. The problem is that even the cleanest of air can’t keep this particular virus from spreading; if someone coughs or sneezes, those droplets are in the air. That means outdoor ballparks have high contaminant potential, too. “Most of the real risk is going to be short-distance transmission, people sitting within two, three or four seats of each other,” said Ryan Demmer, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. “It’s not really about the virus spreading up, getting into the ventilation system and then getting blown out to the entire stadium because this virus doesn’t seem to transmit that way. It doesn’t aerosolize that well.” The three hours spent in proximity to thousands of others is part of the fan experience. It's also why major sports leagues have been discussing plans to reopen in empty venues, for now. High-touch areas with the potential to spread the virus — called fomite transmission — are plentiful at the ballgame, of course. Door handles. Stair rails. Restroom fixtures. Concession stands. Hand washing by now has become a societal norm, but disinfectant arsenals need to be brought up to speed, too. “I can’t really find good hand sanitizer easily in stores. So think about trying to scale that up, so everybody who comes into U.S. Bank Stadium gets a little bottle of Purel. Things like that can be modestly helpful,” Demmer said. There is much work to be done. Vigilant sanitizing of the frequent-touch surfaces will be a must. Ramped-up rapid testing capability during pre-entry screening could become common for fans. Minimizing concourse and entry bottlenecks, and maintaining space between non-familial attendees, could be mandatory. Mask-wearing requirements? Maybe. Most experts, including those at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, believe the primary mode of transmission for COVID-19 is close person-to-person contact through breathing, coughing or sneezing but there's no consensus on some of the details. “There’s still widespread disagreement between experts on which mode of transmission dominates for influenza. So the likelihood of us figuring this out soon for this virus is low,” said Joe Allen, director of the Healthy Buildings Program and an assistant professor at Harvard’s School of Public Health. “We may never figure it out, but I also think it’s irrelevant because it’s a pandemic and we should be guarding against all of them.” Including, of course, the air. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers designed the Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) scale to measure a filtration system's effectiveness (from 1-16) at capturing microscopic airborne particles that can make people sick. Not just viruses, but dust, pollen, mold and bacteria. Most experts recommend a MERV rating of 13 or higher, the minimum standard for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. An emerging technology in this area is called bipolar ionization. Connecticut-based AtmosAir has a bipolar ionization air treatment system in about 40 sports venues. Staples Center in Los Angeles was one of the first major sports customers. TD Garden in Boston and Bridgestone Arena in Nashville are among the others who’ve signed on. The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority approved last year a 10-year contract for a little more than $1 million with AtmosAir to install its system in U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Vikings and the first indoor NFL stadium to use it. The building, which measures 1.8 million square feet, has 53 air handling units with AtmosAir tubes installed, including 30 in the seating bowl. The ions act like fresh air, reducing the amount of outside air needed to be introduced for the cleansing process. The protein spikes in the coronavirus particles make them easier to catch and kill, said Philip Tierno, a New York University School of Medicine professor of microbiology and pathology. Said AtmosAir founder and CEO Steve Levine: “We’re never going to create a mountaintop, but we’re going to put in maybe three to four times the ions over the ambient air and then let those ions attack different pollutants in the air. The ions grab onto particles and spores and make them bigger and heavier, so they’re much easier to filter out of the air." The next time fans do pass through the turnstiles, in a few weeks or a few months, in most cases they will probably encounter an unprecedented level of cleanliness. “There will be some controls that are visible, extra cleaning and disinfection, but some of it will be invisible, like for what’s happening in the air handling system,” said Allen, the Harvard professor. “The consumers will decide when they feel comfortable going back, and that’s going to depend on what strategies are put in place in these venues and stadiums and arenas and, most importantly, how well these organizations communicate that to the paying public.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2020

Newly identified Langya virus being tracked after China infection

ISTANBUL - Researchers are monitoring a newly identified virus in China that appears to be transmitted from animals to humans.While more than three dozen cases have been recorded in China since the virus was first detected in late 2018, it was only formally identified this week.Cases.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 12th, 2022

Monkeypox preventable with Covid-19 protocols

MANILA - Although no cases of monkeypox have been detected in the country so far, a disease expert advised continuing Covid-19 health protocols as they may help prevent the virus now spreading across Europe and Africa.Infectious disease expert Dr. Edsel Salvana said Tuesday that wearing mask.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJul 6th, 2022

Delta variant causing early stage of surge in Metro Manila& mdash;OCTA

Independent researchers tracking the COVID-19 pandemic said Sunday Metro Manila is already in the early stages of a coronavirus surge most likely because of the Delta variant as the Department of Health reported 55 new cases of the more transmissible strain......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 25th, 2021

IOC vows to minimize virus risk to Japanese

Tokyo—Olympics chief Thomas Bach pledged Wednesday “not to bring any risk” to Japan with the Games, seeking to reassure a sceptical public as virus cases surge just over a week before Tokyo 2020 begins......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 16th, 2021

Asian markets extend rally as earnings season looms

The rally in global stocks extended into Asia on Tuesday as optimism about the upcoming earnings season outweighs worries over the fast-spreading Delta virus variant that is forcing leaders to reimpose containment measures......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 13th, 2021

S& P: New virus variants to weigh on credit rating

The COVID-19 pandemic could weigh on credit ratings as the slow rollout of vaccines and the fast-spreading Delta variant delay recoveries in some parts of Asia-Pacific, S&P Global Ratings said......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 1st, 2021

PNP checkpoints to remain amid possible easing of restrictions

“We guarantee that the PNP will maintain heightened measures on border control points," Eleazar said, pointing to the increase in the number of COVID-19 cases in other regions besides NCR. "We are trying to prevent the virus from spreading again even in areas that can be considered low-risk areas today.".....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 13th, 2021

& lsquo;3 virus variants spreading& rsquo;

The Department of Health (DOH) on Sunday said experts have detected 266 more cases of the UK, 351 of the South African, and 25 Philippine COVID-19 variants......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 18th, 2021

Virus could force Olympics cancellation

Tokyo—A senior Japanese politician said cancelling the Tokyo Olympics over the coronavirus remains a possibility on Thursday, as a surge in cases renews concerns about the Games with less than 100 days to go......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 15th, 2021

Acting on our own initiatives to survive this pandemic

The surge of fast-spreading strains of COVID-19, coupled with the relaxation of pandemic health protocols, has induced government to call for a two-week time out to curb the sudden spikes in infection cases. But will this work?.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2021

EDITORIAL - Spreading threat

As of last weekend, the Department of Health reported the detection of 18 more cases in the country of the highly infectious variant of the COVID virus that first emerged in the United Kingdom. This brings to 62 the total cases of the UK variant recorded in the Philippines, according to the DOH......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2021

Karenderyas, workplaces are top sources of COVID-19 in Cebu City

CEBU CITY, Philippines — The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been spreading fast in Cebu City with 2,671 active cases now.  The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in the city said that the transmission had been higher at workplaces and at karenderyas specifically.  Councilor Joel Garganera, EOC deputy chief implementor, said the establishments might be compliant […] The post Karenderyas, workplaces are top sources of COVID-19 in Cebu City appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2021

A duty to speak up

In December 2019, a doctor from Wuhan in Hubei province in China used his WeChat social media account to warn the people about a SARS-like virus spreading fast in his city. As a result, Li Wenliang was reprimanded by police for spreading rumors; he was forced to acknowledge that he was wrong......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2021

Stocks drop as virus cases dash vaccine rollout hopes

Hong Kong—Equity markets fell Monday as hopes that vaccines will soon be rolled out were overshadowed by concerns over a pick-up in virus cases around the world......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 1st, 2020

Infodemic risks jeopardising virus vaccines

As early as February, with the global pandemic spreading fast, the World Health Organization issued a warning about an "infodemic", a wave of fake news and misinformation about the deadly new disease on social media......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 29th, 2020

Millions more face English virus restrictions as cases spiral

Millions more people in northern England face stricter coronavirus rules next week, officials said Friday, as reports suggested the government is considering a nationwide lockdown. A digital display shows NHS health advice on the coronavirus in Leeds on October 30, 2020. – West Yorkshire is to be placed under tier three Covid restrictions from November 2, 2020, the strictest level of rules. (Photo by Lindsey Parnaby / AFP) From Monday, nearly 2.4 million residents in five districts of West Yorkshire, including in the city of Leeds, will be barred from socialising with other households indoors. Pubs and bars not serving “substantial meals” must close, alongside casinos and betting shops, while people have also been told to avoid unnecessary travel. The Department of Health said the measures were needed as infection rates in West Yorkshire were among the highest in the country and rising rapidly. The Times reported Friday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson was considering a return to a national lockdown to battle the surge. Johnson was expected to hold a press conference on Monday to announce new restrictions, which would close everything except “essential shops”, schools and universities, the paper said, quoting a government source. In its weekly study of Covid-19 prevalence, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the number of people with the virus had increased to around one in 100 nationwide. “There has been growth in all age groups over the past two weeks; older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest current rates while rates appear to be steeply increasing among secondary school children,” it said. The country’s official science advisory panel warned in a report published Friday that the virus was spreading “significantly” faster and that hospitalisations were rising at a higher rate through England than its predicted “worst-case” scenario drawn up in July. The report said that in mid-October, shortly before new local rules were introduced, around four times as many people were catching Covid than anticipated in the July report. That study warned that 85,000 more people could die during the winter wave. West Yorkshire’s imminent restrictions are the latest step in the UK government’s localised response to the surging transmission, which has come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks. More than 11 million people — about a fifth of England’s population — will be under the tightest measures from next week. Most of the areas in the “very high” category of the government’s three-tier Covid alert system are in northern and central parts of the country. Nottingham became the latest city to enter the highest tier Friday. On Thursday night, young people took to the streets in fancy dress and drank in large groups before a ban on alcohol sales in shops came into force at 2100 GMT. – ‘Targeted’ – The pandemic has hit Britain harder than any other country in Europe, with more than 45,000 people having died within 28 days of testing positive. Case rates are spiralling again after a lull, tracking the situation elsewhere on the continent. England is seeing nearly 52,000 new cases daily, a 47 percent weekly rise, according to the ONS, which conducts its analysis of households with the help of several universities and health bodies, and excludes people in hospitals and care homes.  Britain’s European neighbours and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have reimposed partial lockdowns to try to cut infection rates. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Friday the government would continue its “targeted and focused” strategy of local restrictions in virus hotspots. “The arbitrariness of a blanket approach would be far worse than the effects of trying to be as targeted as possible,” he said. Meanwhile, a new study reported Friday that a Covid-19 variant originating in Spanish farm workers has spread rapidly throughout Europe in recent months and now accounts for most cases in Britain. The variant — called 20A.EU1 — is thought to have been spread from northeastern Spain by people returning from holidays there, according to the study, which is awaiting peer review in a medical journal. There is currently no evidence that the strain spreads faster or impacts illness severity and immunity......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

NFL teams still set to play Sunday despite virus cases

New York, United States—The Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Ravens, New England Patriots and Jacksonville Jaguars remained scheduled to play NFL games on Sunday despite at least one player for each club being placed on the Covid-19 reserve list Saturday (Sunday Philippine time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020